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Maryland Room 
Veraky of Maryland Litwer 



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by the Internet Arch 






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in 2013 







http://archive.org/details/report00mary_89 



STATE OF MARYLAND 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



NINETY-EIGHTH ANNUAL 
REPORT, 



Of The 

State Board of Education 

SHOWING CONDITION 
Of The 

Public Schools of Maryland 

For The 
Year Ending June 30, 1964 



— ♦• 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



/ft. 



MARYLAND DIRECTORY OF SCHOOL OFFICIALS 
October, 1963 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Name Term Expires 

Jerome Framptom, Jr., President Federalsburg 1964 

William L. Wilson, Vice President Cumberland 1967 

Mrs. J. Wilmer Cronin Aberdeen 1966 

William L. Huff Cavetown 1968 

Mrs. William F. Robie Forest Heights 1970 

Richard Schifter Bethesda 1969 

Edward N. Wilson Baltimore 1965 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer 



MARYLAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

STATE OFFICE BUILDING 

301 West Preston Street, Baltimore 21201 

Name Office 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr State Superintendent of Schools 

David W. Zimmerman Deputy State Superintendent 

W. Theodore Boston Assistant State Superintendent in Certification 

and Accreditation 

Paul D. Cooper Assistant State Superintendent in 

Administration and Finance 

Robert C. Thompson Assistant State Superintendent in 

Vocational Rehabilitation 

Wesley N. Dorn Director of Research and Development 

Paul E. Huffington Director of Instruction 

James L. Reid Director of Vocational Education 

Nettie B. Taylor Director of Library Extension 

E. Drusilla Chairs Administrative Assistant I 

Dorothea E. Young Secretary III 

Mrs. Anne M. Ryland Secretary I 

Rosetta D. Dorsey Stenographer 

Walter Blackwell Chauffeur II 

Division of Instruction — Paul E. Huffington, Director 

Mrs. Grace A. Dorsey Assistant Director and Supervisor 

of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Geneva E. Flickinger Supervisor of Adult Education 

Clarence E. Baseman Supervisor of Civil Defense Adult Education 

George M. Crawford Supervisor of Curriculum 

Mrs. Gladys T. Hopkins Supervisor of Curriculum 

Mrs. Mildred L. Sowers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Thomas W. Pyles Supervisor of High Schools 

Lewin A. Wheat Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Genevieve S. Blew* Supervisor of Instruction 

Herbert R. Steiner Supervisor of Physical Education 

Sarah L. Leiter Supervisor of Pupil Services 

Percy V. Williams Supervisor of Pupil Services 

Elliott E. Lapin Supervisor of Special Education 

Andrew W. Mason Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Rozelle J. Miller Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Beverly S. Wozniak Secretary III 

Mrs. Beverly B. Armiger Secretary I 

Mrs. Marlene R. Barber Secretary I 

Marilyn Buckner Secretary I 

Mildred M. Faulstich Secretary I 

Mrs. Janet L. Harrison Secretary I 

Mrs. Rena B. Levitz Secretary I 

Mrs. Rosalind C. Lohrfinck Secretary I 

Mrs. Bessie S. Price Secretary I 

Mrs. Oma K. McClung Clerk-Typist II 

* Part time 



2 



State Curriculum Center 

400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore 21201 

Eleanor K. Hocker Counselor II 

Mrs. Margarett J. Smith Library Assistant 

Division of Library Extension — Nettie B. Taylor, Director 

Kenneth F. Duchac Supervisor of Public Libraries 

H. Thomas Walker Supervisor of Public Libraries 

Mae I. Graham Supervisor of School Libraries 

Doris L. Anderson Secretary III 

Mrs. Martha K. Merz Secretary I 

Division of Vocational Education — James L. Reid, Director 

Glenn W. Lewis Supervisor of Agriculture 

Evelyn F. Miller Supervisor of Home Economics 

Dwight P. Jacobus Supervisor of Educational Services to Industry 

Warren G. Smeltzer Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Raymond G. Pluemer Supervisor of Trades and Industry 

Ernest T. Cullen, Jr Executive Secretary, Maryland Future Farmers of 

America, Easton High School, Easton 

Edward J. Frack Supervisor of Apprentice Training 

Mrs. Mary N. Stultz Executive Secretary, Future Homemakers of Amer- 
ica, Board of Education, Frederick 

Elizabeth McGinnity Secretary III 

Alice Algie Secretary I 

Sandra R. Bush Secretary I 

Mrs. Octavia D. Hastings Secretary I 

Division of Certification and Accreditation 

W. Theodore Boston, Assistant State Superintendent 

Harold D. Reese Assistant Director and Supervisor of 

Teacher and Higher Education 

Helen L. Widmyer Supervisor of Accreditation 

M. Eleanor Rice Supervisor of Certification 

Howard E. Bosley Supervisor in Higher Education 

Charles C. Conlon Supervisor of Trade Schools 

Carroll L. Speck Supervisor of Trade Schools 

John C. Metzger Assistant Supervisor of Certification 

Ruth E. Hobbs Assistant Supervisor of Equivalence Examinations 

Elsie F. Forman Counselor n 

Helen Ellis Secretary III 

Anne Nusinov Secretary III 

Mrs. Katherine Jay Bedford Secretary I 

Mrs. Bessie R. Gale Secretary I 

Mrs. Evelyn R. McClurkin Secretary I 

Gloria Style Stenographer 

Leah C. Dittmar Clerk-Typist I 

Mrs. Gertrude A. Gorrell Clerk-Typist I 

Geraldine L. Henry Clerk-Typist I 

Mrs. Marie F. Schumann Clerk-Typist I 

Mrs. Hanna Z. Streett Clerk-Typist I 

Florence M. Brady Clerical Assistant 

Division of Administration and Finance 

Paul D. Cooper, Assistant State Superintendent 

John W. Powder, Jr Supervisor of Finance 

Eleanor G. Weagly Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

George A. Myers Supervisor of School Plant Planning 

Morris W. Rannels Supervisor of Transportation 

Charles V. Akeley Assistant Supervisor of Finance 

Bernard G. Geyer Assistant Supervisor of Finance 

J. Harwood Naylor Assistant Supervisor of Finance 

Walter F. Edwards Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Helen D. George Editor 

Mrs. Mary C. Hoover Accountant II 

Casimer P. Kotowski Auditor II 

Margaret E. Albautrh Administrative Assistant II 

Mrs. Dorothv M. Norris Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Mary B. Prince Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Anida L. England Principal Account Clerk I 

Catherine L. Flahavan Principal Account Clerk I 



3 



Division of Administration and Finance — Continued 

Paul D. Cooper, Assistant State Superintendent 

Mrs. Betty Lou Krieger Principal Account Clerk I 

Phyllis E. Rodgers Principal Account Clerk I 

Mrs. Doris R. Thompson Principal Account Clerk I 

Mrs. Ruth S. Friedland Secretary III 

Carrye Hamburger Secretary III 

Mrs. Dolores B. Jones Secretary I 

Patricia M. Kaiss Stenographer 

Lenore Klein* Secretary I 

Bessie I. Rones Secretary I 

Helen D. Wysocki Secretary I 

Mrs. Agnes V. Bayne Report Typist 

Mrs. Clara P. Haffner Clerk-Typist II 

Lloyd E. Holmes Office Appliance Operator I 

*Half time 

Division of Research and Development — Wesley N. Dorn, Director 

Richard K. McKay Supervisor of Instruction (Research) 

R. Christine Hogan Supervisor of Research 

Mrs. Anne K. Carroll Assistant Supervisor of Research 

Robert M. Bassford Systems Analyst 

Mrs. Mary H. Binebrink Research Assistant II 

Mrs. Genevieve J. Nekervis Research Assistant II 

Mrs. Virginia K. Goldsmith Statistical Assistant 

Mrs. Viola L. Merzbacher Statistical Assistant 

Lillian O. Erpenstein Secretary II 

Lenore Klein* Secretary I 

Mrs. Anastasia T. Lutz Secretary I 

Mrs. Harriett C. Pazourek Clerk I 

Mrs. Doris A. Lombard i Senior Key Punch Operator 

Mrs. Thelma L. Baron Key Punch Operator 

*Half time 

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation 

Robert C. Thompson, Assistant State Superintendent 

W. Bird Terwilliger Assistant Director 

J. Leo Delaney Supervisor of Case Services 

Raymond H. Simmons Supervisor of Field Services 

Merl D. Myers Supervisor of the Mentally Handicapped 

George W. Keller Assistant Supei-visor of Services for the Blind 

Francis J. Borges, M.D.** Medical Adviser 

Charlotte A. Sylvester Secretary III 

Mrs. Ruth-Ellen K. Darnell Administrative Assistant II — 

(Employment of the Handicapped) 

Mrs. Florence B. Ackerman Secretary II 

Alice F. O'Connor Secretary II 

Mrs. Mary Lacher Secretary I 

Mrs. Naomi Shapiro Secretary I 

Eileen J. Ticha Stenographer 

**Part time 

Metropolitan Baltimore Office 

2100 Guilford Avenue, Baltimore 21218 

Thomas D. Braun Supervisor 

Harold B. Hayes Assistant Supervisor 

Ernest C. Allnutt, Jr Counselor II 

Myrtle E. Chell Counselor II 

Mrs. Dorothy C. Clifford Counselor II 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Cochran Counselor II 

James G. Dashiell Counselor II 

J. Bruce Edemy Counselor II 

Niles R. Ellingson Counselor II 

James M. Griffin Counselor II 

Martha R. Harrison Counselor II 

Arthur H. Macqueen Counselor II 

Irwin D. Medinger Counselor II 

William B. Melville Counselor II 

Frank H. Nachman Counselor II 

Charles L. Reis Counselor II 

Ruth F. Ring Counselor II 

Kathleen E. Scheve Counselor II 

Frank M. Skarupa Counselor II 

James D. Smyth Counselor II 

M. Eugene Spurrier Counselor II 

Lawrence E. Williams Counselor II 



4 



Metropolitan Baltimore Office — Continued 



2100 Guilford Avenue, Baltimore 21218 

Emma E. Lueckert Secretary III 

Mrs. Mabel C. Dwyer Secretary I 

M. Eleanor Farnandis Secretary I 

Rhona R. Fox Secretary I 

Mrs. Frances S. Goodwin Secretary I 

Mrs. Melvina A. Jackson Secretary I 

Mrs. N. Helen Maslanka Secretary I 

Mrs. Eleanor M. Mosner Secretary I 

Mrs. Lillian R. Pferdeort Secretary I 

Mrs. Vivien L. Sener Secretary I 

Bell M. Sklar Secretary I 

Doris A. Martin Stenographer 

Dorothy A. Gross Clerk-Typist II 

Mrs. Jean C. Losasso Clerk-Typist I 

Eastern Shore District 

700 East Main Street, Salisbury 21801 

Jack R. Nichols Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Robert M. Davis Counselor II 

William T. Phoebus, Jr Counselor II 

1 — Joseph E. Guschke Counselor II 

2— Frank A. Tar button Counselor II 

1 — Mrs. Ruth K. Lunsford Secretary I 

2— Mrs. Dorothy H. Slagle Secretary I 

Mrs. Anne E. Bishop Secretary I 

Mrs. Mary Lee Harris Secretary I 

1— Stevens Building, 29 Goldsboro Street, Easton 21601 

2— County Building, 400 High Street, Chestertown 21620 

Southern Maryland District 

5106 Baltimore Avenue, Hyattsville 20781 

W. Carroll Walsh Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Hugh F. Bunnell Counselor II 

Charles J. Kilczewski Counselor II 

Joseph A. Proctor Counselor II 

Patricia Ann Wolfe Counselor II 

1— Fedon G. Nides Counselor II 

1 — Myron V. Wotring Counselor II 

2 — Stanley I. Scher Counselor II 

3 — Alfred A. Dion Counselor II 

3 — Mrs. Priscilla J. Henshaw Counselor II 

3— Leif K. Kvalen Counselor II 

3— F. dePaul Whitehurst Counselor II 

1 — Mrs. Jeannette M. Dart .... Secretary I 

2— Mrs. Rebecca H. Clements Secretary I 

3 — Mrs. Virginia A. Burdette Stenographer 

3— Mrs. Joan B. C. Clark Secretary I 

Mrs. Dorothy E. Briley Stenographer 

Mrs. Elizabeth M. Cruz Secretary I 

1 — Speer Building, 3 Church Circle, Annapolis 21401 

2— Court House, La Plata 20646 

3 — 114 Commerce Lane, Room 110, Rockville 20850 

Western Maryland District 

74 West Washing-ton Street, Hagferstown 21740 

H. Dorsey Devlin Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Edward J. Shuck Counselor II 

Andrew J. Ungvarsky Counselor II 

1 — John M. Cobun Counselor II 

2 — Stanley Hamilton, Jr Counselor II 

2 — Kenneth L. Kuester Counselor II 

3— William C. Hill Counselor II 

1 — Mrs. Betty J. Lovenstein ( half-tiim-) Secretary I 

2 — Darlene E. Close Stenographer 

3— Mrs. Elizabeth K. Baker Secretary I 

Mrs. Alfreda E. Coffman Secretary I 

Mrs. Annie G. McCarthy Secretary I 

1— P. O. Box 504, 111 Union Street, Cumberland 21501 

2— P. O. 121, City Hall, Westminster 21157 

3— Board of Education, 115 East Church Street, Frederick 21701 



5 



Disability Determinations Program 
(Old Ag*e and Survivors' Insurance) 
10 East Fayette Street, Baltimore 21202 

Robert L. Burton Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Ernest C. Bersch Counselor I 

Lawrence E. Brown Counselor I 

Anne M. Daly Counselor I 

Jane R. Dummer Counselor I 

Minnie Gerber Counselor I 

Roger D. Griest Counselor I 

James L. Keelan Counselor I 

Mrs. Marilyn D. Sellman Counselor I 

Andrew A. Lewandowski, M.D.* Medical Adviser 

Hilary T. O'Herlihy, M.D.* Medical Adviser 

Anderson M. Renick, M.D.* Medical Adviser 

S. J. Venable, M.D.* Medical Adviser 

Elizabeth B. DePolo Secretary I 

Mrs. Julia A. Fanning Secretary I 

Mrs. Mary C. Maples Secretary I 

Mrs. Gladys M. Matthews Secretary I 

Betty Lee Block Transcribing Machine Operator 

Anita Haman Transcribing Machine Operator 

Joan G. Piekarski Transcribing Machine Operator 

Sondra L. White Transcribing Machine Operator 

*Part time 



MARYLAND TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 
State Office Building" 
301 West Preston Street, Baltimore 21201 
Board of Trustees and Office Staff 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., Chairman of the Board State Superintendent of Schools 

Louis L. Goldstein, Vice Chairman of the Board State Comptroller 

Mrs. Mary S. Ellis, Member of the Board Supervisor of Instruction, 

Board of Education of Wicomico County 

B. Melvin Cole, Member of the Board Director of Elementary Education, 

Baltimore County 

John A. Luetkemeyer, Member of the Board State Treasurer 

Christ G. Christis Director 

Stanley Katzen Assistant Director 

Edgar T. Pfaff Accountant I 

Lewis L. Tignor Investment Administrator 

Mildred Potash Accounting Staff 

Ida Rosenberg Accounting Staff 

Ruth Connell Principal Account Clerk II 

Eva Shagogue Secretary I 

Mary Lou Druery Investment Staff 

Donald Patterson Accounting Staff 

Mrs. Mildred Scott Principal Account Clerk I 

Mrs. Edna Doyle Accounting Machine Operator 

Mrs. Anna M. Novak Accounting 1 Machine Operator 

Mrs. Anne Trhlik Graphotype Operator 

Janice Sappington Clerk Typist I 

Daniel Christopher Senior Account Clerk 

STATE-AIDED PUBLIC LIBRARIES IN MARYLAND 

County Library Librarian 

Allegany Allegany County Library, Cumberland Rollin P. Marquis 

Anne Arundel . .Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Library, 

Annapolis Esther K. King 

Baltimore City . .Enoch Pratt Free Library Edwin Castagna 

Baltimore Baltimore County Library, Towson Charles M. Robinson 

Calvert Calvert County Public Library, 

Prince Frederick Stella M. Loeffler 

Caroline Caroline County Public Library. Denton William N. Rairigh 

Carroll Carroll County Public Library, Westminster . . .Rudolph J. Aubinger 

Cecil Cecil County Public Library, Elkton Dorothy W. Jefferson 

Charles Charles County Public Library, La Plata Stella M. Loeffler 

Dorchester Dorchester County Public Library, Cambridge. .Mrs. Ethel L. Bruya 

Frederick C. Burr Artz Library, Frederick Josephine P. Etchison 

Garrett Ruth Enlow Library of Garrett County, 

Oakland Edith G. Brock 

Harford Harford County Public Library, Bel Air Roenna Fahrney 

Howard Howard County Public Library, Ellicott City . .Marvin Thomas 

Kent Kent County Public Library, Chestertown William N. Rairigh 







STATE-AIDED PUBLIC LIBRARIES IN MARYLAND— Continued 

Montgomery Montgomery County Department of Public 

Libraries, Gaithersburg George B. Mor eland 

Prince George's. .Prince George's County Memorial Library, 

Bladensburg Elizabeth B. Hage 

Queen Anne's . .Queen Anne's County Free Library, 

Centrcville Mrs. Mary C. Johnston 

St. Mary's St. Mary's County Memorial Library, 

Leonardtown Stella M. Loeffler 

Talbot Talbot County Free Library, Easton Mrs. Elizabeth H. Baker 

Washington ....Washington County Free Library, Hagerstown .. Edward B. Hall 

Wicomico Wicomico County Free Library, Salisbury Mrs. Fred M. Horsley, Jr. 

Worcester Worcester County Library, Snow Hill Mrs. Dorothy G. Moore 



ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY STAFFS 
LOCAL SCHOOL SYSTEMS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY 

108 Washing-ton Street, Cumberland 21502 

Ralph R. Webster Superintendent of Schools 

Richard T. Rizer Assistant Superintendent and Supervisor of High Schools 

Robert J. Shockley Assistant Superintendent and Director of Curriculum 

Jack A. Petry Supervisor of High Schools 

Margaret E. Doak Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Elizabeth I. Flake Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mary E. Straw Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Robert E. Pence Supervisor of Physical Education 

LaVern J. Hahn Supervisor of Music Education 

Theodore P. Foote Supervisor of Art Education 

Ruth C. McColly Supervisor of Home Economics Education 

Julius D. Lonnholm Supervisor of Vocational, Industrial, and Adult Education 

J. Hubert Radcliffe Supervisor of Transportation 

Joseph T. Downey Supervisor of Maintenance 

Gladys Miller Eaton Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Homer S. Higgins Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Esther M. Carter Visiting Teacher 

Glenn U. Hanna Visiting Teacher 

Eugene J. Hopkins Visiting Teacher 

Elizabeth Dixon Pitcher Financial Secretary and Office Manager 

Helen Burnett Dickerhoof Secretary to the Superintendent 



ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY 

P.O. Box 951, Green Street, Annapolis 21404 

David S. Jenkins Superintendent of Schools 

R. Harold McCann Assistant Superintendent — -Administration 

Richard R. Clopper Assistant Superintendent — Secondary Schools 

Ruth V. Dudderar Assistant Superintendent — Elementary Schools 

Fred L. Alexander Director of Planning 

Frank C. Gunderloy Director of School Facilities 

Robert S. Shaffner Director of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Eva M. Pumphrey Director of Curriculum 

Grady L. Ballard Director of Personnel and Research 

Mrs. Eleanor B. Waring Director of Special Services for Children 

Katharine Kibler Supervisor of Publications 

Ernest H. HerHotz Supervisor of Purchasing 

Mrs. Madolyn R. Leonard Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Dennis W. Turner Supervisor of Maintenance 

Frank G. Baker, Jr Supervisor of Transportation 

Leviah Daniel Supervisor of Instruction. Elementary Schools 

Robert Doenges Supervisor of Instruction. Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Winifred Fowler Supervisor of Instruction, Elementary Schools 

Sarah V. Jones Supervisor of Instruction. Elementary Schools 

Carl Mauro Supervisor of Instruction, Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Virginia D. Moore Supervisor of Instruction. Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Ruby G. Myers Supervisor of Instruction, Elementary Schools 

Everett Pettigrew Supervisor of Instruction. Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Evelyn P. Reed Supervisor of Instruction. Elementary Schools 

H. Elizabeth Slater Supervisor of Instruction. Elementary Schools 

Alfred Bisset. Jr Supervisor of Instruction, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Carroll Supervisor of Instruction, Secondary Schools 

Wayne M. Cornwell Supervisor of Instruction, Secondary Schools 

James W. Dunaean Supervisor of Instruction, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Katherine K. Frantum Supervisor of Instruction, Secondary School* 

Douglas S. King Supervisor of Instruction, Secondary Schools 

Edward Konick Supervisor of Instruction, Secondary Schools 



7 



ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Norma Mezick Supervisor of Instruction, Secondary Schools 

Betty J. Mitchell Supervisor of Instruction, Secondary Schools 

Roland Olson Supervisor of Instruction, Secondary Schools 

Joshua M. Potter Supervisor of Instruction, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Mary Rossworm Supervisor of Instruction, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Glorious Shenton Supervisor of Instruction, Secondary Schools 

Dorothy Noble Supervisor of Social Studies 

Doris Clements Supervisor of Home Economics 

Richard D. Carlson Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Margaret A. Adams Supervisor of Music 

William J. Callaghan Supervisor of Physical Education 

Mary E. Wellham Supervisor of Art 

Annabelle Ferguson Supervisor of Guidance 

Mrs. Nancy C. Walker Supervisor of Libraries 

Mrs. Thelma Sparks Supervisor of Mathematics 

H. Allan Foutty Supervisor of Science 

Mrs. Mary Tronsue Supervisor of Business Education 

Albert VanMetre Supervisor of Adult and Summer Education 

Leonard Woolf Supervisor of English 

Mary E. Moss Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Nancy Zastrow Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Mary Schanberger Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Lorelle Machen Supervisor of Psychological Services 

John Malcolm Psychologist 

George Meissler Psychologist 

Dorothy Moskowitz Psychologist 

Leon Kreitman Psychologist 

Marne L. Groff* Psychologist 

Mrs. Billie Lustgarten* Psychologist 

Lois Rogers Assistant Supervisor of Music 

John Albert Supervisor of Construction 

Lawrence P. Bonari Assistant Supervisor — Transportation 

Henry G. Weaver Assistant Supervisor — Custodial Services 

Howard C. Rinehart . ..Assistant Supervisor — Custodial Services 

Jack Ewald Budget and Fiscal Officer 

Jack Hogsten Assistant Director of Planning 

B. Lewis Langdon Assistant in Personenl 

Mrs. Mary C. Brown Visiting Teacher 

Berry Carter "Visiting Teacher 

Alice Gilbert Visiting Teacher 

Esther Hamilton Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elaine Huggins Visiting Teacher 

John Anderson Visiting Teacher 

Edward Miller Visiting Teacher 

Jay Orr Visiting Teacher 

Paul Acito Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Annie S. Witheridge Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elizabeth Strohl Secretary of Certification 

Mrs. Elizabeth Clopper Curriculum Librarian 

*Part time 



BALTIMORE CITY 

3 East 25th Street, Baltimore 21218 

George B. Brain Superintendent of Schools 

Edwin Stein Deputy Superintendent 

Mary A. Adams Assistant Superintendent, Elementary Education 

Houston R. Jackson Assistant Superintendent. Punil Personnel and Staff Services 

John W. Lewis Assistant Superintendent, Business Management 

Walter A. Maccubbin. 

Assistant Superintendent. Staff Personnel and General Administrative Services 
Vernon S. Vavrina. .Assistant Superintendent. Secondary, Vocational, and Adult Education 

Clarence J. Gittings Administrative Assistant, General Administration 

Edward H. Goldstein Administrative Assistant, General Administration 

Robert C. Llovd Coordinator. Citizens School Advisory Committee 

Richard L. Micherdzinski Director of Art Education 

M. Thomas Goedeke Director of Business Management 

Robert H. Nicholson Director of Cafeterias 

Fdith V. Walker Director of Elementary Education 

Vivian I. Cord Area Director of Elementary Education 

Edward A. Gersuk Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Pearl W. Goetz Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Marion C. Johnson Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. E. Romaine Jones Area Director of Elementary Education 

Beatrice Rawlings Area Director of Elementary Education 

Elmon L. Vernier Director of Phvsical Education 

M. Bernice Wiese Director of Library Services 

James M. Magill Director of Music Education 



8 



BALTIMORE CITY (Cont'd) 

Kenneth Horvath Director of Personnel 

Angela M. Broening Director of Bureau of Publications 

Albert G. Packard Director of Educational Testing Services 

Herbert Stern Director of Guidance and Placement 

Ambrose J. Chlada Director of School Facilities 

Arthur Lichtenstein Director of Special Services for Pupils 

H. Spilman Burns Director of Business Services 

Orlando F. Furno Director of Research 

Sidney N. Chernak Director of Secondary Schools 

William J. Hucksoll Director of Vocational Education 

Wilmer V. Bell Director of Adult Education 

Harrie M. Selznick Director of Special Education 

Sylvester H. O'Grince Director of School Buildings and Grounds 

Art Education 

Richard L. Micherdzinski Director of Art Education 

Mrs. Helga Hermann Supervisor of Art, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lillian B. Reid Supervisor of Art, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Pauline D. Smith Supervisor of Art, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Elizabeth "Walton Supervisor of Art, Elementary Education 

George F. Horn Supervisor of Art, Secondary Education 

Mrs. Virginia Timmons Supervisor of Art, Secondary Education 

Business Management 

John W. Lewis Assistant Superintendent 

M. Thomas Goedeke Director of School Business Management 



Cafeterias 



Robert H. Nicholson Director of School Cafeterias 

Mrs. Eloise Payne Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Elizabeth C. Bonthron Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Mrs. Ethel Heubeck Regional Cafeteria Manager 

Evelyn Richardson Regional Cafeteria Manager 

Mrs. May Richardson Regional Cafeteria Manager 

John E. Wall Supervisor of Cafeteria Facilities 

Maurice L. Reilly Business Manager of Cafeterias 

Business Services 

H. Spilman Burns Director of Business Services 

O. Eugene Albright Supervisor of School Accounting 

William F. Bocchetti Accounting Supervisor 

C. Wilson Knauff Stores Supervisor 

Dwight Caskey Supervisor of Educational Equipment 

Frederick W. Kaufman Supervisor of Educational Equipment 

Gustav A. Brandt Senior Administrative Officer 

Wallace C. Kirk Supervisor of Supply and Equipment Administration 

Irvin R. Brose Supervisor of Educational Supplies 

William Myers Supervisor of Educational Supplies 

Carl H. Seth Supervisor of Educational Supplies 

Jack F. Bocher Supervisor of Transportation 

Maintenance and Operation 

Sylvester H. O'Grince Director of School Buildings and Grounds 

Albert W. Clark Supervisor of School Building Operations 

William T. Dorsey Supervisor of School Custodians 

Ernest Gambrill Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Albert F. Hartka Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Elmer P. Jennings Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Louis Kopera Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Edward A. Paris Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Sampson D. Ruffin Supervisor of Building Operations 

Joseph D. Scanlon Supervisor of Building Operations 

Meredith M. Smith Supervisor of Building Operations 

Bernard E. Majerowicz Supervisor of Building Operations 

Peter J. Schaechtel Supervisor of Operating Engineers 

Repair Shop 

Milton B. Malan Supervisor of School Repair Shop 



9 



BALTIMORE CITY (Cont'd) 
Elementary Education 

Mary A. Adams Assistant Superintendent 

Edith V. Walker Director of Elementary Education 

vian I. Cord Area Director of Elementary Education 

Edward Gersuk Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Pearl W. Goetz Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Marion C. Johnson Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. E. Romaine Jones Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Beatrice Rawlings Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Mildred B. Blackwell Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Mary E. Bowman Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Catherine Brunner Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Alice Buehner Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Elizabeth Carr Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Anna Cella Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Charles C. Connor Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Edith Corcoran Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. May G. Cornish Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Audrey J. Davis Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Dolores J. Deardorff Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Dorothy Diehl Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Cleo A. Diggs Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Jean Eifert Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Dorothy A. Farmer Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Kathryn Frisby Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Violet Garren Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Betty Getz Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Bertha Goodman Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Doris L. Hammond Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Louisa Harston Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Gertrude Harwood Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Mary B. James Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Irene Joell Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Ida Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Jeanette Lewis Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mary A. Metz Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Carolyn E. Motschiedler Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Helen A. Nitkoski Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Elaine Nolan Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Peggy C. Nottingham Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Robert F. Palumbi Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Thelma Peregoy Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Alice Pindorhughes Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Inez Reed Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. LaVerna W. Reed Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Louise Robinson Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Daniel Rochowiak Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lillian H. Rose Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Marie B. Schmuck Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Gwendolyn Seaborne Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Edith Stark Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Carrie Staten Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Rena D. Sugar Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Jean S. Taylor Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Louise Tildon Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Florence M. Udel Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Doris H. Wallace Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Rosalie Wells Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Anita E. Woodlon , Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Helena E. Wright Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Sara K. Yudlson Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Instructional Materials 

Clay W. Stall Supervisor of Instructional Materials 



Library Division 

Bernice M. Wiese Director of Library Division 

Harold S. Hanson Supervisor of Library Services 

Lillie G. Patterson Supervisor of Library Services 

Mrs. Alice Rusk Supervisor of Library Services 



10 



BALTIMORE CITY (Cont'd) 

Music Education 

James If. Magill Director of Music Education 

Corwin H. Taylor Supervisor of Instrumental Music Education 

Mrs. Alice S. Beer Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Mrs. Mary Lewis Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Mrs. Jane Parker Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Mrs. Constance E. Pawelek Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Don Regier . Supervisor of Secondary School Vocal Music 

Personnel Division 

Kenneth Horvath Director of Personnel Division 

William C. McClean Supervisor of Personnel 

Walter A. Miller Specialist in Personnel 

Mrs. Osceola S. Ailor Specialist in Personnel 

Ruth Richards Specialist in Personnel 

Louis A. Sedlak Specialist in Personnel 

Physical Education Division 

Elmon L. Vernier Director of Physical Education 

Harry M. Bruce Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Ruth C. Cinsky Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Dorothy V. Horine Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Eloise Thomas Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Leo G. Woods Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Julian Dyke Supervisor of Secondary Physical Education 

Mary Elizabeth McCoy Supervisor of Secondary Physical Education 

Publications Bureau 

Angela M. Broening Director of Publications 



Pupil Personnel Services 

Educational Testing 

Albert G. Packard Director of Educational Testing Services 

Dean W. Forbes Specialist in Elementary Testing 

Neil R. Lovelace Specialist in Educational Testing 

Mary Jane Shapiro Specialist in Educational Testing 

Guidance and Placement 

Herbert Stern Director of Guidance and Placement 

Frederick S. Eyster Supervisor of Guidance and Placement 

Mrs. Carolyn Boston Supervisor of Guidance and Placement 

Mrs. Inez M. Pearson Supervisor of Guidance and Placement 

Lillian Buckingham Department Head of Placement Service 

Special Services 

Arthur Lichtenstein Director of Special Services 

Elizabeth Armstrong Supervisor of School Social Workers 

Paul Yaffe Supervisor of Psychological Services 

Charles Cephas Specialist in School Social Work 

Mrs. Marjorie Everinghim Specialist in School Social Work 

Maxwell J. Frankford Specialist in School Social Work 

Nelva Hobbs Specialist in School Social Work 

Dollie R. Walker Specialist in School Social Work 

Mrs. Eva A. Weisman Specialist in School Social Work 

Mrs. Helen C. Starr Department Head of Home Visitor Service 

Radio and Television 

Mrs. Eleanora B. Kane Supervisor of Radio and TV Education 



11 



BALTIMORE CITY (Cont'd) 

Research Bureau 

Orlando F. Furno Director of Research 

Clara E. Grether Supervisor of Research 

Harry C. Hendrickson Specialist in Research 

Chester Kiser Specialist in Research 

Michael Karas Specialist in Research 

Mrs. Elaine C. Davis Supervisor of Special Projects 

N. Neubert Jaffa Supervisor of Special Projects 

Safety Education 

Frank Bennett Supervisor of Safety Education 

School Facilities 

Ambrose J. Chlada Director of School Facilities 

Herschel H. Newlin Administrative Supervisor of School Facilities 

Secondary, Vocational, and Adult Education 

Vernon S. Vavrina Assistant Superintendent 

Sidney N. Chernak Director of Junior and Senior High Schools 

Alexina C. Stidham Administrative Assistant 

English 

Mrs. Josie G. Smith Supervisor of English 

L. Earl Wellemeyer Supervisor of English 

Milton Velder Supervisor of English 

Mrs. Jean Owens Supervisor of English 

Foreign Languages 

Thomas D. Troy Supervisor of Foreign Languages, Secondary Schools 

Geography 

Leon Klompus Supervisor of Geography, Secondary Schools 

History 

Zelda B. Brenner Supervisor of History, Secondary Schools 

Frank Fairbank Supervisor of History, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Edythe Myers Supervisor of History, Secondary Schools 

Mathematics 

William J. Gerardi Supervisor of Mathematics, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Eunice B. Schmied Supervisor of Mathematics, Secondary Schools 

S. Leroy Taylor Supervisor of Mathematics, Secondary Schools 

Science 

Elra M. Palmer Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

Sidney Blum Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

Robert Buxbaum Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Dorothy Fader Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 



12 



BALTIMORE CITY (Cont'd) 



Vocational Education 

William J. Hucksoll Director of Vocational Education 

E. Duncan Hyde Supervisor of Business Education 

Forest L. Lawton Supervisor of Distributive Education 

Mrs. Nellie B. Nicholson Supervisor of Home Economics 

Suella Harrington Supervisor of Home Economics 

Stanley J. Pawelek Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Carl J. White Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Frank E. Ensminger Supervisor of Vocational-Industrial Education 

Isaac Schkloven Supervisor of Vocational-Industrial Education 

Roland Randall Supervisor of Vocational-Industrial Education 

John G. Edelmann Supervisor of Printing 

Henry C. Johnson Supervisor of Vocational Equipment 

Adult Education 

Wilmer V. Bell Director of Adult Education 

James 0. Proctor Supervisor of Adult Education 

William McK. Rawlings Supervisor of Adult Education 

George R. Uchuck Supervisor of Adult Education 

Special Education 

Harrie M. Selznick Director of Special Education 

Mrs. Lavinia W. Keagle Special Assistant of Special Education 

Mrs. Lois T. Murray Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Elsie Bevens Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Sadie Douglass Supervisor of Special Education 

Morton Esterson Supervisor of Special Education 

Helen Knox Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Lillian Maith Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Koma Stinchcomb Supervisor of Special Education, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Elsie Warrell Supervisor of Special Education 

Louise Young Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Barbara Levine Department Head of Speech Correction 

Mrs. Margaret H. West Secretary to the Superintendent 

BALTIMORE COUNTY 

Aigfburth Manor, Towson 21204 

William S. Sartorius Superintendent of Schools 

Quentin L. Earhart Assistant Superintendent of Instruction 

Joshua R. Wheeler Assistant Superintendent in Administration 

William T. Willis, Jr Assistant Superintendent in Finance 

Morris R. Baker Engineer in Charge of Construction, Operation and Maintenance 

B. Melvin Cole Director of Elementary Education 

Anna G. Shepperd Director of Elementary Education 

Norris A. King Director of Secondary Education 

John B. Shock, Jr Director of Secondary Education 

G. Alfred Helwig Director of Curriculum 

Walter M. Snyder Director of Personnel 

Loyal W. Joos Director of Educational Research and Planning 

Charles M. DeWitt Director of Public Services 

Leon E. Grant Director of Purchasing 

Walter M. Gordon, Sr Director of Transportation 

Jerome Davis Director of Special Education 

Preston L. Grimm Director of Capital Improvement Planning 

Thomas M. Greene Director of Adult Education 

William A. Marshall, III Assistant Engineer in Charge of Construction, 

Operation, and Maintenance 

Josiah A. Blacklock Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Shirley V. Conner Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

M. Katherine Dost Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Clotilde C. Drechsler 1 Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Gene M. Hastings Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Hilda Kestner Supervisor of Elementary- Schools 

Eleanor B. Requard Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Francis A. Stapleton Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Lawrence C. Bolster Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Robert W. Gifford Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Margie B. Handy Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Samuel D. Herman Supervisor of Secondary Schools 



13 



BALTIMORE CITY (Cont'd) 

Stella H. Johnston Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mary E. Saterlie Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Louella H. Woodward Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Vincent C. Brant Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mary R. Childs Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Michael D. Eder Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Helen E. Hale Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Joseph B. Hillyard Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Jean R. Moser Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Carey K. Sentz Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Jean C. Sisk Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Olive T. Jobes Supervisor of Art 

M. Ethel Troyer Supervisor of Art 

Thomas R. Lawrence Supervisor of Music 

Nicholas Geriak Supervisor of Music 

John W. Craft Supervisor of Music 

Harold S. Martin Supervisor of Physical Education 

James L. Miller Supervisor of Physical Education 

Mildred H. Murray Supervisor of Physical Education 

Paul P. Plevyak Supervisor of Business Education 

William J. Kinling Supervisor of Child Accounting 

Clarence F. Leisinger Supervisor of Adult Education 

A. Price Ransone Coordinator, New Building Construction 

Arthur A. Dick Supervisor of Vocational Education 

William F. Kohl, Jr Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

William A. O'Dell Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Mary E. Kelleher Supervisor of Home Economics 

Ruth S. Killian Supervisor of Home Economics 

Frances O. Fleming Supervisor of Library Services 

Elizabeth D. Hodges Supervisor of Library Services 

Gloria L. Engnoth Supervisor of Special Education 

Betty C. Reed Supervisor of Special Education 

Edna T. Warwick Supervisor of Special Education 

Pauline J. Hobbs Supervisor of Reading 

Gilbert B. Schiffrnan Supervisor of Reading 

Margaret S. Farlow Supervisor of Certification 

Charles J. Leiman Supervisor of Clinical Services 

Anna R. Meeks Supervisor of Guidance 

Emma E. Williams Supervisor of Guidance 

William E. Kline Supervisor of Testing 

Louise W. Erlbeck Supervisory of Secondary Nursing Services 

Ruthetta L. Gilgash Supervisor of Food Services 

E. Lyle Root Supervisor of Food Services 

Adele D. Woronka Supervisor of Food Services 

Willard A. Strack Specialist in Audio-Visual Education 

Philip R. Stoer Specialist in Educational Information 

Katherine M. Klier Specialist in Publications 

Lorena F. Simon Specialist in Library Services 

Herman C. Burton Supervisor in Pupil Personnel 

Mildred E. Jones Supervisor of Visiting Teachers 

Richard L. Blaine Visiting Teacher 

Edward A. Bogusko Visiting Teacher 

Amon Burgee, III Visiting Teacher 

Mary H. Carey Visiting Teacher 

Edna M. Congdon Visiting Teacher 

Bowyer E. Forsythe Visiting Teacher 

Robert F. Geckle Visiting Teacher 

Wanda S. Greene Visiting Teacher 

Therma Lee Harris Visiting Teacher 

John J. Hart Visiting Teacher 

Marie J. Hunycutt Visiting Teacher 

Thomas J. Jordon Visiting Teacher 

Irma R. Kell Visiting Teacher 

Frederick R. Keyton Visiting Teacher 

Susan S. Kleis Visiting Teacher 

Eliza S. McDaniel Visiting Teacher 

Vivian S. Mcintosh Visiting Teacher 

Evelyn V. Maus Visiting Teacher 

Frances N. Osgood Visiting Teacher 

Angelo J. Quaranta Visiting Teacher 

Louis S. Sagi Visiting Teacher 

Helen-Louise Scarborough Visiting Teacher 

Mary J. Stoll Visiting Teaeher 

Kathryn B. Stonesifer Visiting Teacher 

Mary A. Van Wiggeren Visiting Teacher 

Mary G. Wheeler Visiting Teacher 

Delores S. Young Visiting Teacher 



14 



BALTIMORE COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Olga D. Cooper Psychologist 

William A. Doyle Psychologist 

Arthur M. Green Psychologist 

Jeston Hamer Psychologist 

Jordan Lawrence Psychologist 

Marion H. Pelton Psychologist 

Roger E. Saunders Psychologist 

Walter E. Schult Psychologist 

Ruth L. Sherman Psychologist 

Sheldon L. Shubert Psychologist 

Dorothy S. Windham Psychologist 

Evelyn C. Norton Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent 

David H. Black Assistant in Planning 

Robert C. Coleman, Jr Assistant in Personnel 

Joe H. Leckrone Assistant in Personnel 

Allen M. Sutton Assistant in Personnel 

Karl V. Sloop Assistant in Audio-Visual Education 

John H. Day, Jr Assistant in Educational Information 

Mary A. Dugan Assistant in Educational Research and Planning 

William C. Feader Supervisor of Accounting 

C. Barry Carpenter Supervisor of School Accounting 

Carroll W. Church Assistant in School Accounting 

E. Brian Fleming Assistant in Accounting 

Charles E. Jockel Assistant in Purchasing 

Thomas M. Wilhelm, Jr Assistant in Purchasing 

Lydia E. Berry Chief, Payroll 

G. LeRoy Black Assistant in Transportation 

Fred C. Donovan Assistant in Transportation 

C. Thomas Dunnock Assistant in Transportation 

Grason E. Fowble Assistant in Transportation 

Edwin A. Rommel, Jr Assistant in Transportation 

Karl F. Swem Assistant in Transportation 

Henry E. Schleisener Director of Grounds 

Herd S. Eburg Supervisor of Plant Operations and Maintenance 

Thomas S. Bowyer Supervisor of Grounds Maintenance 

May S. Williams Area Manager, Food Services 

Elaine B. Isennock Secretary to the Superintendent 

CALVERT COUNTY 

Dares Beach. Road, Prince Frederick 20678 

Maurice A. Dunkle Superintendent of Schools 

Douglas M. Bivens, Jr Director of Instruction 

Mrs. Thelma M. Cornish Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Mildred G. Finlon Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Lola M. Parks Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Lloyd J. Falk Supervisor of Maintenance 

William J. Middleton Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Virginia D. Parran Chief Bookkeeper 

E. Anne Yoe Secretary to Superintendent 

CAROLINE COUNTY 

Law Building 1 , Denton 21629 

Wilbur S. Hoopengardner Superintendent of Schools 

Fred G. Usilton Director of Instruction 

Louise C. Dennison Supervisor of Instruction 

Lewis W. Davis Supervisor of Instruction 

Frederick H. Sheeley Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Richard W. Hall Supervisor of Plant Operations 

George H. Caple Supervisor of Transportation 

Bertha L. Miller Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Virginia M. York Secretary-Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Barbara J. Bacsak Secretary to Superintendent 



15 



CARROLL COUNTY 



County Office Building", Westminster 21157 

Samuel M. Jenness Superintendent of Schools 

Charles I. Ecker Assistant Superintendent of Schools 

John F. Wooden, Jr Director of Instruction, Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Margaret M. Bailer Supervisor of High Schools 

Robert S. Martin, Jr Supervisor of High Schools 

Evan F. Bowers Supervisor of High and Elementary Schools 

Ruth E. DeVore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Charles E. Reck Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mae Prince* Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

George E. Baker Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Josephine D. West Supervisor of Home Economics and School Lunch 

Philip S. Royer* Supervisor of Music 

Maye E. Grimes Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Dolores C. Snyder Supervisor, Guidance, Counseling, Library, Special Services 

Herbert E. Ruby, Jr Visiting Teacher 

Joseph L. Shilling Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elaine G. Alper Speech Therapist 

Roland F. Haifley Assistant in Custodial Service, School Lunch and Maintenance 

Maurice V. Wolfe Assistant in General Maintenance and Utilities 

Mrs. Martha S. Gilbert Office Manager, Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Pauline D. Peterson Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Nadine F. Saylor Assistant Financial Secretary 

CECIL COUNTY 

308 Court House, Elkton 21921 

Robert A. Gibson Superintendent of Schools 

Walter J. Finn Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent 

Richard L. Holler Director of Instruction and Curriculum 

William C. Graham Supervisor of High Schools 

Robert W. Gaddis Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Evelyn P. Kay Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Norman J. Moore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Rachel E. Boyd Supervisor of Home Economics 

Louis P. Wright Supervisor of Industrial Education and Director of Purchasing 

James M. Renn Supervisor of Maintenance 

Samuel Dixon Supervisor of Transportation and Driver Education 

Mrs. Grace B. DuBose Supervisor of Music 

Edwin H. Barnes Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Mary A. Crouse Visiting Teacher 

Robert E. Jaccard Visiting Teacher 

Willard W. Taylor Director of Finance 

George E. Matthews Assistant in Finance 

Dorothy J. Moore Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Rose R. Scheck Reading Specialist 

Mrs. Ruth Craig Audiometrist 

Leslie L. Pippin Building Inspector 

CHARLES COUNTY 

Court House, Charles Street. La Plata 20646 

Fred J. Brown, Jr Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Genevieve S. Brown Supervisor of High Schools 

John W. Manspeaker Supervisor of Science and Mathematics 

Edward C. Turner Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Mary B. Neal Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Christine E. Pearson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Cecelia G. Farrall Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Georgia B. Lucas Visiting Teacher 

Margaret A. Posey Supervisor of School Lunch Program and Purchasing 

Warren H. Deyermond Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Julia C. Totten Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Patricia W. Brown* Speech Therapist 

Mrs. Virginia T. Lowe Speech Therapist 

Mrs. Nancy Martens* Speech Therapist 

* Part time 



1G 



DORCHESTER COUNTY 



403 Hig"h Street, Cambridge 21613 

James G. Busick Superintendent of Schools 

Charles F. Hurley Supervisor of High Schools 

Thomas A. Flowers Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Evelyn E. Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Viola J. Comegys Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

John T. Comer, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

John F. Armstrong Supervisor of Transportation 

John A. Marshall, Jr Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Mary W. LeCompte Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Dorothy S. Stephens Secretary to Superintendent 

FREDERICK COUNTY 

115 East Church Street, Frederick 21701 

James A. Sensenbaugh Superintendent of Schools 

John L. Carnochan, Jr Assistant Superintendent for Instruction 

Herman A. Hauver Director of Pupil Services 

Allen R. Gaddis, III Director of Business Administration 

Duval W. Sweadner* Director of Adult Education 

Karl S. Manwiller Supervisor of High Schools 

Glenn E. Warneking Supervisor of Science and Mathematics 

Mrs. Evelyn F. S. Davis Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Alice M. Love Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Louise F. Thompson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Janice Wickless Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Betty M. Franklin Helping Teacher 

Warren R. Evans Supervisor of Physical Education 

James L. Fisher Supervisor of Music 

Alice L. Robinson Supervisor of Library Service 

Mrs. Mary N. Stultz* Supervisor of Home Economics 

Richard E. Summers Supervisor of Art 

Paul L. Hoff master Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Virginia D. Klos Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Paul E. Fogle Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Joseph E. Rexroad Home Visitor 

Mary E. Fiery Home Visitor 

Tolbert F. Lawyer Supervisor of School Facilities 

H. D. Williams Assistant in Plant Operation 

William J. E. Null Assistant in Plant Maintenance 

John E. Tritt Assistant in Administration (Accounting) 

Mrs. Pauline J. Bowlus Secretary to Superintendent 

GARRETT COUNTY 

40 South Fourth Street, P.O. Box 73, Oakland 21550 

Willard L. Hawkins Superintendent of Schools 

Albert R. Ringer Supervisor of High Schools 

Edwin W. Elias Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

A. B. Dean Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Robert R. Martin Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Margaret S. McComas Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Lucille T. Ludvigsen Secretary to Superintendent 

HARFORD COUNTY 

45 East Gordon Street, Bel Air 21014 

Charles W. Willis Superintendent of Schools 

Alfonso A. Roberty Assistant Superintendent 

George N. Bollinger Administrative Assistant 

William P. Byers Administrative Assistant 

Clinton D. Cutright Administrative Assistant 

Edward J. Plevyak Administrative Assistant 

Ralph H. Morgan Building Engineer 

Howard B. Peters Director of Instruction 

C. Clark Jones Director of Personnel 

*Part time 



17 



HARFORD COUNTY (Cont'd) 



George B. Prettyman, Sr Director of Public Relations 

Violet A. Davis Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Helen M. Fisher Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Jane M. Gent Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Levin R. Heath Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Hunter C. Sutherland Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Richard J. Williams Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Slater W. Bryant, Jr Supervisor of High Schools 

Alden H. Halsey Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Dorothy M. Rowe Supervisor of High Schools 

Thomas L. Smith Supervisor of High Schools 

Annetta G. Wright Supervisor of High Schools 

Earle B. Wagner Supervisor of Science 

Howard R. Cheek Supervisor of Transportation 

John W. Cooney Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 

John R. Walker Supervisor of Industrial Education 

Mary Ellen Kennedy Supervisor of Library Services 

W. Warren Sprouse Supervisor of Music 

James H. Clow, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Charles C. McCullough Visiting Teacher 

John H. Willis, Jr Visiting Teacher 

Joseph F. Snee Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Alice W. Crowl Financial Secretary 

Ann L. Campbell Secretary to Superintendent 

HOWARD COUNTY 

7 Park Avenue, Ellicott City 21043 

John E. Yingling Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mary R. Hovet Director of Instruction and Supervisor of High Schools 

Frank B. Durigg ..Supervisor of High Schools 

Max A. Smith Supervisor of High Schools 

Wilhelmina E. Oldfield Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mary R. White Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

George E. Klinkhamer Supervisor of Elementary Schools and Special Education 

Harry T. Murphy Supervisor of Transportation 

Olive G. Mumford Supervisor of Library Services and Music 

Mrs. Joan H. Weatherholtz Supervisor of Home Economics and School Lunch Program 

Gilbert E. Miller Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Walter D. Phelan Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Irene M. Johnson Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Sara S. Snapp Secretary to Superintendent 

KENT COUNTY 

400 High Street, Chestertown 21620 

Reade W. Corr Superintendent of Schools 

Robert J. Johnson Supervisor of Transportation and High Schools 

Carey E. Lacey Supervisor of High Schools 

Louise Hepbron Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Sara B. Chambers* Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Robert J. Eckert** Supervisor of Guidance and Testing 

Mrs. Madeleine Fennell Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Clara M. Chaires Chief Bookkeeper and Clerk 

Mrs. Shirley Jacob Asst. Bookkeeper and Clerk 

Mrs. Florence C. Ward Secretary to Superintendent 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 

850 North Washing-ton Street, Rockville 20850 

C. Taylor Whittier • Superintendent of Schools 

Homer O. Elseroad Deputy Superintendent of Schools 

James C. Craig Assistant Superintendent for Instructional and Personnel Services 

John A. Permenter Assistant Superintendent for Administration 

J. Edward Andrews, Jr Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent 

Donald E. Deyo Dean, Montgomery Junior College 

•Part time — Also Vice principal at Garnett Elementary School (half-time) 
**Part time — Guidance counselor at the CHestertown High School 



18 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY (Cont'd) 

James C. Falcon Budget Supervisor 

Joseph R. Manno Methods and Procedures Analyst 

Mrs. Mary G. Walters Assistant Secretary to the Board of Education 

Maxwell E. Burdette Director, Research 

Samuel M. Goodman Assistant Director, Research 

Thomas V. Bilek Supervisor, Research 

Mrs. Helen P. Bready Area Supervisor 

John P. Causey Area Supervisor 

Henry C. Gregory Area Supervisor 

Mrs. Ruth S. Gue Area Supervisor 

Robert S. Jackson Area Supervisor 

John M. King Area Supervisor 

Theophil K. Muellen Area Supervisor 

Bob R. Nichols Area Supervisor 

Martha A. Satterfield Area Superviser 

Ernest W. Snodgrass Area Supervisor 

Joseph J. Tarallo Area Supervisor 

William C. Feddeman Director, Supervisory Services 

Frances M. Hanson General Supervisor 

Mrs. Louise S. Walker General Supervisor 

Etheleen Daniel Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mary L. Grau Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mary F. Mitchell Supervisor, E ementary Education 

Philip E. Arsenault Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Mrs. Genevieve S. Blew* Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Edmund T. Burke Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Kieran J. Carroll Supervisor, Secondary Education 

William J. Fleming Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Noble V. Fritz Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Edmund S. Hoffmaster, Jr Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Elwood B. Mason Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Charles M. Proctor, Jr Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Louise G. Winfield Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Crescent J. Bride Supervisor, Physical Education 

Mrs. Norma C. Day Supervisor, Adult Education 

Katherine B. Greaney Supervisor, Language Arts 

Charles T. Horn Supervisor, Music 

Mrs. Marjorie E. Jarvi Supervisor, Reading Services 

James D. Morgan Supervisor, Testing 

Leonard T. Oass Supervisor, Industrial Education 

Mitchell V. Owens Supervisor, Health and Safety 

Mrs. Wretha K. Peterson Supervisor, Special Class 

Chester J. Petranek Supervisor, Music 

William R. Porter Supervisor, Special Education 

Jacob Rabinovich Supervisor, Social Studies 

Barbara L. Riley Supervisor, Physical Education 

Kenneth W. Rollins Supervisor, Guidance 

Mrs. Hazel A. Smith Supervisor, Music 

Mrs. Marjorie B. St. Clair Supervisor, Art 

James R. Ward Supervisor, Field Studies 

Julia W. Watkins Supervisor, Home Arts 

Elizabeth C. Wilson Director, Curriculum Development 

Richard E. Collier Assistant Director, Curriculum Development 

Mrs. Marion C. Beckwith Acting Assistant Director, Curriculum Development 

Alan L. Dodd Supervisor, Curriculum Development 

James W. Jacobs Director, Instructional Materials 

Edward W. Barth Manager, Central Processing Center 

Robert E. Schneider Director, Educational Diagnostic Center 

Mrs. Helen L. Kohut Supervisor, Educational Diagnostic Center 

T. H. Owen Knight Director, Pupil Services 

William H. Ashbaugh Supervisor, Psychological Services 

Mrs. Cicely C. Battison Psychological Counselor 

Mrs. Ruth W. Beebe Psychological Counselor 

Mrs. Louisa R. Bilon Psychologist 

William C. Daly Psychologist 

Michael A. Deem Psychologist 

Mrs. Viviane D. Durell Psychologist 

B. Miller Eves Psychologist 

Gilbert Ghitelman Psychologist 

Paul H. Humphreys Psychologist 

Mrs. Kate C. Kern Psychologist 

Mrs. Ruth H. Linn Psychologist 

♦Part time 



19 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY (Cont'd) 



Enzo J. Monti Psychologist 

Stewart G. Pennington Psychologist 

Mrs. Blanche D. Rochmes Psychologist 

Allen S. Rowe Psychologist 

Donald T. Schaeffer Psychologist 

Mrs. Charlotte M. Simos Psychologist 

Leonard Small Psychologist 

Mrs. Mary Jo Smith Psychologist 

Martin W. Spickler Psychologist 

George Usdansky Psychologist 

Ernest C. Young Psychologist 

Reno A. Continetti Area Supervisor, Pupil Personnel 

Robert C. Henley Area Supervisor, Pupil Personnel 

Weymouth H. Judkins Area Supervisor, Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Edith P. Popenoe Area Supervisor, Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Marjorie L. Van Dien Area Supervisor, Pupil Personnel 

Richard A. Cleveland Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Mildred D. Cooper Pupil Personnel Worker 

Robert F. Fioramonti Pupil Personnel Worker 

Jewel A. Greene Pupil Personnel Worker 

John H. Grentzner Pupil Personnel Worker 

Edward A. Hebda Pupil Personnel Worker 

Raymond P. Henry Pupil Personnel Worker 

Andrew L. Hugar Pupil Personnel Worker 

Joseph E. Jodl Pupil Personnel Worker 

John E. McCue Pupil Personnel Worker 

Carl E. Mitchell Pupil Personnel Worker 

William B. Prigg Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Hope M. Reid Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Geraldine M. Reynolds Pupil Personnel Worker 

Joseph A. Sagneri Pupil Personnel Worker 

Henry T. Shetterly Pupil Personnel Worker 

Arthur E. Spaulding Pupil Personnel Worker 

Harold R. Veit Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Eileen D. Wilkinson Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Marie H. Wilson Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Esther F. Samler ...Supervisor, Pupil Appraisal and Placement 

William A. Early Director, Personnel 

Rufus C. Browning Assistant Director, Personnel 

Mrs. Irma B. Dumford Supervisor, Personnel (Elementary) 

Robert G. McCord Supervisor, Personnel (Evaluations) 

Gerald G. Reymore Supervisor, Personnel (Certification) 

Forrest G. Shearin, Jr Supervisor, Personnel (Secondary) 

Charles A. Walker ..Supervisor, Personnel (Supporting Services) 

Mrs. Helen M. Johnson Director, Staff Development 

Paul A. Henry Director, School Services 

Anton N. Suttora Director, Procurement 

Mason A. Nelson Director, Supply 

Richard M. Ream Director, Transportation 

George V. Menke Director, Operations 

L. Jerome Offutt Assistant Director, Operations 

Mrs. Corelli A. David Director, School Lunch 

Mrs. Jane B. Boyd Assistant Director, School Lunch 

Joseph G. DiCarlo Assistant Director, School Lunch 

Lester J. Welch Director, School Facilities 

William M. Miles Acting Director, Planning 

Henry J. Hilburn Assistant Director, Planning 

Gardner B. Jordan Director, Site Acquisition 

James H. Sheldon Director, Construction 

Frank Snyder Assistant Director, Construction 

James L. Mullinix Director Maintenance 

Brian M. Benson Director, Financial Services 

Reginald J. Crockett Assistant Director, Financial Services 

Richard B. Grove Assistant Director, Financial Services 

V. Wilson Campbell Director, Accounting 

Wilton L. Kennedy Director, Auditing 

H. Douglas Hall Director, Data Processing 

Charles W. Hoover Systems Analyst 

J. Gordon McDonald, Jr Director, Insurance and Federal Aid 

Alfred B. Rico Director, Payroll 

Mrs. Helen S. Joseph Secretary to the Superintendent of Schools 



20 



PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY 

Upper Marlboro 20870 

William S. Schmidt Superintendent of Schools 

Rowannetta S. Allen Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Elementary Education 

George H. Robinson Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Secondary Education 

Thomas S. Gwynn, Jr Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Supporting Services 

Edward S. Beach, Jr Director of Curriculum and In-Service Training Program 

Arthur E. Robinson Director of School Construction 

Katherine Fossett Director of Pupil Services 

Kalman J. Vozar Director of School Business Affairs and Office Manager 

Margaret A. Beardsley Supervisor of Kindergartens 

Emma M. Bowman Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Eunice E. Burdette Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Rita M. Donovan Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

William W. Hall Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Leila V. Hardesty Supervisor of Elementary School* 

Lawrence Hervey Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

A. Mildred Hoyle Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Elisabeth C. Kelly Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Thomas Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Elizabeth McMahon Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Louise C. Rymer Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Stella Spicknall Supervisor of Reading and Study Skills 

Mrs. Helen H. Brashears Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Nelda Davis Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Gladys Longley Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Bruce Hoak Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Dora Kennedy Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Truman S. Klein Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Steven Lutz Assistant Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Howard B. Owens Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Mary S. Snouffer Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Katherine Flynn Coordinator of School- Work Experience Programs 

Russell Olson Coordinator-Adult Education Program and the Evening High School 

Mrs. Mary Beth Wackwitz Supervisor of Art Education 

Ronald Uhl Supervisor of Audio-Visual Education 

Mary A. Thompson Supervisor of Health Education and Health Services 

M. Gladys Dickerson Supervisor of Home Economics 

Samuel Geissenhainer Supervisor of Industrial and Vocational Education 

Mrs. Louise B. Bennett Supervisor of Libraries 

Mrs. Frances H. Lynch Supervisor of Music 

Vincent C. Holochwost Supervisor of Physical Education 

Ada Mae Warrington Supervisor of Physical Education 

C. Elizabeth Rieg Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Frances R. Fuchs Assistant Supervisor of Special Education 

Margaret Conant Coordinator-Teacher and Parent Child Study Programs 

Eugenia Balsley Supervisor of Publications 

Francis Parker Coordinator-Safety Education Activities 

Victor Rice Supervisor-Testing and Research 

Mrs. June Baker School Psychologist 

Kevin P. Dwyer School Psychologist 

Mrs. Martha Odell School Psychologist 

Mrs. Jane Austin Helping Librarian 

Helen Bowman Helping Librarian 

Emily M. Durrett Helping Librarian 

William Laslo Helping Teacher ( Science i 

Nancy McNary Helping Teacher (Music) 

Yvonne Moore Helping Teacher (Core) 

Thomas Paskalides Helping Teacher (Physical Education) 

Conrad Seeboth Helping Teacher (Mathematics) 

John A. Woods Helping Teacher (Core) 

David Young Helping Teacher (Art) 

Marian E. Lobdell Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Charles Wendorf Assistant Supervisor — Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Edna Arnn Pupil Personnel Worker 

Donald R. Burgess Pupil Personnel Worker 

Philip Cifizzari Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Zelda Dunlap Pupil Personnel Worker 

Edward Felegy Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Elizabeth W. Hamilton Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Jane Hammill Pupil Personnel Worker 

Roger W. Hart Pupil Personnel Worker 

Willie Mae Henson Pupil Personnel Worker 

William R. Hinely Pupil Personnel Worker 

Harry T. Hughes Liaison-Juvenile Court 

Mrs. Barbara R. Jones Pupil Personnel Worker 

M. Dorothy Jump Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Ethel L. Kirchmer Pupil Personnel Worker 



21 



PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Mrs. Arlene A. Korn Pupil Personnel Worker 

Otha Myers Pupil Personnel Worker 

Richard A. Myers . Pupil Personnel Worker 

Robert C. Nabors Pupil Personnel Worker 

Jon F. Peterson Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Charlotte Spencer Pupil Personnel Worker 

John P. Spicer Pupil Personnel Worker 

Elmer K. Zeller Supervisor of Purchasing 

D. Carl McMillen Director of Personnel and Credentials 

J. Howard Skidmore Supervisor of Personnel and Credentials, Elementary Division 

Florence Spicknall Supervisor of Personnel and Credentials, Secondary Division 

James Panor Planning Specialist 

Alan Poole Supervisor of Maintenance 

Lorton Layman Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Leon Stout Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Daniel Wagner Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Franklin B. Klase Supervisor of Plant Operation 

William H. Smith Building Inspector 

Henry M. Potter Building Inspector 

Flora Schroyer Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Mrs. Dolores Edelin Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Mrs. Sarah A. Reohr Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Mrs. Margaret Young Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

John W. Heim Director of Transportation 

Leroy Contee Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 

Russell O. Eckert Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 

Anthony R. Miller Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 

Ruth Jefferson Assistant Treasurer 

Mrs. Helen S. Bowie Secretary to Superintendent 

QUEEN ANNE'S COUNTY 
Centreville 21617 

Harry C. Rhodes Superintendent of Schools 

John E. Miller Supervisor of Transportation and High School Supervisor 

Mrs. Alberta C. Browne Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Margaret S. Stack , Elementary Supervisor 

John H. Webb High School Supervisor 

M. Rogers Smith Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Marie Shortall Financial Secretary 

Donna Harrington Stenographer 

ST. MARY'S COUNTY 
Leonardtown 20650 

Robert E. King, Jr Superintendent of Schools 

James H. Ogden Assistant Superintendent and Director of Instruction 

E. Violette Young Supervisor of Instruction 

Edward Siemasko Supervisor of Instruction 

Ralph S. Waters Supervisor of Instruction 

Jane G. Mattingly Supervisor of Instruction 

Harriet H. Reeder Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Beulah S. Bennett Visiting Teacher 

Stanley O. Schrader Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Dolores G. Rose Coordinator of Cafeteria Services 

Mrs. Elberta W. Hayden Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Amanda M. Gabbe Financial Assistant 

Mrs. Marie B. Burroughs Stenographer 

Lloyd E. Johnston Maintenance Engineer 

Paul T. Hannen Assistant Maintenance Engineer 

SOMERSET COUNTY 

Court House Annex, Princess Anne 21853 

John L. Bond Superintendent of Schools 

Alice Mae Beauchamp Supervisor Elementary Schools 

George F. Carrington Supervisor High Schools 

Kermit A. Cottman Supervisor High and Elementary Schools 

Charles O. Burns, Jr Supervisor Pupil Services 

Clarence N. Baughan Supervisor of Transportation 

Alva B. Laird Financial Secretary 

Marian T. Colborn Secretary to the Superintendent 



22 



TALBOT COUNTY 



P.O. Box 1029, Eastern 21601 

Gerald E. Richter Superintendent of Schools 

Arthur R. Higginbottom Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Lillian C. Davis Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Kathleen A. Francis Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Margie Slaughter Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

P. Kennard Wright Supervisor of Maintenance 

Edward E. Motovidlak Supervisor of Transportation 

Randolph L. Dunham Controller 

Sallie Ann Yater Secretary 



WASHINGTON COUNTY 

Commonwealth Avenue, Hag'erstown 21740 

William M. Brish Superintendent of Schools 

William C. Diehl Assistant Superintendent 

William L. Donaldson Assistant Superintendent 

T. Wilson Cahall Administrative Assistant 

Russell L. Kepler Director of Operational Services 

Carl M. Mann Director of Purchasing 

Douglas M. Bivens Director of Curriculum and Supervision 

F. Richard Crowther Director of Finances 

Victor R. Martin Director of Pupil Services 

Carl R. Beer Supervisor of Senior High Schools 

Alva D. Temple Supervisor of Junior High School 

Annilea H. Browne Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

M. Frances Grimes Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

C. Scott Couchman Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Miriam L. Hoffman Supervisor of Music 

H. Edwin Semler Supervisor of Physical Education 

Alfred C. Roth, Jr Supervisor of Industrial and Vocational Education 

Claude B. Brubeck Supervisor of Driver Education and Safety 

Catherine L. Beachley Supervisor of Guidance and Research 

W. Harland Biggs Supervisor of Plant Operation 

Joseph H. Vance Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Anormallee M. Way Supervisor of School Lunch 

W. Carlton Parsley School Lunch Assistant 

Robert F. Lesher Supervisor of Audio-Visual (Coordinator, Closed-Circuit 

Television Instruction) 

George H. Ropp Supervisor of Instruction (Closed-Circuit Television Instruction) 

Wilbur G. Kelly Engineer (Closed-Circuit Television Instruction) 

Mrs. Frances H. Machen Visiting Teacher 

Mary E. Byer Visiting Teacher 

James R. Lemmert Visiting Teacher 

Charles W. Ridenour Visiting Teacher 

Theodore S. Hull Puchasing Assistant 

Frank M. Harlacher, Jr Coordinator of Public Information and Publications 

Mrs. Lois R. Malott Secretary to Superintendent 



WICOMICO COUNTY 

Court House, Main Street, Salisbury 21801 

Royd A. Mahaffey Superintendent of Schools 

Sheldon B. Dawson Assistant Superintendent 

Harold A. Fulton Director of Instruction 

Charles R. Berry Supervisor of Instruction 

Marie A. Dashiell Supervisor of Instruction 

Mrs. Mary S. Ellis Supervisor of Instruction 

Martha R. Jones Supervisor of Instruction 

Clarence P. McKinley, Jr Supervisor of Instruction 

Louise L. Mitchell Supervisor of Instruction 

Frederick H. Spigler, Jr Supervisor of Instruction 

Warren D. Bloodsworth, Jr Visiting Teacher 

Richard B. Sheridan, Jr Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Cora G. Smith Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

H. Victor Keen, Jr Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Louise H. Francis Supervisor of Instruction — Television 

Joanna Lankford Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Geneva D. Purnell Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Louise L. Layfield Bookkeeper-Clerk 

Mrs. Juanita T. Lewis Secretary to Superintendent 



23 



WORCESTER COUNTY 



County Service Building 1 , Market Street, Snow Hill 21863 

Paul S. Hyde Superntendent of Schools 

Harvey N. Hall Supervisor of High Schools 

Alfred S. Hancock Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Louise S. Adkins Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Frederick D. Fletcher Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Wilbur A. Jones Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Ernest G. Holland Assistant Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Robert H. Layman Supervisor of Maintenance and Plant Operation 

Benjamin W. Nelson Supervisor of Transportation 

Elsie M. Dryden Clerk 



24 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Letter of Transmittal 26 

Legislation Affecting Education 27 

Notes from the Minutes of the State Board of Education 30 

Administrative Divisions of the State Department of Education: 

Instruction 57 

Library Extension 72 

Vocational Education 76 

Certification and Accreditation 82 

Administration and Finance 88 

Research and Development 91 

Vocational Rehabilitation 96 

Statistical Tables 

Dates of Opening and Closing Schools, Length of Session 99 

Enrollment, Teaching Staff, Number of Public and Nonpublic Schools.... 100 

Number of Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools 101 

Grade Enrollment 102 

Births in Maryland 110 

Handicapped Children, Schools and Classes for Atypical Children Ill 

Withdrawals from Public Schools 120 

Nonpromotions in Public Schools 121 

High School Graduates: Number, Occupations, Colleges Attended 124 

High School Enrollment by Subject 143 

Enrollment in Individual High School Subjects 144 

Teachers by: Average Number Belonging, Summer School Attendance, 
Subject Taught, Experience, Certification, Preparation, Resigna- 
tions, Source 168 

Costs of Maryland Schools: 

State Minimum Program 202 

Per Cent from Each Source 203 

Per Cent Distribution 206 

Cost per Pupil 210 

Average Salary per Teacher and Principal 213 

Transportation 216 

School Lunch, Special Milk 218 

Capital Outlay, Value of School Property, Bonded Indebtedness 222 

Local Revenue, Assessed Valuation 226 

Federal Fund Expenditures 230 

Vocational Education Expenditures 231 

High School Equivalence 232 

Adult Education Expenditures 233 

Community College Enrollments 239 

Vocational Rehabilitation 240 

Maryland Public Libraries 244 

Financial Statements 246 

Pupils and Positions in Public and Nonpublic Schools 249 

Financial Tables 265 

Detailed Public High School Tables 280 

Index 297 



25 



January 1, 1965 



The Honorable J. Millard Tawes 
Government House 
Annapolis, Maryland 

Dear Governor Tawes: 

In accordance with the provision of the laws of Maryland, I 
have the honor to present to you herewith the ninety-eighth 
"annual report covering all operations of the State Department 
of Education and the support, conditions, progress and needs 
of education throughout the State" for the period beginning 
July 1, 1963, and ending June 30, 1964. 

With this report the State Department of Education pays 
tribute to Dr. Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., who retired on June 1, 1964, 
as State Superintendent of Schools. Dr. Pullen has been a cour- 
ageous and outstanding leader in education and has devoted 
thirty-eight years of his life to the school children and teachers 
of Maryland. 

In the twenty-two years which spanned the work of Dr. Pullen 
as State Superintendent of Schools in Maryland, new and excit- 
ing milestones in the history of education of this State were 
reached. Under his leadership there was a continuous pressing 
forward to develop more effective programs of instruction at the 
various educational levels. 

Dr. Pullen's career as an educator has made a difference in 
the lives of countless thousands of individuals in all walks of 
life in the State of Maryland and across the nation. He typifies 
the great teacher who ministers to the needs of all with a deep 
and abiding interest. His contribution to mankind has been a 
great one and because of it the State of Maryland is a more 
enlightened place in which to live. 

It is with pleasure that I submit this Annual Report of the 
Maryland State Department of Education to you. 

Respectfully submitted, 
James A. Sensenbaugh 



Secretary-Treasurer 
State Board of Education 
Baltimore, Maryland 



20 



Maryland State Department of Education 



27 



1964 MARYLAND LEGISLATION AFFECTING EDUCATION* 

Regular Session 

School Buses 

Chapter 4, House Bill 126, adds new section to Article 6QV2, providing that 
a school bus driver, who is a member of a retirement system, may 
continue his regular work until the end of the current school year in 
which his mandatory retirement date falls. 

Higher Education 

Chapter 9, Senate Bill 62, amends Article 43A, changing a requirement as 
to age for service by persons as directors of the Maryland Education 
Loan Corporation. 

Schools and Income Tax 

Chapter 17, House Bill 30, provides for major revision to the formulas for 
distributing State Aid to the public school system, imposing an addi- 
tional tax under the State Income Tax Laws to provide the additional 
monies for the payment of public school appropriations. 

Public Libraries 

Chapter 21, Senate Bill 44, establishes an incentive fund for certain public 
libraries to pay for debt service and/or capital outlay expenditures on 
a pay-as-you-go basis. 

Schools— Safety 

Chapter 24, Senate Bill 76, provides for the use of protective eye devices 
in vocational or industrial arts shops or laboratories by every pupil 
and teacher in public schools. 

Community Colleges 

Chapter 27,^ Senate Bill 132, creates a State debt of $15,000,000 for the con- 
struction of junior or community college buildings and facilities. 

Contracts — United States 

Chapter 29, Senate Bill 169, adds new section to Article 96, authorizing the 
political subdivisions of the State to enter into any agreements or con- 
tracts with the United States in constructing, financing, or maintain- 
ing any works of improvement. 

Employees Retirement System 

Chapter 33, Senate Bill 80, adds a new section to Article 73B, establishing 
a right of contribution and service credit in the State Employees' 
Retirement System for certain members who for temporary periods 
may have been engaged with an employer other than the State. 

Public Welfare 

Chapter 34, Senate Bill 81, amends Article 88A, adding one person repre- 
senting the State Department of Education to the Advisory Council 
on Child Welfare. 



♦All amendments revise Article 77, unless otherwise indicated. 



28 Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 

Capital Improvements 

Chapter 35, Senate Bill 119, waives provisions of Chapter 128, Acts of 1962, 
imposing a time for placing under contract the construction of an 
athletic field at Towson State Teachers College. 

Advisory Council for Higher Education 

Chapter 40, Senate Bill 197, abolishes the present Advisory Council for 
Higher Education and provides for the members of the new Council 
and for their terms of office, compensation, and duties. 

State Use of Motor Vehicles 

Chapter 52, Senate Bill 34, adds a new section to Article 15A, requiring 
Department of Budget and Procurement to promulgate and enforce 
rules to assure an economical and efficient use of motor vehicles in 
the various State agencies. 

State Employment 

Chapter 58, Senate Bill 102, amends Article 78A, providing for the creation 
of permanent jobs or positions of employment in addition to or in 
excess of those specifically provided for in the Budget. 

St. Mary's College 

Chapter 59, Senate Bill 205, changes the name of St. Mary's Seminary 
Junior College to St. Mary's College of Maryland. 

Scholarships 

Chapter 62, Senate Bill 69, makes the scholarships at The Johns Hopkins 
University applicable to any college or branch of the University. 

Teachers 

Chapter 69, Senate Bill 54, provides that persons employed in certain insti- 
tutions or other agencies with teaching duties and responsibilities com- 
parable to those in the public school system shall receive an annual 
salary not less than that of public school teachers of similar train- 
ing and experience. 

University of Maryland 

Chapter 71, Senate Bill 207, provides that at certain branches of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland the nonacademic employees be subject to the Merit 
System Law and all purchases for such branches be subject to the 
authority of the Central Purchasing Bureau. 

Teachers' Retirement System 

Chapter 118, House Bill 27, permits members of the Teachers' Retirement 
System to obtain service credit for service rendered by them prior to 
September 1, 1954, under an emergency teaching certificate, provided 
they pay required contributions into the System. 

Retirement Systems 

Chapter 119, House Bill 28, amends Articles 73B and 77, imposing the 
condition that a member of either the Teachers' Retirement System or 
the Employees' Retirement System may not retire within three years 
after the date of re-entry into either system after having withdrawn 
his accumulated contributions and then redeposited them. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



29 



University of Maryland 

Chapter 134, House Bill 171, amends Chapter 86 of the Acts of 1960, extend- 
ing the time within which the University of Maryland may contract 
to expend funds for expansion of its Baltimore campus. 

School Construction 

Chapter 139, House Bill 64, expands the school construction planning service 
of the State Department of Education. 

Veterans 

Chapter 148, House Bill 204, amends Article 96^, providing for an exten- 
sion of scholarship provisions to age twenty-seven for the children 
of certain veterans where the recipient has served in the military 
service during the period of normal scholarship eligibility. 

Teachers' Retirement System 

Chapter 170, House Bill 24, protects the right of a person to any benefit 
in the Teachers' Retirement System from garnishment or attachment. 

Teachers' Retirement System 

Chapter 171, House Bill 25, amends the law governing the Teachers' Re- 
tirement System to permit the designation by a member of his spouse 
as beneficiary without reference to the number of years of marriage. 

Employees' Retirement System 

Chapter 172, House Bill 26, amends Article 73B concerning creditable 
service under the provisions of the Employees' Retirement System 
in order to conform to the provisions of the Teachers' Retirement 
System. 

Employees' Retirement System 

Chapter 178, House Bill 275, amends Article 73B concerning certain officials 
entitled to a pension or retirement allowance under the provision 
of any law other than Article 73B. 

Administrative Procedure Act 

Chapter 188, House Bill 4, amends Article 41 to provide that the Secretary 
of State shall prepare and publish a compilation of all rules and 
regulations in effect on June 1, 1964, and adopted by State agencies, 
including the Department of Education. 

School Prayer 

Chapter 189, House Bill 80, provides for a daily period of silent meditation 
in the public schools; also provides that no student or teacher shall be 
prohibited from reading the holy scripture or praying. 

Special Session 
Howard County — School Board 

Chapter 8, House Bill 30, increases the number of members on the Howard 
County Board of Education from three to five. 



.10 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



NOTES FROM THE MINUTES OF THE STATE BOARD OF 
EDUCATION AND THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE STATE 
TEACHERS COLLEGES 

July 6, 1963 (Special Session) 

Under the broad powers authorized by Section 21 of Article 
77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, the State Board of Edu- 
cation met to review, consider, and take action on Resolution No. 
267-63 of the Montgomery County Board of Education. This 
resolution concerned fingerprinting- procedures for all employees 
of that local board of education and all applicants for positions. 

The Board was reviewing the resolution under its broad 
powers under Section 21 to supervise the policies of the school 
systems of the State of Maryland and not considering its legal 
sufficiency. Under Section 21 the Board has the right to review 
policies of county boards to determine in its judgment if the 
actions of the local boards are correct, not legally but as to dis- 
cretion or judgment. As to the resolution of the Montgomery 
Board, the State Board was proceeding on the basis that it was 
a valid and proper exercise of the County Board's legal power. 
The Attorney General had ruled that this exercise of power by 
a county board was not prohibited by any law. The petition of 
the Montgomery County Education Association attacked the le- 
gality of the resolution. (See Board Minutes of November 27, 
1963, regarding the equity suit brought by this Association con- 
cerning the legality of the resolution.) The consideration at this 
meeting was merely a review by the State Board of the judgment 
of the Montgomery Board in passing the resolution regarding 
fingerprinting. 

The State Board heard statements and questioned representa- 
tives of the Montgomery County Board of Education, the Mont- 
gomery County Education Association, and the Maryland State 
Teachers Association. 

The Board issued the following statement on the Montgomery 
County resolution : 

WHEREAS, according to Section 64 of Article 77 of the Anno- 
tated Code of Maryland (1957 Ed.), principals and assistant teachers 
shall be appointed by the County Board of Education on the written 
recommendation of the County Superintendent; and may be sus- 
pended or dismissed without appeal on the written recommendation 
of the County Superintendent for immorality, misconduct in office, 
insubordination, incompetency or wilful neglect of duty, provided 
that the charges be stated in writing and that the teacher be given 
an opportunity to be heard by the Board upon not less than ten days' 
notice; provided further, that in all cases when the Board is not 
unanimous in its decision to suspend or dismiss, the right of appeal 
shall lie to the State Superintendent of Schools; and 

WHEREAS, it is necessary for the County Superintendent to 
gather information of a private and confidential nature in order to 
make such recommendations; and 

WHEREAS, such private and confidential information in the 
Montgomery County school system includes a fingerprint card for 
each employee; and 



Maryland State Department of Education 



31 



WHEREAS, under existing procedures, the fingerprinting of em- 
ployees in the Montgomery County school system is done under the 
direct auspices and control of the Montgomery County Board of Edu- 
cation and the County Superintendent of Schools; and 

WHEREAS, under existing procedures such fingerprint records 
are maintained within the exclusive control of the local Board of 
Education and County Superintendent of Schools, after they have 
been processed by and through the Federal Bureau of Investigation; 
and 

WHEREAS, in the judgment of the State Board of Education 
the aforesaid mentioned procedures are deemed entirely adequate to 
accomplish the purpose of gathering the required information, and 
need no implementation, especially in view of the importance of keep- 
ing such records as private and confidential as possible; and 

WHEREAS, the Montgomery County Board of Education at a 
meeting on May 27, 1963, passed a resolution instructing the Depart- 
ment of Personnel, in addition to the existing procedures, to con- 
tact the Police Department of Montgomery County to make immediate 
arrangements to have the fingerprinting procedures for all employees 
of the Board of Education handled identically to the procedures used 
for the employees of Montgomery County, and that pursuant to this 
action of the Board there be sent immediately to the Police Depart- 
ment a complete and up-to-date roster of all employees of the Board 
of Education with the accompanying fingerprint cards on all em- 
ployees which are now on file, such card to be returned directly to the 
Personnel Department of the Board of Education; and 

WHEREAS, in light of the existing procedures established in 
Montgomery County, above cited, the new procedure established by the 
Montgomery County Board of Education in the aforementioned reso- 
lution in the judgment of the State Board of Education will unduly 
and unnecessarily impair the private and confidential nature of the 
information in the employees' personnel files; 

IT IS, THEREFORE, This second day of July, 1963, ORDERED 
by the State Board of Education, acting pursuant to the powers 
granted in Section 21 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Mary- 
land (1957 ed.) that no county boards of education or county super- 
intendents or any person under their supervision or control shall 
transfer any employee personnel records containing fingerprint cards 
or other information to any local or State law enforcement agency or 
any other State or local agency for processing, copying, or any other 
purpose; 

AND BE IT FURTHER ORDERED that the Montgomery County 
Board of Education rescind, revoke, and otherwise not proceed to 
implement its resolution, aforesaid, dated May 27, 1963. 

August 28, 1963 

The Board welcomed as a new member, Mr. William L. Huff 
of Washington County. Mr. Huff was appointed by the Governor 
to fill the unexpired term of Mr. C. William Hetzer who resigned 
effective July 1, 1963. 

Dr. Pullen reported that on July 25, 1963, the Board of Trus- 
tees of the State Colleges, appointed by Governor Tawes under 
the provisions of Chapter 41 of the Laws of Maryland of 1963, 
had held its first meeting. Mr. William L. Wilson was elected 
President and Mr. Samuel Hopkins of Baltimore, Vice President. 
The Board appointed Dr. Harold D. Reese as Acting Executive 
Director and Dr. Howard E. Bosley as Acting Assistant Director. 



32 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



At this meeting the new Board, by formal resolution, assumed 
all of the responsibilities conferred upon it under the law and, 
also by formal resolution, adopted as its temporary rules and 
regulations, the rules and regulations of the former Board of 
Trustees of the State Teachers Colleges, adopted by that Board 
on May 29, 1963. 

The State Superintendent reported that according to the law 
establishing the Board of Trustees of the State Colleges and the 
Advisory Council for Higher Education, the Advisory Council 
shall include three representatives of the State Board of Edu- 
cation, including the President of the Board, the State Superin- 
tendent of Schools, and a representative of a " junior community 
college." Dr. Harry Bard, President of the Baltimore Junior 
College, was appointed as the State Board's representative of 
the community colleges. 

The Board was advised of the accreditation of the Baltimore 
Junior College by the Commission on Institutions of Higher Ed- 
ucation of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secon- 
dary Schools, effective June, 1963. 

The State Superintendent called to the attention of the Board 
the following letter, approved by the Deputy Attorney General, 
to the school superintendents of the State regarding the decision 
of the Supreme Court respecting the saying of prayers and read- 
ing of the Bible as a part of the devotional exercises in the public 
schools : 

August 28, 1963 

To the School Superintendents: 

I had hoped to give you before now an opinion as to the effect of 
the decision of the Supreme Court respecting the saying of prayers 
and reading of the Bible in the public schools as a part of devotional 
exercises. It was my purpose to give you a list of specific prohibitions 
covered by the decision, but unfortunately the variety and number 
of devotional exercises are so great they cannot be easily and quickly 
categorized and their constitutional sufficiency or insufficiency deter- 
mined easily and quickly. Therefore, as a working basis to implement 
the decision, I am giving you a brief interpretation of the decision. 

In essence the decision simply says that no agency or agent of 
government may authorize, direct, or require the reading of the Bible 
or the saying of a prayer as a part of devotional exercises in the 
public schools. So far as I am able to learn, no local school system 
in Maryland or part thereof, with the exception of Baltimore City, 
has authorized, directed, or required the reading of the Bible or the 
saying of any prayer and, since the decision of the Supreme Court 
has been rendered, the school commissioners of Baltimore City have 
rescinded their official action. 

Any attempt to circumvent the decision of the Supreme Court by 
indirection or chicanery would be improper and not in the spirit of 
the administration of the public schools of Maryland. 

Sincerely yours, 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, JR. 
State Superintendent of Schools 

TGP:amr 



Maryland State Department of Education 



33 



Members of the Board were given copies of two reports: 

Guidelines for Preparation Programs of Teachers of Secondary 
School Science and Mathematics and Guidelines for Science and 
Mathematics in the Preparation Program of Elementary School 
Teachers. 

Mr. Paul E. Huffington explained that these reports were 
prepared as a part of a project initiated by State directors of 
teacher education and certification and developed cooperatively 
with the American Association for the Advancement of Science. 
Funded by a grant from the Carnegie Foundation the first study 
involved the preparation of secondary school teachers of mathe- 
matics and science and the second study, completed as of July, 
1963, dealt with the preparation of elementary teachers in the 
fields of mathematics and science. A number of conferences in- 
volving the State directors of teacher education and certifica- 
tion, members of the American Association for the Advancement 
of Science, and persons prominent in college and university pro- 
grams preceded the final issuance of each of the two bulletins. 

The State Superintendent reported on the status of the study 
of financing public education in Maryland. In June, 1963, Gov- 
ernor J. Millard Tawes had requested that such a study be under- 
taken by the Committee on Taxation and Fiscal Matters of the 
Legislative Council. Several members of the State Board and 
staff of the State Department of Education met with the 
(Hughes) Committee on July 31, 1963. At that time two prin- 
ciples were agreed upon — 

(1) that additional State aid is needed for public education 
and 

(2) that there should exist throughout the State an equal 
opportunity for education for all children. 

Members of the Board were given statements prepared at 
the request of the (Hughes) Committee of the inadequacies of 
the present program of State aid and the financial needs of edu- 
cation in Maryland. 

Action of the State Board of Education included : 
Adopted Bylaw 79, effective immediately, which provides 
that: 

The county superintendent of every county shall forward 
to the State Superintendent of Schools, within five days of the 
passage thereof, a copy of any rule, regulation, resolution, by- 
law, or other order passed by the respective county boards of 
education, as well as a copy of the minutes of any meeting at 
which any such action is taken. 

Adopted Bylaw 80, effective immediately, which provides 
that: 

The State Superintendent of Schools shall have the author- 
ity, either at the request of the President of the State Board of 



34 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



Education, or on his own motion, to order a stay, not to exceed 
sixty days in duration, of any action taken by any county board 
of education, whether the county board's action is taken by way 
of rule, regulation, resolution, bylaw, or other order; provided, 
however, that such stay be issued within five days of the date 
notice of such action is received by the State Board of Education 
from the county board ; and provided further that such stay may 
be dissolved at any time by the State Board of Education. 

Approved staff changes in the State Department of Educa- 
tion which included : 

J. Leo Delaney From Assistant Supervisor to Su- 
pervisor of Case Services — 
Vocational Rehabilitation, ef- 
fective July 31, 1963 

Harold B. Hayes From Counselor II to Assistant 

Supervisor in charge of case 
work- Vocational Rehabilita- 
tion, effective July 31, 1963 

Glenn W. Lewis Appointed Educational Supervisor 

of Agriculture, effective Au- 
gust 28, 1963. Mr. Lewis suc- 
ceeded Mr. Harry M. McDon- 
ald who retired September 1, 
1963 

From Assistant Supervisor to Su- 
pervisor of Mentally Handi- 
capped — Vocational Rehabili- 
tation, effective July 3, 1963 

Appointed Educational Supervisor 
of Public Libraries, effective 
August 28, 1963 

From Counselor II to Assistant 
Supervisor in Charge, Voca- 
tional Rehabilitation, South- 
ern Maryland District Office, 
effective July 3, 1963 

Adopted the following resolution on the retirement of Mr. 
Harry M. McDonald : 

Mr. Harry M. McDonald, Supervisor of Agriculture in the Divi- 
sion of Vocational Education, will retire from the State Department 
of Education on September 1, 1963, after forty years of service to 
public education in Maryland. Serving two years in the Navy and 
Marines during World War I and teaching two years at Newark, 
Delaware, before beginning his career in Maryland, Mr. McDonald 
taught agriculture at Frederick from 1923 to 1930 and was principal 
and agriculture teacher at Sparks in Baltimore County from 1930 
to 1946. He came to the State Department of Education as Supervisor 
of Agriculture in 1946. 



Merl D. Myers 

H. Thomas Walker 
W. Carroll Walsh.., 



Maryland State Department of Education 



:55 



Extremely active in agriculture education and widely known for 
his interest in and services with the Future Farmers of America and 
the New Farmers of America, Mr. McDonald is a past president of 
the National Vocational Agriculture Supervisors Association and of the 
Baltimore County Teachers Association. His service to public educa- 
tion in Maryland has been most significant, for he has exercised 
significant leadership in agriculture education at a time when this 
field has experienced troubled times. His influence will long be felt 
in Maryland agricultural circles. 

Mr. McDonald was born in Allegany County, Maryland, on Janu- 
ary 30, 1897. He was graduated from Barton High School and the 
University of Maryland. He received the degree of Master of Arts 
from Columbia University in 1923 and has done additional study at 
The Johns Hopkins University. 

The State Board of Education and the State Department of Edu- 
cation express to him their sincere appreciation for the invaluable 
contribution he has made to public education in Maryland and wish 
for him many pleasant years in the future. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1963-17E, effective September 1, 
1963, approving a supplement to the "Standards, Rules, and 
Regulations Governing the Provision of Special Programs for 
Handicapped Children of School Age Who Are Residents of 
Maryland/' which had been adopted by the Board on May 27, 
1959, to include standards for programs for children who are 
emotionally handicapped. 

Members of the Board were given copies of "Guidelines for 
the Establishment of Educational Programs for Emotionally 
Handicapped Children in Maryland, August, 1963. " 

Approved in principle the following report presented by Dr. 
Wesley N. Dorn on the. role of the State Department of Educa- 
tion in the promotion of experimentation and developmental 
programs to improve education in Maryland. 

Improvement of instruction depends to a large extent upon a 
planned program of experimentation, development, and evaluation. 
The State Department of Education has an important role in stimu- 
lating and supporting such experimentation and development. Great 
advances in technology and an increasing body of knowledge con- 
cerning the learning process now make it possible to choose among 
many ways of organizing classroom situations and utilizing newer 
media of instruction. Our goal of individualizing instruction and 
providing each student with the program which will best develop his 
potentials, utilizing the methods most appropriate for the individual, 
are only partially met by existing patterns of instruction. 

It is proposed that the State Department of Education serve as 
an initiator of educational development within the State by assisting 
the local school systems financially, as well as professionally, in util- 
izing existing research 'know-how' in actual classroom situations in 
the State. New practices may then be evaluated and encouragement 
be given to promoting the spread of those that prove effective. 

The concept of assisting the local school systems financially and 
professionally in the development of new practices is not new in 
Maryland. Maryland was a leader in the development of child study 
and the promotion of practices which took into account the results 
of this study. A State-wide program of child study started in 1945 
involved teachers, administrators, and supervisors from all twenty- 
four local systems. Financial assistance to local school systems for 
this program continues although to a much lesser degree than formerly. 



30 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



In 1950 a State-wide program in language arts, with particular em- 
phasis on the improvement of reading instruction, was started. This 
program involved all county systems and continued as a State-wide 
program for four years. Here, again, financial and professional aid 
necessary in carrying out this program was given to those systems 
requesting it. This program also continues at the present time where 
special emphasis needs to be given. Currently State-wide programs 
to improve instruction in mathematics, grades 1-12, are in progress. 

Neither is the concept of providing financial assistance to local 
school systems for experimentation and development new in other 
states. New York State appropriated $300,000 beginning in 1961-62 
and has increased this appropriation over the past two years for the 
promotion of experimentation and innovation in the schools. . . . 

Projects conducted at the local level with State support and lead- 
ership could explore such areas as team teaching, programmed instruc- 
tion, underachievement, dropouts, school-college relations, improved 
pupil record keeping for guidance and counseling purposes, studies 
on college admission and vocational placement. The specific projects 
would be determined on the basis of applications of local school sys- 
tems to the State Department of Education for review and approval. 
A review panel would be set up by the Department of Education for 
this purpose if such a program is approved. It should be noted that this 
proposed program would deal with experimentation and development 
rather than formal research. As such, this program would supple- 
ment research projects. 

The Department's 1964-65 budget request contains a request for 
funds for this purpose. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1963-19E approving an agreement 
between the Division of Vocational Education of the State De- 
partment of Education and the University of Maryland provid- 
ing for the financial support of teacher education at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. This plan provides for the preparation of 
teachers of agriculture and related services in vocational agri- 
cultural education programs in the public schools of Maryland. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1963-18E approving the 1965 State 
Department of Education budget requests for Headquarters, Vo- 
cational Rehabilitation, and Employment of the Handicapped in 
the amount of $4,480,564. 

September 11, 1963 (Special Meeting) 

At the request of the Montgomery County Board of Edu- 
cation the State Board met to reconsider the language and scope 
of its order of July 2, 1963, concerning the use of fingerprints 
in the personnel employment procedures of county boards of 
education. 

The Board issued a statement concerning the July 2 order 
which included : 

. . . After review of the entire matter, in consultation with the 
Assistant Attorney General, the State Board of Education has decided 
to let its order of July 2, 1963, stand without change. It is the opinion 
of the Board that the language of the order is clear. It was not the 
intent of the Board to prevent any county board from transmitting 
information received from the Federal Bureau of Investigation to local 
or State law enforcement agencies but to prohibit the transfer of 
personnel records containing fingerprint cards or other information. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



37 



The procedure for personnel checks in Montgomery County in force 
prior to May 27, 1963, is not intended to be disturbed in any way. 

In the light of the foregoing, the State Board of Education on this 
eleventh day of September, 1963, hereby reaffirms its order of July 2, 
1963. 

October 9, 1963 (Special Meeting) 

The State Board welcomed Dr. Edward N. Wilson, appointed 
by Governor J. Millard Tawes on October 1, 1963, to fill the va- 
cancy on the State Board of Education caused by the death of 
Dr. Dwight 0. W. Holmes. 

The Board heard arguments on the petition of the Mont- 
gomery County Council of Parent-Teacher Associations to the 
State Board of Education charging possible violations of Article 
77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland on the part of the County 
Council for Montgomery County and the Board of Education 
of Montgomery County. 

At the conclusion of presentations by all parties involved, 
the president of the State Board advised that the Board was not 
prepared to give any decision immediately but would take the 
matter under advisement and at the proper time announce its 
decision. He expressed his appreciation to all those present and 
stated that it is always encouraging to the Board to have people 
from throughout the State attend meetings because this evi- 
dences real interest in the children of the State. 

November 27, 1963 

Announcement was made by the Advisory Committee headed 
by Dr. David W. Zimmerman that the Sixth Maryland State 
Conference on Education would be held on January 30 and 31 
with the theme of the Conference to be "Current Forces Influ- 
encing American Education." Dr. Zimmerman stated that this 
conference is looked upon by people in the local political subdi- 
visions as an opportunity to participate in the formulation of 
educational policies. 

Mr. Mathias J. DeVito, Assistant Attorney General, reported 
that the equity suit brought by the Montgomery County Educa- 
tion Association, acting on behalf of two of its members and in 
conjunction with another teacher, with the State Board of 
Education as intervening plaintiff, challenging the right of the 
Montgomery County Board of Education to turn teachers' finger- 
print records over to the county police for screening, was heard 
in the Montgomery County Circuit Court on September 16, 1963. 
On October 2 Judge Ralph G. Shure rendered his decision in 
which he found that the State Board of Education had exceeded 
its authority in revoking the action of the local board of educa- 
tion and dissolved the injunction, ordering the fingerprint files 
to be transferred to the local police as requested by the Board. 
The Attorney General of Maryland immediately appealed Judge 
Shure's verdict to the Maryland Court of Appeals on behalf of 
the State Board of Education. By agreement of both parties, 



38 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



the fingerprint files were to remain in the care of the Superin- 
tendent of Schools of Montgomery County until disposition of 
the appeal. The case was docketed for hearing in April of 1964. 
The Maryland State Teachers' Association filed a petition to 
intervene as amicus curiae on behalf of the State Board of Edu- 
cation. (See Board Minutes of May 27, 1964, for ruling of Mary- 
land Court of Appeals.) 

The State Superintendent reported that it had been neces- 
sary for the Board of Trustees of the State Teachers' Retirement 
System to revise its action (taken in accordance with the request 
of the State Board of Education in February, 1963) adopting 
a policy that retirement deductions be made on all salary re- 
ceived from the boards of education. The Retirement Board, in 
accordance with an opinion of the Attorney General, ruled that 
retirement deductions made on salaries received for regular 
duties only are authorized. The Attorney General has interpreted 
the definition of "earnable compensation" to mean the full rate 
of compensation that would be payable to a teacher if he worked 
the full normal working time. Therefore, the earnable compen- 
sation of a member does not include such additional compensa- 
tion as bonuses, summer school salary, adult education salary, 
additional temporary payments made for research work, and 
honorariums for specific purposes. 

Miss Mae I. Graham, Supervisor of School Libraries, re- 
ported on the increasing role of school libraries in the educa- 
tional program, the results of the status study of school libraries 
in Maryland, trends, and the need for State standards. 

In the fall of 1962, the State Superintendent of Schools ap- 
pointed a committee to make a study of school libraries in the 
State. The purpose of the study was to determine the present 
status of school libraries as a basis for determining what stand- 
ards should be formulated for the development of the program. 
The study was done by a committee, with the assistance of the 
staff of the Division of Library Extension and the Division of 
Research and Development. Questionnaires were sent to every 
public school in the State and to each of the twenty-four school 
superintendents, and one hundred per cent returns were re- 
ceived. Washington, New Jersey, and Maryland are the only 
states which have made such a thorough study of their school 
libraries. All three studies are still in progress. 

The members of the Board were given copies of the sum- 
mary of the study as it relates to centralized libraries, size of 
book collection, personnel in school libraries, and services, staff, 
and financial support provided by the local units for school li- 
braries in the system. Centralized libraries are in 228 of the 
229 secondary schools in the State and in 80 per cent of the 
elementary schools. 

Seven of the twenty-four local units have school library 
supervision, which probably gives Maryland the highest per- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



39 



centage of local school library supervision in the nation. Four 
of these units provide central processing of all library materials 
for their schools. 

While per pupil expenditure for library materials has in- 
creased from 20 cents in 1946-47 to approximately $2.75 in 1962, 
the school libraries in the State still need at least three million 
additional books. The majority of the 186 elementary school li- 
brarians are employed in five systems. 

Dr. Pullen expressed pride in the work that has been done 
in the development of school libraries in Maryland, which has 
one of the best school library systems in the country, and con- 
gratulated Miss Graham on her accomplishments in this field. 

Action of the State Board of Education included : 

Adopted the following resolution on the death of Dr. Dwight 
0. W. Holmes, member of the State Board of Education since 
1951. 

The members of the State Board of Education acknowledge with 
deep regret the death on September 7, 1963, of their colleague, Dr. 
Dwight Oliver Wendell Holmes, a member of the Board since 1951. 

Dr. Holmes was born November 15, 1877. The son of a minister, 
he spent his boyhood in parsonages in West Virginia, Virginia, Mary- 
land, and the District of Columbia. He attended public schools in 
these places and earned his Bachelor of Arts degree at Howard 
Academy and College and his Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees at Columbia University. 

His professional career included fifteen years of teaching at 
Douglass High School in Baltimore and eighteen years at Howard 
University where he served as registrar, professor of education, dean 
of the School of Education and of the Graduate School. In 1937 
he became president of Morgan State College, a small Methodist 
college which under his leadership expanded into a large and effective 
State liberal arts college. 

Dr. Holmes, who was the first Negro member of the State Board 
of Education, was appointed to the Board in 1951 by Governor Theo- 
dore R. McKeldin and was reappointed for a second seven-year term 
by Governor McKeldin in 1958. 

Dr. Holmes was admired and respected by all with whom he came 
in contact. Long a courageous and intelligent pioneer for equality for 
his race, he maintained his equilibrium, disposition, and integrity 
in all situations. His interests in life were broad, and his many com- 
munity and educational activities give evidence of this fact. His 
influence was widespread and his counsel was sought by many. 

Dr. Holmes' colleagues on the State Board of Education will miss 
his wisdom, his thoughtfulness, and his dedication to principle and 
duty and regret that his warm personality and pleasant disposition 
will no longer grace their meetings. 

The Board wishes to express its deepest sympathy to the family 
of Dr. Dwight Oliver Wendell Holmes and to express publicly its 
appreciation and gratitude for the many services he rendered to edu- 
cation in Maryland and most especially for his valuable services as a 
member for twelve years of the State Board of Education. 

Approved staff changes in the State Department of Educa- 
tion which included : 

Edward G. Frack Appointed Educational Supervisor 

of Apprenticeship, effective 
September 25, 1963 



40 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



Announced that Dr. John L. Carnochan, Jr., formerly State 
Supervisor of Teacher Recruitment, resigned effective Septem- 
ber 30, 1963, to become Assistant Superintendent of Schools in 
Frederick County. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1963-22E approving the establish- 
ment of a comprehensive rehabilitation center in Maryland, in 
which the following services will be available : Medical and psy- 
chological and vocational evaluation, physical restoration, voca- 
tional training, counseling and guidance, adjustment training, 
maintenance for the severely disabled, and infirmary care, and 
authorizing the State Superintendent of Schools to request the 
State Planning Department to include a planning grant of 
$20,000 for this purpose in the capital improvements budget. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1963-24E revising Maryland Stand- 
ards for Nonpublic Elementary Schools. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1963-27E directing the State Su- 
perintendent of Schools to seek legislation to authorize an addi- 
tional community college construction grant in the amount of 
$15,000,000. 

The Maryland General Assembly in 1961 and 1962 enacted 
legislation providing grants to Maryland subdivisions on a 
matching basis for community college construction. The total 
amount authorized has been allocated to the various subdivisions 
for community college projects already under way, and a survey 
of additional requirements indicates possible further need of 
State aid in the amount of nearly $20,000,000. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1963-28E directing the State Su- 
perintendent of Schools to take whatever action is necessary to 
make it possible to mark as lawfully absent those children who 
are not in attendance because of observance of religious holi- 
days. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1963-25E approving the aid-to- 
education budget requests in the amount of $121,826,298 and 
the State-aided educational institutions budget requests in the 
amount of $1,540,245, making a total State Department of Edu- 
cation budget of $127,867,877 for 1964-65, exclusive of the 
Maryland State Teachers' Retirement System unit. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1963-29E approving the program 
of the Legislative Council Committee on Taxation and Fiscal 
Matters to revise the formula for distributing State aid to the 
Maryland public school systems. The proposal contains these 
basic provisions: 

1. Establishment of a guaranteed foundation program on the 
basis of an expenditure of $340 per pupil 

2. Provision for a required minimum salary scale of $4,800-$7,000 

3. Provision for a staffing allowance on a system-wide basis of 
46 professionals for the first 5,000 pupils and 45 professionals 
for each additional 1,000 pupils 

4. Provision for expenditures for other costs of instruction of 
$60 per pupil with an additional $30 for each new pupil 



Maryland State Department of Education 



41 



5. The allowance of the full cost of approved transportation as 
a guaranteed basic aid calculated outside the equalization 
formula 

6. Provision for an incentive for staffing beyond the ratio de- 
scribed in item 3, whereby the State pays the same percentage 
of $6,200 for each such person employed as it shares in the 
cost of the foundation program for each subdivision. 

7. A required local contribution toward the cost of the founda- 
tion program of 1.228 per cent of the sum of assessed valua- 
tion of real property equalized to a range of 50-58 per cent 
plus net taxable ordinary income 

8. Provision for a guaranteed minimum State aid of $98 per pupil 

9. Adjustment of the present program of State aid for school 
construction to the same basis applied to the current expense 
program 

February 26, 1964 

Miss Nettie Taylor, Director of the Division of Library 
Extension, reported that the Library Services Act, amended and 
renamed the Library Services and Construction Act, passed the 
U.S. Congress in January, 1964. The amended bill provides funds 
on a matching basis for the improvement of inadequate public 
library services in all areas regardless of population. The pre- 
vious law provided funds for improvement of services to rural 
areas only. The new legislation provides also for the first time 
funds on a matching basis for the construction of public library 
buildings. Maryland's allotment for library services will in- 
crease from approximately $122,000 to $436,000 annually, and 
the maximum available for construction of buildings will be 
approximately $349,000. Members of the Board were given 
copies of the Library Services and Construction Act (Public 
Law 88-269) and a summary of major provisions of the Act. 

In anticipation of the enactment of this legislation Miss 
Taylor pointed out that in January the State Superintendent 
had appointed a small committee of public librarians to advise 
the staff of the State Department of Education on the revision 
of the present State plan for the use of Library Services funds 
in the light of the needs of the libraries of the State and the 
expanded program. 

Miss Taylor also reported that the staff of the State Depart- 
ment of Education and many librarians throughout the State 
have expressed interest in the development of a State-wide plan 
for the extension of libraries in Maryland. Such a plan would 
take into consideration not only the needs and potentials of each 
type library but would capitalize on the strengths of each type 
in relation to others and would indicate specific areas in which 
cooperation would be mutually advantageous. The ultimate goal 
of the plan would be to provide improved library services to citi- 
zens and students in the State. For such an undertaking a num- 
ber of committees would be necessary, but a steering committee 
to plan and direct the study would be the first requisite. There- 
fore, the State Superintendent of Schools in late January ap- 



42 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



pointed a Steering Committee, composed of public library ad- 
ministrators, supervisors of library service in local school 
systems, a local superintendent of schools, and members of the 
staff of the State Department of Education, to undertake this 
work. 

Dr. Wesley N. Dorn, Director of the Division of Research 
and Development, reported that the Division of Research and 
Development is assisting local school systems in preparing re- 
search projects which may be supported from Federal funds. 
The Cooperative Research Program of the U. S. Department of 
Health, Education, and Welfare authorizes the Commissioner 
of Education to "enter into contracts or jointly finance coopera- 
tive arrangements with universities, colleges, and State educa- 
tional agencies for the conduct of research, surveys, and demon- 
strations, in the field of education. " 

A research proposal has been originated by the Baltimore 
City public schools to investigate the relationship between class 
size and pupil learning. Research on class size is urgently needed, 
and this proposed project should provide important information 
on this subject. This proposal has been signed by the State Su- 
perintendent of Schools and transmitted to The Cooperative 
Research Branch of the U. S. Office of Education, in accordance 
with the provisions of Public Law 531. 

The Division of Research and Development in cooperation 
with the Division of Instruction is working with representatives 
from the Baltimore City public schools, the Howard County 
public schools, and the Anne Arundel County public schools to 
experiment with a new student cumulative record form that is 
obtained through the use of automatic data processing equip- 
ment. The proposed form was developed at the Educational 
Testing Service with the use of Ford Foundation funds. In ad- 
dition to providing a history of the student's activities and sub- 
jects taken, it provides various averages and rankings which 
are valuable in evaluating the student's record but which require 
a considerable amount of clerical time at present to compute. It 
is important that a common language be developed in communi- 
cating student information to colleges and prospective employers. 
It is also important that the data be adapted to the school situa- 
tion in Maryland. 

A meeting was held on January 10, 1964, with representa- 
tives from the University of Maryland, Goucher College, The 
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore City schools, Howard 
County schools, Anne Arundel County schools, and Washington 
County schools, as a result of which four schools in the State 
will experiment with the use of this new form and the colleges 
in the State will be asked to accept the new form as the student 
transcript from those schools. 

It is planned that there will be subsequent meetings of 
representative colleges and the school systems of the State to 



Maryland State Department of Education 



43 



refine the ways in which more useful student information may be 
obtained with less clerical work on the part of the school. The 
colleges are expected to consider ways in which they in turn 
may feed back information to the schools as a means of helping 
the schools improve their programs. 

Dr. Dorn reported that at the May 29, 1963, meeting of the 
State Board of Education, the Committee on Educational Pro- 
grams for the Emotionally Handicapped had made a report con- 
taining recommendations to the Board for implementing pro- 
grams for emotionally handicapped children in the State of 
Maryland. The Committee indicated that a research project w r as 
to be carried out through the Division of Research and Develop- 
ment for the purpose of determining the most appropriate pro- 
grams of action. 

The Division of Research and Development in cooperation 
with the Division of Instruction explored the feasibility of a re- 
search project in the Maryland schools through consultations 
with local superintendents of schools and a number of consultants 
in the field of research design and special education. As a result 
of these conferences, arrangements have been made with Dr. 
David S. Jenkins, Superintendent of Schools of Anne Arundel 
County, to conduct a research project in the identification of and 
programming for emotionally handicapped elementary school 
children. 

Since there is insufficient information available from pre- 
vious research, this research project is essential to provide guide- 
lines for appropriate action in this area. A proposal has been 
prepared for submission to the Federal government, requesting 
research funds for this project. Approximately $150,000 will 
be requested for additional personnel, such as a coordinator and 
investigator and other research staff, the materials, and other 
resources necessary to carry out the project over a two-year 
period. 

In order for the staff of the State Department of Education 
to maintain leadership in the project, the State Board approved 
an arrangement whereby Mrs. Rozelle J. Miller, Supervisor of 
Special Education, would be assigned one-half time to the project 
with the understanding that her time on the project will be paid 
for from Federal funds. 

Members of the Board were given copies of an ' 'Interim 
Report to the Maryland State Board of Education acting as the 
State Educational Television Agency for a State-wide Educa- 
tional Television Service," January, 1964, prepared by the en- 
gineering firm of Jansky & Bailey, Washington, D.C. Pursuant 
to the agreement, dated November 1, 1963, between the State 
Board and Jansky & Bailey, engineering studies and design for 
a State-wide educational television system to serve the educa- 
tional and cultural needs of Maryland have been undertaken, 
and a final report will be submitted to the State Board later in 



44 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



1964. This interim report contains specific details for a first 
phase of implementation involving a Baltimore UHF station 
and initial design concepts and cost estimates for basic State- 
wide educational television service. 

A basic service for the State of Maryland involves four funda- 
mental parts. The first part involves statewide broadcast television 
service to all citizens in their homes. A group of seven UHF tele- 
vision stations located strategically throughout the state (Baltimore, 
Frederick, Hagerstown, Cumberland, Waldorf, Salisbury, Rockville) 
will provide effective service to essentially the entire state as a 
public service. The initial station will be located in the vicinity 
of Baltimore since a station in this location will immediately pro- 
vide coverage to the maximum number of Maryland residents and 
provides a strategic location for expansion of the system to other 
areas of the state. This system of UHF stations will be open-circuit 
type broadcasting thus permitting all institutions and the public at 
large to receive this service with conventional UHF receivers. 

The second part of the service involves multiple channel, closed- 
circuit instructional television exchange among such facilities as 
school systems, state institutions, and other agencies having educa- 
tional needs. This service involves multiple channel television recep- 
tion and distribution within buildings and institutions. Since programs 
provided in this service are not broadcast through the atmosphere, 
there are no regulatory restrictions on the technical methods which 
may be utilized to provide them. This means that special techniques 
and different television system standards may be utilized to meet 
the different needs expected at different user facilities. Implementa- 
tion of a state-wide interconnection network is planned in order 
to provide this closed-circuit service, in addition to the broadcast 
interconnection service, on at least a one-channel basis to all state 
areas. Activation of multiple channel distribution services is possible 
as the need develops in the school systems, state institutions, and 
agencies located throughout the state. 

The third part of the system involves suitable studio production 
facilities to produce high quality, professional caliber programs which 
the television system will utilize. These production centers would be 
expected to produce programs for the open-circuit broadcast facilities 
and to augment the closed-circuit instructional services. Additional 
equipment and facilities may be required to produce special programs 
and material from locations outside of the regular production centers. 

The fourth part of the basic state-wide plan involves the inter- 
connection facilities required to provide the program distribution 
from its origination and production facilities to the open-circuit 
broadcast transmitters and to the closed-circuit distribution facilities. 

All of the above four parts of a basic educational television 
system will be discussed in detail in the final report. Other techniques 
of ETV service have been carefully considered . . . The open-circuit 
broadcast coverage augmented by closed-circuit coverage is considered 
in this report to be best suited to the needs of the State of Maryland. 
Other techniques were found to be significantly inadequate in one 
or more respects and are therefore not recommended. 

The Board also received copies of "The Development of Edu- 
cational Television in Maryland, Second Report and Recommen- 
dations to the Maryland State Board of Education Acting as the 
State Educational Television Agency by the Educational Tele- 
vision Advisory Committee." This report contained certain rec- 
ommendations which may be considered in two categories, a 



Maryland State Department of Education 



45 



recommendation for implementing the construction, financing, 
and coordination of a State-wide educational television service 
and a recommendation for submitting petitions to the Federal 
Communications Commission to allocate television channls in 
Maryland for educational purposes. 

Dr. Dorn, in presenting the Advisory Committee Report, 
pointed out that the State Educational Television Agency has 
the responsibility not merely for the development of a State edu- 
cational television network but for informing the Federal Com- 
munications Commission as to the total cultural and educational 
needs that might be served by educational television in Mary- 
land. Accordingly, he suggested that the Board petition the 
Federal Communications Commission to reserve for educational 
purposes the UHF television channels which have been recom- 
mended by the National Association of Educational Broadcast- 
ers. Dr. Dorn pointed out that these channels are limited natural 
resources and that, unless action is taken to reserve a sufficient 
number of them for educational purposes, they may be forever 
lost for that purpose. 

Action of the State Board of Education included: 
Agreed to co-sponsor with the Maryland Library Associa- 
tion a State-wide conference on libraries. The proposal for the 
conference was presented by Mr. Edward Castagna, Director 
of Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, representing the Mary- 
land Library Association. He stated that a number of states 
have held conferences on libraries which have led to more public 
attention to library needs and improvement in library services 
and that this seems to be an especially good time for a Maryland 
conference on libraries. With new Federal programs of aid to 
libraries, increased State aid, the prospect of a new library 
school, and the urgent need to bring improved library service to 
more of the population, especially students and the underpriv- 
ileged, many opportunities and challenges face Maryland li- 
braries. The objective for such a conference would be to bring 
citizens together to inform them about libraries of all types in 
the State and to interest them in further library development. 
The conference should consider a predesigned, long-range plan 
to include libraries of all kinds within Maryland. The plan for 
long-range development for libraries in Maryland, with indica- 
tion of where the State stands in relation to library standards, 
would tie in with the American Library Association plan to 
present a national inventory of library needs. 

Approved staff changes in the State Department of Educa- 
tion which included : 

Mrs. Anne K. Carroll From Assistant Supervisor to Su- 
pervisor of Financial and 
Teacher Statistics, effective 
January 22, 1964 



46 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



Robert M. Bassford From Systems Analyst to Data 

Processing Systems Analyst 
III, effective February 12, 
1964 

Adopted Resolution No. 1964-2E approving the conferring 
of the following degrees : 

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science with majors in 
the various subject-matter fields, retroactive to February 28, 
1962, at Frostburg, Salisbury, and Towson State colleges (for- 
merly State Teacher colleges) . 

Master of Education degree, retroactive to February 26, 
1958, at Frostburg and Towson State colleges. 

Master of Education degree, retroactive to February 28, 
1962, at Salisbury State College. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1964-3E approving the Revised 
Maryland State Plan for the Strengthening of Instruction in 
Science, Mathematics, and Modern Foreign Languages under 
Sections 301-304 of Title III, P.L. 85-864 (National Defense 
Education Act of 1958), as amended, effective January 13, 1964. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1964-4E approving the following 
policy : 

1. The local boards of education are required to maintain on a 
permanent basis at least one complete and currently updated 
set of "as built" drawings, together with necessary support- 
ing specifications, for each building constructed by said local 
boards of education. 

2. The State Department of Education will retain those drawings 
submitted for approval by the State Superintendent of Schools 
until the building has been completed and occupied, at which 
time these drawings will be returned or destroyed according 
to the wishes of the local board of education. 

3. The State Department of Education may retain such drawings 
as it feels will be useful to it in carrying out its assigned 
functions. 

Requested the State Superintendent to invite the members 
of the Interracial Commission to meet informally with the State 
Board on April 3, 1964. This action was taken following a re- 
quest from the Commission to meet with the State Board of 
Education concerning the status of desegregation in the public 
schools of Maryland. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1964-6E approving the recommen- 
dations of the State Educational Television Advisory Commit- 
tee that a Petition and comments be filed with the Federal Com- 
munications Commission requesting that a minimum of two 
channels for educational television be allocated in the Baltimore 
area and a minimum of six additional channels be provided for 
the remainder of the State at such locations as will most effec- 
tively serve the needs of all the citizens of the State. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1964-5E endorsing the proposal of 
the State Superintendent of Schools to the Governor under date 



Maryland State Department of Education 



47 



of February 7, 1964, to implement a State-wide educational tele- 
vision system by providing approximately $1,278,170 for capital 
outlay and $93,825 for operating costs during the fiscal year 
1964-65 for an initial educational television broadcasting facility 
in the Baltimore area. Endorses the recommendation of the State 
Educational Television Advisory Committee that the capital costs 
of providing open-circuit educational television broadcast and 
interconnection facilities be borne by the State, that matching 
Federal grants be requested where applicable, and that a min- 
imum of programming be financed by State funds : 

Approved the recommendation of the State Educational 
Television Advisory Committee that a local coordinating and 
advisory body be formed to represent the in-school and out-of- 
school interests in their broadcast coverage areas as proposed 
in the second report of the Committee. 

April 17, 1964 (Special Session) 

The State Board issued the following statement concerning 
the election of Dr. James A. Sensenbaugh as State Superinten- 
dent of Schools : 

The State Board of Education has elected Dr. James A. Sensen- 
baugh as State Superintendent of Schools for a term of four years 
beginning June 1, 1964, to succeed Dr. Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., who 
is retiring after having held the position for more than 22 years. 

Dr. Sensenbaugh is presently Superintendent of Schools in Fred- 
erick County and has held this position since 1956. Prior to assuming 
his present position, the new State Superintendent of Schools served 
as Assistant Superintendent of Schools in Baltimore County from 
1946 to 1956. 

Dr. Sensenbaugh served in the United States Navy from 1942 
to 1946 and received his doctor's, master's, and bachelor's degrees 
from Columbia University. 

Dr. Sensenbaugh is 54 years of age, married, and the father of 
one child — a daughter who is attending Middletown High School and 
is in the ninth grade. The new Superintendent is a native of Freder- 
ick County. 

During Dr. Sensenbaugh's term as County Superintendent he has 
effected the complete integration of the public schools of Frederick 
County, with the exception of one two-room school which will be 
closed this year and the students assigned to other public schools 
in the County. 

Under Dr. Sensenbaugh's administration several large school 
buildings have been erected, and currently the new Governor Johnson 
High School is being constructed near Frederick City. 

Dr. Sensenbaugh, throughout his career, has been active in cur- 
riculum work and has had wide experience not only in Baltimore 
and Frederick counties but in certain other school systems through- 
out the country. 

A committee of the State Board was appointed to prepare 
a suitable resolution, to be spread upon the minutes of the State 
Board of Education, recognizing the long and faithful service of 
Dr. Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., as State Superintendent of Schools. 



48 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



May 27, 1964 

In the annual election of officers of the State Board of Ed- 
ucation, Mr. Jerome Framptom, Jr., and Mr. William L. Wilson 
were re-elected president and vice-president, respectively. 

Mr. Framptom officially presented to the Board the new 
State Superintendent of Schools of Maryland as of June 1, 1964, 
Dr. James A. Sensenbaugh. 

In expressing his appreciation to the Board, Dr. Sensen- 
baugh stated that he felt somewhat inadequate for the position 
in terms of the outstanding leadership during the last two ad- 
ministrations. In his opinion, the leadership of Dr. Pullen and 
his predecessor, Dr. Albert S. Cook, accounts for much of the 
prestige the Maryland school system has throughout the nation 
and the world. He added that, with the help of the members of 
the Board and the fine people in the State, he hopes the school 
system may continue to move forward. 

The State Board of Education adopted the following reso- 
lution on the retirement of Dr. Thomas G. Pullen, Jr. who retired 
as of June 1, 1964, as State Superintendent of Schools : 

WHEREAS, DR. THOMAS GRANVILLE PULLEN, JR., has 
served as Superintendent of Schools of the State of Maryland for 
twenty-two years with devotion, efficiency, and distinction; and 

WHEREAS, Dr. Pullen's contributions to the program of public 
education in our State have not been limited to creative ideas, which 
he possesses in abundance, but have embraced dynamic, faithful, and 
consecrated leadership, and have placed Maryland's education system 
among the best in the Nation; and 

WHEREAS, Dr. Pullen is now retiring as State Superintendent of 
Schools after years of tireless effort in stimulating, leading, and par- 
ticipating in various programs which have enhanced the quality of 
services rendered by the State's education system to all the people 
of Maryland; 

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, That the State Board of Edu- 
cation express to Dr. Pullen its sincere thanks for his untiring labors 
in behalf of the cause of education in the State of Maryland and the 
public interest; and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That the Board extend its best 
wishes to Dr. and Mrs. Pullen for their continued happiness; and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That the Board release the fol- 
lowing statement on the occasion of Dr. Pullen's retirement: 

In the more than twenty-two years in which Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., 
has served as State Superintendent of Schools his name has indeed 
become synonymous with education in our State. There is not 
a facet of Maryland's educational system which does not bear 
his imprint. 

A stalwart advocate and vigorous fighter for the principles in 
which he believes, Dr. Pullen has been beloved to many and re- 
spected by all who have come into contact with him. His greatest 
strength by far he has derived from the loyal support he received 
from the dedicated men and women who worked under his super- 
vision, in the State Department of Education, in the county school 
systems, and until recently in the State teachers colleges. Dr. 
Pullen had earned the support and devotion of those teachers, 
school administrators, and other staff members by being their 



Maryland State Department of Education 



49 



champion over the years, by making their cause his cause, and 
by defending their rights and privileges against all attacks. 
This statement marks merely a way station, not the end of Dr. 
Pullen's career. We of the State Board of Education wish our 
friend Tom Pullen, a man young in spirit but wise in the world 
of public affairs, Godspeed as he continues in the honored and 
honorable profession of schoolmaster in a new and different set- 
ting. Though we shall miss his presence in the daily work of 
the State Department of Education, we know that our association 
with him has by no means ended and that in the years to come 
we shall still be able to call on him for advice and counsel. 
We are sure that his successor will not mind but will indeed agree 
with our sentiment when we say that to us, to the State's teachers, 
and to the general public Dr. Pullen will always remain Mary- 
land's "Mr. Education." 

The State Board was advised by Mr. Mathias J. DeVito, 
Assistant Attorney General, that the Maryland Court of Appeals 
in its decision in the Montgomery County fingerprinting case 
upheld the power of the State Board to reverse the Montgomery 
Board on the matter and further established the power of the 
State Board generally in the details of its administration of the 
public school system. 

Dr. Pullen stated that he was leaving the State superin- 
tendency somewhat content because of two very important things 
which have happened in education in 1964: (1) The State-aid 
bill passed by the General Assembly and (2) this reiteration 
of the authority of the State Board of Education. 

Mr. Robert C. Thompson, Assistant State Superintendent 
in Vocational Rehabilitation, reported that, as authorized by 
the State Board at its November, 1963, meeting, the State Su- 
perintendent had requested the State Planning Department to 
include a grant of $20,000 in the 1965 capital improvements 
budget for planning a comprehensive rehabilitation center in 
Maryland. Mr. James J. O'Donnell, Director, referred the mat- 
ter to Governor J. Millard Tawes for consideration in his sup- 
plemental budget. The Governor decided to ask a small com- 
mittee to make an intensive study of Maryland's needs in this 
particular area and report its findings to him prior to the next 
session of the General Assembly. Mr. Norman Hebden of the 
State Planning Department was designated as chairman of the 
committee, and Mr. Comer S. Coppie, Dr. Albin 0. Kuhn, Dr. 
James McCallum, and Mr. Robert C. Thompson were selected 
to work with him. The committee is meeting with agencies and 
individuals who have expressed interest in seeing a comprehen- 
sive vocational rehabilitation center established in Maryland. 

The State Superintendent reported that the Governor has 
designated the Board of Public Works as the official State agency 
charged with the responsibility to administer the program of 
Federal grants to institutions of higher learning, both public 
and private, for construction purposes under the Higher Edu- 
cation Facilities Act of 1963. On April 17, 1964, the Governor 
appointed an Advisory Council to the Board of Public Works 



50 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



to assist in formulating a State plan under which institutions 
of higher learning in Maryland will qualify for Federal grants. 
Mr. O'Donnell, Director of the State Planning Department, is 
chairman of this Advisory Council, and the State Superintendent 
of Schools is a member. 

Other action of the State Board of Education included : 

Adopted resolution No. 1964-10E recommending to the State 
Board of Public Works an additional allocation of funds to Mont- 
gomery County in the amount of $512,750 representing fifty 
per cent of the estimated cost of construction and equipment 
for the Technical-Semi-Professional Building at the Montgomery 
Junior College, Rockville Campus, and, accordingly, that the 
required resolution recommending this allocation from the Gen- 
eral Public Junior or Community College Construction Loan of 
1964, be forwarded in the usual manner to the State Board of 
Public Works. 

Dr. Pullen reviewed briefly some of the points already con- 
sidered in the whole matter of allocation of funds from the Pub- 
lic Junior or Community College Construction Loans of 1961 
and 1962 for the Montgomery Junior College. At a meeting with 
the Montgomery Board on June 5, 1963, he made it clear that 
he could not approve the appropriation of State funds to provide 
facilities to accommodate students now being appropriately edu- 
cated at the Takoma Park Campus. The Takoma Park Campus, 
while inadequate in some respects, has been approved by the 
State Department of Education both for its present operation 
and for further expansion, and it has the approval of the Middle 
States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. In view 
of the very great need for the expansion of community college 
facilities throughout the State, Dr. Pullen believed that it would 
not be proper to use State funds to assist in replacing an exist- 
ing building that has been so approved. He stated to the Board 
that he could approve without restriction on enrollment the funds 
for the development of the Rockville Campus only so long as this 
enrollment does not result from the replacement of the Takoma 
Park facilities at this time. In the years to come it is quite pos- 
sible that the two campuses could be merged, but at the moment 
that eventuality is too nebulous to justify the disposal of the 
Takoma Park property. 

The State Board was assured that the educational program 
under development at the Rockville Campus does not replace 
progress now offered at the Takoma Park campus. 

Resolutions passed by the Board related to the construction 
of community colleges were as follows : 

[Revised project description for 
Resolution No. 1964-11E<| Charles County Community 

[College 



Maryland State Department of Education 51 

Resolution No. U^fip^J^Z^ 

f Cancelled previous allocation 
Resolution No. 1964-13Ejfor Montgomery Junior College, 

[Takoma Park Campus 

[Revised Resolution No. 1963-26E 
Resolution No. 1964-14Ej concerning allocation for Prince 

[George's Community College 

fRecommended additional alloca- 
Resolution No. 1964-15E] tion for Prince George's 

[Community College 

Approved staff changes in the State Department of Educa- 
tion which included : 

J. Edward Andrews, Jr. ..Appointed Educational Supervisor 

of Teacher Recruitment, effec- 
tive June 1, 1964. 

Mr. Andrews replaced Dr. John Carnochan, Jr., who left 
the position to become Assistant Superintendent of Schools of 
Frederick County. 

Miss Stella Loeffler Appointed Educational Supervisor 

of Public Libraries, effective 
July 1, 1964. 

Adopted the following resolution on Dr. Paul D. Cooper who 
resigned his position as Assistant State Superintendent in Ad- 
ministration and Finance, effective July 1, 1964, to become Di- 
rector of the State Bureau of Fiscal Research : 

Dr. Paul David Cooper came to the State Department of Education 
in January, 1962, as Assistant State Superintendent in Administration, 
Finance, and Research. When a separate Division of Research and 
Development was established in the spring of 1962, his title was 
changed to Assistant State Superintendent in Administration and 
Finance. 

Dr. Cooper was born at Maryland Line, Baltimore County, Mary- 
land. He was graduated from Towson Normal School in 1931. He 
received a bachelor's degree in mathematics and history from Western 
Maryland College in 1939, a master's degree in school administration 
from the University of Maryland in 1943, and a doctor of education 
degree in school administration from George Washington University 
in 1954. 

Dr. Cooper began his career in education as a teacher at the 
Jacobsville Elementary School in Anne Arundel County in 1931. In 
1935 he was made principal of the Arnold Elementary School and in 



52 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



1941 of the Linthicum Heights Junior High School. In 1942 he moved 
to Prince George's County as principal of the Maryland Park High 
School. He served as Supervisor of School Construction in that County 
during 1946-47 and was Assistant Secretary to the Board of Education 
during 1947-48. He went to Worcester County as Superintendent of 
Schools in 1948 and remained in that position until he came to the 
State Department of Education. 

Throughout his service with the State Department of Education 
Dr. Cooper has demonstrated administrative ability and leadership, 
especially in the field of public school financing. The work which he 
has accomplished has contributed to the improvement of the over-all 
educational program in the State and earned him the personal and 
professional respect of his colleagues in the Department and in other 
State agencies. 

The State Board of Education wishes to express its appreciation 
for the many services which Dr. Cooper has rendered to the State 
Department of Education, the public school system, and the children 
of the State. The Board wishes particularly to commend him for his 
untiring efforts in connection with the revision of the formula for 
distributing State aid to the local political subdivisions. The Board 
views his departure on July 1, 1964, with deep regret. He leaves to 
take the position of Director of the State Bureau of Fiscal Research 
with the respect, best wishes, and congratulations of his colleagues. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1964-17E which repealed and re- 
enacted Bylaw 251:2 (part of former Bylaw 11) concerning rate 
of charges for pupils attending school in adjoining counties. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1964-18E approving staffing as rec- 
ommended in Bylaw 231:3 

The size of the school system will determine to some extent the 
degree of staff specialization, but every effort should be made to pro- 
vide adequate instructional and pupil personnel services to both ele- 
mentary and high schools. 

A. The following ratio of supervisory staff for instructional 
services to pupil enrollment is recommended: 

One general supervisor for each 1,000 pupils enrolled up to 2,000 
and one general or special supervisor for each additional 1,200 
pupils enrolled 

For most local school systems this ratio should provide an instruc- 
tional services staff with special competence at both elementary and 
secondary levels in such areas as curriculum development, subject 
content, and specialized services, e.g., reading, speech and hearing, 
the gifted, the handicapped. 

B. The following ratio of pupil personnel staff to pupils enrolled 
is recommended: 

One supervisor of pupil personnel for the first 2,500 pupils en- 
rolled and one pupil personnel worker (visiting teacher, school 
social worker, or school psychologist) for each additional 2,500 
pupils 

Adopted Resolution No. 1964-19E which repealed Bylaw 
312:3 (former Bylaw 74) and adopted Bylaw 313:1 concerning 
ratio of teachers to pupils. This action was taken following the 
passage of the new State aid law (House Bill 30, 1964 Regular 



Maryland State Department of Education 



53 



Session of General Assembly) which repealed and re-enacted 
Sections 92 and 208 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Mary- 
land. Sections 92 and 208 provide that the State Board of Edu- 
cation may establish rules and regulations fixing the ratio of 
elementary and high school teachers to pupils enrolled. 

Bylaw 313:1 Elementary and Secondary School Ratios 
313:1 Elementary and Secondary School Ratios 

The classroom teacher is the key member of the professional 
staff, and the degree of teacher time which is available to stu- 
dents for instructional purposes is a major index of educational 
quality. In recognition of the fact that the appropriateness of a 
specific ratio of pupils to each classroom teacher may vary in 
relation to such factors as subject requirements, pupil character- 
istics, and school size, no prescriptive and detailed ratio is set 
forth herein. In staffing schools with classroom teachers, however, 
school administrators should regard ratios ranging from one class- 
room teacher for each 28 pupils to one for each 25 pupils as the 
arrangement which will be approximated following assignment 
of all professional personnel in the local school system. Each 
elementary school should be staffed with or have available re- 
source personnel in order to provide a comprehensive program of 
instruction in all areas of the curriculum. 

The increasing need in the modern school for administrative and 
certain specialized services in addition to those provided by the class- 
room teacher makes additional staff highly desirable. School adminis- 
trators and others should develop guidelines and objectives with which 
to work as they consider the distribution of duties among their avail- 
able staff. The tables which follow suggest desirable, yet reasonable, 
goals to be achieved in the typical school for such nonteaching school 
personnel. Individual situations may justify variations from these 
ratios, but consideration should always be given to the total school 
operation including, particularly, effects upon class size. 



A. Elementary School Ratios 

Number of Other 



School 


Number in 


Specialized 


Number in 


Enrollment 


Administration 


Personnel 


Library 


Under 200 


* 


** 




200- 299 


1.0 


** 


0.5 


300- 399 


1.0 


1.0 


1.0 


400- 499 


1.5 


1.5 


1.0 


500- 599 


1.5 


1.5 


1.0 


600- 699 


1.5 


1.5 


1.0 


700- 799 


2.0 


2.0 


1.0 


800- 899 


2.0 


2.0 


1.5 


900- 999 


2.5 


2.5 


1.5 


1,000-1,099 


2.5 


3.0 


1.5 


1,100-1,199 


2.5 


3.0 


1.5 


1,200- 


3.0 


3.0 


2.0 



* Some released time 
** Have available services of specialized personnel on a part-time 
basis. These personnel may include child development consultants, 
guidance workers, reading specialists, and speech and/or hearing 
specialists. Staff figures are to be interpreted as equivalent full-time 
personnel. 



54 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



B. Secondary School Ratios 



School Number in 

Enrollment Administration 



Number in 
Guidance 



Number in 



Library 



Under 300 1.0 

300- 399 1.0 

400- 499 1.5 

500- 599 1.5 

600- 699 1.5 

700- 799 2.0 

800- 899 2.0 

900- 999 2.5 

1,000-1,099 2.5 

1,100-1,199 2.5 

1,200-1,299 3.0 

1,300-1,399 3.0 

1,400-1,499 3.0 

1,500-1,599 3.5 

1,600-1,699 3.5 

1,700-1,799 3.5 

1,800-1,899 4.0 

1,900-1,999 4.0 

2,000- 4.0 



0.5 
1.0 
1.0 
1.5 
1.5 
2.0 
2.0 
2.5 
2.5 
3.0 
3.0 
3.5 
3.5 
4.0 
4.0 
4.5 
4.5 
5.0 
5.0 



0.5 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
2.0 
2.0 
2.0 
2.0 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
2.5 
3.0 



Within the ratio allowed for" teaching personnel, provisions must 
be made for the special needs of children. On May 27, 1959, the State 
Board of Education adopted "Standards, Rules, and Regulations Gov- 
erning the Provision of Special Programs for Handicapped Children 
of School Age Who Are Residents of Maryland." The ratios contained 
in Bylaw 411:1 should apply. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1964-20E providing for the repeal 
and reenactment of Bylaw 443:1 and adoption of Bylaw 443:2 
revising the State Plan for the use of Library Services Act funds 
in accordance with the Library Services and Construction Act 
(Public Law 597 as amended and renamed by the 84th Congress) . 

The State plan provides for the further extension of public 
library services to areas without such services or inadequate 
services and for the construction of public libraries. 

The Maryland plan for services provides for the use of 
funds to build up book collections, develop cooperative projects 
and services, and strengthen the services provided by the State 
to the local libraries. The Maryland plan for construction pro- 
vides Federal funds on a matching basis for a percentage of the 
total cost of new construction or expansion of public library 
buildings. If the Federal appropriation bill is passed in its 
present form, Maryland's allotment for fiscal 1965 will be $436,- 
000 for library services and $519,000 for library construction. 

Adopted Resolution No. 1964-21E approving a revised form 
and general instructions for the physical examination of Mary- 
land school bus drivers. This action was the result of study by a 
committee consisting of local supervisors of transportation and 
representatives of the State Department of Health and State 
Department of Education. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



55 



Approved Resolution No. 1964-22E which adopted as Bylaw 
616:30 requirements for the issuance of certificates to adminis- 
trative and supervisory personnel. 

Approved Resolution No. 1964-23E which repealed and re- 
enacted Bylaw 621:1 (part of former Bylaw 14) and adopted a 
revised Teacher's Contract form. 

June 9, 1964 (Special Session) 

The Board adopted Resolution No. 1964-24 which provides 
for the repeal and re-enactment of Bylaw 322:1, State Plan for 
Vocational Education. 

It was pointed out that no complete revision of Maryland's 
State Plan for Vocational Education had been made since 1948. 
Action was needed at this time to implement the terms of the 
Vocational Education Act of 1963 (Public Law 88-210) enacted 
by the Congress. 

A committee had been appointed by Dr. Pullen, composed of 
State and local school people in the field of vocational education, 
to study this matter and assist in the preparation of a new State 
Plan. 

The State Plan is essentially a contract between the State 
Board of Education and the United States Office of Education, 
stipulating the procedures for the expenditure of Federal voca- 
tional funds in Maryland. It sets forth the basic administrative 
policies, the legal requirements for vocational education, and the 
qualifications for teachers and supervisors. The following major 
areas are covered : Administration and Supervision ; State Fiscal 
and Accounting Procedures ; Program of Instruction ; Vocational 
Guidance and Counseling Services; Program of Teacher Train- 
ing; Research, Demonstration, and Experimental Programs; 
Construction; Work Study; Vocational Education Program 
Fields (Agriculture, Distributive Education, Fisheries Occupa- 
tions, Health Occupations, Home Economics, Business and Office 
Occupations, Technical Education, Trades and Industry, Other 
Cooperative Programs) ; Interrelationships Among Program 
Fields. 

Other action of the State Board included : 

Adopted Resolution No. 1964-25 granting provisional approval 
to the Mount Providence Junior College to confer Associate in Arts 
degrees, subject to certain conditions. 

Appointed Melvin H. Garner as Educational Supervisor of 
Trades and Industry, effective July 15, 1964. 

After considering the correspondence and materials sub- 
mitted, the Board ordered that an appeal be dismissed without 
a hearing in the case of certain citizens of Emmitsburg who 
appealed the ruling of the Board of Education of Frederick 
County regarding the selection of the site for the proposed 
Thurmont-Emmitsburg high school. 



5G 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



Affirmed the decision of the Carroll County Board of Edu- 
cation after hearing an appeal on April 3, 1964, of the Mount 
Airy Citizens League from the decision of the Board of Education 
of Carroll County to consolidate the high schools in Mount Airy 
and Sykesville into one unit. 

After these two appeals it was agreed that the Board should 
formulate guidelines for determining whether or not to grant 
hearings requested. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



57 



division of instruction 
General Elementary School Supervision 

Curriculum Revision in the Local School Systems 
Curriculum revision continues to be a major task in many 
of the local school systems. Supervisory and consultative service 
was concentrated in the social studies and language arts this 
year, involving nine local systems in the former and six systems 
in the language arts. 

Much time was also spent in working with supervisors and 
teachers on the improvement of instruction, especially in the use 
of newer materials in the language arts, mathematics, and sci- 
ence. Funds available from the National Defense Education Act 
have encouraged the purchase of a variety of teaching and 
learning aids, chiefly at the present time in mathematics and 
science. Use of such materials, which are new to many teachers, 
can improve instruction immensely. However, there is need for 
considerable study, experimentation, practice, and evaluation of 
these materials to help teachers use them efficiently. 

Visits to Schools in Local School Systems 
Visits to schools in local school systems were centered 
around newer practices and innovations. Although the self- 
contained classroom is the most widely used type of organization 
at present, other practices such as team-teaching, multi-level, 
departmentalization, ungraded, and dual-progress types of or- 
ganization are being tried in some schools with enthusiasm on 
the part of teachers, children, and administrators. Some of these 
practices promise better use of time, continuous progress for 
pupils, use of specialized skills of teachers, and a richer program 
of instruction. Efforts are being made to base these newer prac- 
tices of organization upon sound principles relating to child 
growth and development and the learning process with especial 
consideration to arrangements that can be made in each school 
to promote best learning opportunities for all children. 

The Bulletin, Design for Planning the Program of the Elementary School 

The bulletin was completed for final editing, the approval 
of the State Board of Education, and publishing for distribution. 
The final chapter which was written this year was devoted to 
possible practices in the years ahead which would give richer 
programs for more children. Suggestions include the provision 
of educational experiences for children below the present school 
age, using new or different approaches in teaching culturally 
disadvantaged children, providing learning opportunities the 
year round rather than only during the traditional school year, 
making more use of community resources — cultural, physical, 
and social — and making more use of newer technological media 
of instruction — films, recordings, tape recorders, programed 
learning, and television. 



53 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



The bulletin, which will become a base for curriculum guides 
in many of the local school systems, has been a means for stimu- 
lating much study, discussion, and evaluation of the present 
program in the elementary school. Its completion ends another 
inservice program of the State Department of Education for 
supervisors and principals of elementary schools. 

State Conferences 

The annual Maryland Conference on Elementary Education 
for supervisors and principals of elementary schools had as its 
theme this year, "Looking Anew at the Needs of All Children." 
The general sessions had as speakers Dr. Leland B. Jacobs, Pro- 
fessor of Education, Teachers College, Columbia University, who 
discussed "New Perspectives for New Times," and Dr. E. Paul 
Torrance, Director, Bureau of Educational Research at the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, who stressed "The Creative Needs of 
Children." Dr. Daniel A. Prescott, Professor of Education, Insti- 
tute for Child Study at the University of Maryland, presented 
beliefs regarding the factors that influence the development of 
intelligence ; and Dr. Alice V. Keliher, Distinguished Professor at 
Jersey City State College, discussed the pressures on and expec- 
tancies demanded of children today. 

The State Superintendent closed the Conference at the 
luncheon meeting on the second day. Since he was retiring in a 
few weeks and this would be his last opportunity to speak to 
this large group of educators as State Superintendent of Schools, 
he discussed from his long and rich experience, "Prospects from 
Retrospect," a topic related to the theme of the meeting and also 
presenting a look to the future. 

This annual meeting serves a worthy purpose in that it 
brings together the leaders in education in the State, emphasizes 
timely problems, and stresses needed practices in the local school 
systems. 

Program for Foreign Visitors 

This year the State was the host to seven foreign educators 
for six weeks. These persons, leaders in elementary education 
in their own countries of Finland, Greece, British Honduras, 
Zanzibar, Northern Rhodesia, Philippines, and Laos, were enter- 
tained by fourteen different local school systems. The visitors 
took part in community events, became acquainted with places of 
interest in the State, and participated in the schools' programs. 
Arrangements for their visit were made by United States Office 
of Education and the Division of Instruction in the State Depart- 
ment of Education. 

General High School Supervision 

Activities in the area of general supervision of high schools 
during the 1963-64 school year were numerous and varied. Ref- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



59 



erence is made in the following paragraphs to those deemed most 
significant. 

In the curriculum, the focus of attention continued to be 
directed toward English and the social studies. Advisory com- 
mittees previously constituted in both fields were at work 
throughout the year with the emphasis shifting slightly this year 
from the former to the latter. In both, however, there was a 
continuation of work designed to provide a foundation for the 
projected development of State curriculum guides and for the 
possible implementation of such guides under the leadership of 
subject specialists. The addition of such professional personnel 
to the Department staff, a long sought objective, appears now to 
be near realization. 

During the course of the year, work was completed on the 
revision of State standards for high schools. This fourth edition 
of the standards resulted primarily from the efforts of a State- 
wide committee under the leadership of the State supervisor of 
high schools. It is to be noted, however, that the final version 
approved by the State Board of Education reflected the views of 
educational leaders throughout the State. 

In other matters relating to the organization and operation 
of high schools across the State, assistance in the form of con- 
sultant services was given to several local units. Topics included 
were programs for the highly able learner (in Allegany, Howard, 
and Washington counties), the role of the junior high school (in 
Anne Arundel) , and course of study development in English and 
social studies (Allegany). 

Programs of an inservice nature for high school adminis- 
trators were continued. A three-day regional workshop, the sec- 
ond of a series, was conducted in August for principals and super- 
visors in the three westernmost counties. In addition, the annual 
State Conference on Secondary Education directed the attention 
of secondary leaders from across the State to the educational 
needs of all youth in today's world. During the conference, the 
junior high school and the senior high program of business and 
distributive education were examined in some detail. Also to be 
mentioned under the heading of inservice education this year 
was an unusual opportunity afforded general supervisors, other 
selected Department staff members, and several local superin- 
tendents. Under an arrangement provided by the U. S. Office of 
Education a travelling seminar was completed which included a 
visit to Florida schools with program innovations and other 
unusual features. This was followed by reviews and discussions 
in California with similar groups from other sections of the 
nation. 

Continued emphasis was given to work with the Middle 
States Association in the area of high school accreditation. The 
evaluative procedures used in the accrediting process served 
three major functions: 



60 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



1. The professional growth that the evaluation provides for 
the school faculty during the preparatory stages for the 
Visiting Committee. 

2. The benefits derived from the Visiting Committee's 
three-day evaluation of the school's program. 

3. The benefits that accrue to the school and to the system 
as a result of the recommendations contained in the re- 
port of the chairman of the Visiting Committee following 
the evaluation. 

As of January 1, 1964, there were 106 public secondary schools 
in Maryland on the accredited list of the Middle States 
Association. 

General Adult Education 

The program of general adult education in the Maryland 
public schools during 1963-64 consisted of offerings in the local 
schools and meetings at both local and State levels. In addition, 
special consultant service was provided to local school systems 
in the area of parent education. 

Each local school system developed its own program of gen- 
eral adult education. Some of these programs are widespread 
and effective, but others are reaching very few people. This is 
due partly to the lack of local funds and partly to the lack of 
full-time local supervisors in the area of adult education. 

Seven school systems have been engaged in programs of 
parent education. During the past year the total number of 
parents involved in the program increased and more lay leaders 
were prepared. Also, efforts were made to evaluate the program. 
A summer workshop, offered by the University of Maryland, was 
very helpful in this regard. 

All the local supervisors were brought together in March 
to hear a discussion of Federal legislation affecting adult educa- 
tion and to discuss questions of concern throughout the State. 

The Civil Defense Adult Education Program 

The Civil Defense Adult Education Program completed its 
second full year of operation after a contract was made between 
the Maryland State Board of Education and the U. S. Office of 
Education on February 28, 1962. 

Civil Defense Adult Education is a joint Federal-State pro- 
gram. The Federal government finances the program and is re- 
sponsible for its over-all planning and direction. The Civil De- 
fense Adult Education Coordinator assumes the responsibility 
for conducting the program in the State. The Coordinator works 
with the local school officials, community organizations, com- 
munity leaders, and others to organize classes, to inform the 
community about the classes, and to encourage attendance. Also, 



Maryland State Department of Education 



61 



the Coordinator works with local school officials in recruiting 
and training teachers for these courses. 

The training of teachers continued throughout the State to 
qualify them as instructors in the program. Eight local school 
systems participated in training programs during the year and 
from these classes 63 teachers became certified and eligible to 
teach survival preparedness in the adult education program of 
the local school system. There are now 231 teachers available 
within the 24 local school systems. 

Through the efforts of the local adult education departments, 
28 classes were formed, 682 adults enrolled in the various classes, 
and 612 adults received completion certificates. Since the pro- 
gram began two years ago, 2,278 participants have completed 
the twelve-hour course. 

The State Coordinator of Civil Defense Adult Education ap- 
peared before many groups throughout the year for the purpose 
of promoting the program. He made presentations before the 
Homemakers Clubs in the following counties : Allegany, Anne 
Arundel, Baltimore, Charles, Dorchester, Frederick, Howard, and 
Washington. Also, the Coordinator taught the Shelter Manage- 
ment Course to State employees. Radiation demonstrations were 
presented to various science classes upon their request. Contacts 
were made with several local school systems to dicuss the possi- 
bility of including civil defense education as a part of the high 
school curriculum. 

Curriculum Development Activities 

A major emphasis in curriculum development during the 
year included the preparation and editing of the list of printed 
and audiovisual materials contained in the Curriculum Center. 

Preparation for publication of the 1963 Supplement to the 
1961 Catalog of the Annotated Audiovisual Materials was 
completed. 

A three-day Annual Audiovisual Preview for the evaluation 
of films, filmstrips, and recordings to be purchased for the State 
Curriculum Center was held. Representatives from the twenty- 
four educational units and the teacher education institutions in 
Maryland attended this Preview and assisted in the evaluation 
of the audiovisual materials. 

Dr. Ira J. Singer, Director of Curriculum Development, 
Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Buffalo, New York, 
was the consultant invited to evaluate the State Curriculum 
Center on June 3 and 4, 1964. Dr. Singer's findings were in the 
form of a "Report on the Current and Potential Development of 
Curriculum Centers for the State of Maryland.'' In his report he 
gave suggestions concerning the staff and services of a State 
Curriculum Center as well as Regional Instructional Materials 
Centers . 



62 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



The State Coordinating Curriculum Committee held meet- 
ings to evaluate instructional materials for the 1964 List I and 
List II and to discuss policies for their distribution. As a result, 
letters were sent out to State agencies concerning their mate- 
rials. The 1964 List I and List II were prepared, published, and 
distributed to the local school systems, teacher education insti- 
tutions, and the public libraries in Maryland. These materials 
were made available through the twenty-four boards of educa- 
tion to all supervisors and principals of the public elementary 
and secondary schools. These lists were also made available to 
the elementary private schools and the State training schools. 
Twenty-two State agencies and 31 non-State agencies in Mary- 
land produced instructional materials on List I and List II. These 
materials should be useful in implementing the curriculum pro- 
grams in the public schools. 

Emphasis was given to two or three special areas of cur- 
riculum activity. These included the planning and helping to 
direct the first State-sponsored Newspaper Workshop held in 
Baltimore City from August 19-23, 1963. Approximately 160 
teachers from the metropolitan area attended this week-long 
workshop. The metropolitan newspapers of Baltimore and the 
staffs of the county papers gave excellent support to the work- 
shop under the coordination of Mr. Ray Hamby, Executive Sec- 
retary of the Maryland-Delaware Press Association. 

Social studies received major emphasis through the activity 
of a State Committee appointed by the State Superintendent for 
the purpose of developing a point of view and guidelines for the 
social studies for grades 1 through 12. The Committee met 5 
times during the year with consultants from the fields of history, 
geography, sociology, and economics giving emphasis to the inter- 
disciplinary approach in the social studies curriculum. 

The Supervisor of Curriculum continued to work with the 
Baltimore Sunpapers to supply the twenty-three county boards 
of education with free monthly prints of the news film "Screen 
News Digest"; he also continued to work with the Baltimore 
News American which sponsors free monthly Current Affairs 
Filmstrips to the junior and senior high schools of Anne Arundel, 
Baltimore, Harford, and Howard counties and Baltimore City. 

During the year the Curriculum Center vacated the premises 
in the Enoch Pratt Library and the new State Curriculum Center 
was opened at 2100 Guilford Avenue, Baltimore. While this 
Center provides some additional space and facilities, the recom- 
mendations from Dr. Singer's report indicated that it is far 
from adequate if the true concept of an instructional services 
Center is to be achieved in the near future. 

The State Supervisors of Curriculum also continued their 
work as resource personnel to the local school systems in a num- 
ber of activities. Evaluation of elementary schools using the 
Boston Evaluative Criteria was undertaken in several counties. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



63 



Other activities in the area of curriculum development 
stressed the evaluation of elementary school programs in a num- 
ber of the counties. The Supervisor of Curriculum worked in 
Anne Arundel, Calvert, and Cecil counties in supporting these 
evaluations. The Supervisor of Curriculum was appointed to 
attend the Rutgers Institute on Alcohol Education for three 
weeks during the summer and has been made chairman of the 
committee to develop a policy statement and guidelines on alcohol 
education for use in the public schools. 

The Supervisor continues to work closely with the Southern 
Maryland Reading Council at its major annual conference on 
the improvement of reading instruction. 

He served as consultant to five local school systems in im- 
proving science and social studies curriculums at the elementary 
school level. 

Health and Physical Education 

School Health Programs 

The Maryland State School Health Council is an advisory 
group to the State Departments of Education and Health. The 
State Supervisor of Physical Education serves as a Co-chairman 
to this group. One meeting of the Council was held during the 
year. Probably the most important action taken was the organi- 
zation of a subcommittee to study the school health services cur- 
rently being provided in local school systems and to recommend 
additional services that are needed. 

The subcommittee of the Council, established in 1962-63 to 
study what can be done about the early identification of reading 
problems of children before they are enrolled in school, has held 
a number of meetings and will make its initial report to the 
Council in 1964-65. 

School Physical Education Programs 

Four regional clinics in gymnastics and track and field for 
girls in secondary schools were conducted by the Maryland Asso- 
ciation for Health, Physical Education, Recreation with the co- 
operation of the State Department of Education. These clinics 
created much interest and received excellent cooperation from 
physical education teachers in secondary schools. The teachers 
received superior instruction involving latest modern techniques 
for teaching the activities in their own programs. 

There has been a notable improvement in the number and 
quality of inservice programs conducted by local units. School 
units are relying more and more on consultant services from 
whatever source they can be obtained, in or out of State. The 
reluctance that some persons once had toward using school people 
from the other school systems as consultants is disappearing 
discernibly. 



64 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



Beginning in September, 1965, one Carnegie unit in physical 
education, or a one-unit combination of health and physical edu- 
cation will be required as one of the 18 units necessary for 
graduation from high school. 

Maryland Public Schools Athletic Association 

The State Supervisor is responsible for the effective admin- 
istration of the Maryland Public Schools Athletic Association. 
Activities included the sponsoring of district soccer tournaments, 
a football coaches clinic, and a cheerleaders clinic. Interschool 
sports events held at the State level included the Cross Country 
Meet, Basketball Tournament, and Track and Field Meet. Each 
year more schools are participating in these events as well as the 
interschool wrestling, indoor track and field, and gymnastics. 
Since the county public high schools have no swimming pools, 
swimming is a neglected area in the physical education program. 

Physical Fitness 

The State Supervisor continues to be the liaison person be- 
tween the State Department of Education and the Maryland 
Commission on Physical Fitness. Increasing emphasis is being 
given to the Physical Fitness Testing Project, including the ad- 
ministering of the youth physical fitness test. In cooperation 
with the Division of Research and Development, norms were 
established for this test for grades 5, 8, and 11. Sixty-five thou- 
sand pupils were tested. 

The President's Council on Physical Fitness requested a 
comprehensive report from all State departments of education 
regarding health and physical education programs. One item 
of interest reported was that Maryland has gained 336 physical 
education teachers since 1960. 

Demonstration Centers in physical fitness were planned for 
Frederick County at the New Market Elementary School. 

School Outdoor Education Programs 

School Outdoor Education Programs continue to grow in 
number and importance in the local school systems. During 1964, 
seven such systems have carried these programs with Carroll 
and Cecil counties being new this year. 

A three-day State Outdoor Education Workshop in Septem- 
ber, 1963, with Frederick County as the host, highlighted the 
year's activities in outdoor education. 

State and National Groups and Conferences 

The State Supervisor of Physical Education served as 
President of the Society of State Directors of Health, Physical 
Education, and Recreation, during the 1963-64 year. 

He served on the Metropolitan Y.M.C.A. Camps Committee, 
accepted an invitation to serve on the Baltimore County Health 



Maryland State Department of Education 



65 



and Welfare Council from 1964-67, and served as a member of 
the Governor's Maryland Committee on Firearms Safety. 

National Defense Education Act — Title III 

Modern Foreign Languages 

During the school year 1963-64 the State Supervisor of 
Foreign Languages, working under Title III of the National De- 
fense Education Act, continued administration of the equipment 
acquisition program and supervision in the area of modern for- 
eign languages. 

Assistance was provided to local school systems in the devel- 
opment of projects requesting language laboratory equipment 
and supplementary teaching aids. These projects were then 
evaluated and processed at the State level to insure effective 
use of Federal matching funds. 

Throughout the year supervisory and consultant services 
were available to local school systems. Continuous contact was 
maintained with them and visits provided opportunities for con- 
ferences, planning sessions, and participation in activities di- 
rected toward the improvement of modern foreign language 
education. 

State-local sponsored workshops and inservice programs 
helped teachers become more familiar with new content and 
methods in teaching modern foreign languages and with oppor- 
tunities for participation in NDEA Foreign Language Institutes. 
The State Supervisor participated in many meetings held by the 
local school systems. 

State services included a one-week workshop for regular ele- 
mentary teachers on teaching techniques for TV classroom fol- 
low-up, a two-week workshop to train specialists for TV follow- 
up, a two-week workshop for continuing the development of State 
audio-lingual curriculum materials in French and Spanish. 
French, Level V, Part II and Spanish, Part IV were published. 
In addition, there was a four-week production workshop which 
resulted in the publication of a bulletin on Techniques of Teach- 
ing Modern Foreign Languages in the Secondary School. 

The State Supervisor aided two counties in helping plan and 
in furnishing consultant help for a six-week and a four-and-one- 
half week curriculum workshop. 

Several conferences of all the foreign language supervisors 
in the State were held to share ideas and to plan specific ways in 
which the Maryland State Department of Education could best 
help local foreign language instruction. 

The State Supervisor of Foreign Languages has been ac- 
tively engaged in a number of national and regional programs 
concerned with improving modern foreign language education. 
These included the Modern Language Association, the Depart- 
ment of Foreign Languages of the National Education Associa- 
tion, and the U. S. Office of Education. 



66 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



Science and Mathematics 

The program and activities of the State Supervisor of High 
Schools, working in science, mathematics, and Title III of the 
National Defense Education Act, during the school year 1963-64 
can be described in five general areas as follows: Title III 
National Defense Education Act administrative activities; State 
and regional activities in science and mathematics; general ac- 
tivities in science and mathematics for all local school systems; 
special activities and programs in science and mathematics for 
local school systems; and work with other agencies in science 
and mathematics. 

Title III NDEA Administrative Activities 

A general management and control program was main- 
tained over the receipt and processing of projects for the acqui- 
sition of equipment and materials by local school systems. A 
total of 775 projects were processed in this program during the 
year. Two reallocations of Federal funds were managed, result- 
ing in an 85 per cent increase of funds in this program over and 
beyond the original allocation of the year. The Maryland State 
Plan for Title III was rewritten in accordance with amendments 
and changes in the Act. New project forms, guidelines, and 
standards were developed to implement the revised plan and 
procedures. Liaison was maintained with the U. S. Office of 
Education with special attention given to explanation and justifi- 
cation of audit questions and arrangements for the annual ad- 
ministrative review. Annual reports and those of projected 
activities were prepared and submitted. An annual review and 
analysis of NDEA projects was provided. 

State and Regional Activities in Science and Mathematics 

Two conferences at the State level were arranged for super- 
visory personnel with responsibilities in science and mathematics 
for elementary and secondary personnel. The supervisor also 
participated in State conferences of a more general nature. 
Activities on a regional basis, especially inservice programs, were 
developed during the year. Cooperative inservice sessions for 
secondary science teachers in Garrett and Allegany counties; a 
two-week regional workshop in elementary science for Wicomico, 
Worcester, and Somerset counties; a cooperative midwinter in- 
service program for Caroline, Talbot, and surrounding counties 
are illustrative of the programs of this type which were 
developed. 

General Activities in Science and Mathematics for All Local School Systems 
Visitations and local conferences with all local school systems 
were continuous activities throughout the year to assist in the 
evaluation of science, mathematics, and NDEA Title III pro- 
grams, and in the development of new programs. Inservice pro- 
grams, curriculum development, improved teaching procedures, 



Maryland State Department of Education 



07 



and planning for improved science facilities were the main con- 
cerns of such conferences and visits. 

Constant communication was maintained with local school 
systems through the "Maryland Science and Mathematics News- 
letter" initiated during the year, and through special mailings. 
The Newsletter served to bring about an exchange of ideas; to 
provide suggestions for new programs, curriculum developments, 
and teaching procedures; to interject the thinking of leaders in 
these areas ; and to indicate promising developments and activi- 
ties throughout the State. 

Special Activities for Local School Systems 

To develop pilot programs or encourage initiation of new 
programs or to further assist existing promising programs, spe- 
cial activities were developed with some local school systems. 
Participation in the St. Mary's County elementary science project, 
using the conceptual schemes approach, the Howard County ele- 
mentary science activities workshop, and provisions for a Caro- 
line County elementary mathematics workshop are typical of 
these activities. Personal assistance was given in many cases, 
and arrangements for outside consultants were made in others. 
Work with Other Agencies in Science and Mathematics 

Many agencies and groups throughout the State and nation 
have interests in science and mathematics education. The State 
Supervisor cooperated with these groups and provided guidelines 
and assistance for their relations with the schools. Some of the 
groups involved in these programs were : The Maryland Academy 
of Sciences with its programs of the Junior Science and Humani- 
ties Symposium, Sessions with Scientists, and scientist visita- 
tions ; the National Science Fair held in Baltimore in May, 1964 ; 
the University of Maryland Science Center; the Regional Coun- 
selor Program of the American Association of Physics Teachers ; 
the educational aids program of the Chesapeake and Potomac 
Telephone Company; and the programs of the National Aero- 
nautics and Space Administration. 

Pupil Personnel and Guidance Services 

Significant developments in Pupil Services during 1963-64 
include : 

1. Inservice program for professional personnel 

2. The appointment of a State-wide committee on pupil 
services 

3. Research projects in automatic data processing and in 
development of pupil services in elementary schools 

Major emphasis in pupil services was on inservice programs 
to help professional personnel increase their understanding and 
skill in the identification of pupil needs and in the provision of 
educational programs in terms of these needs. The State super- 
visors participated in local and regional conferences and work- 



68 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



shops for teachers, administrators, and pupil services personnel. 
The following inservice programs for personnel in pupil services 
were conducted by this Department : 

The annual conference of guidance and pupil personnel 
workers and regional conferences for counselors in two geo- 
graphic areas were scheduled during the year. In addition, a 
special conference of supervisors of psychological service and 
psychologists was held. Dr. Ralph H. Tindall, President, Division 
of School Psychologists, American Psychological Association and 
Professor of Psychology, University of South Carolina, spoke on 
"Developments and Trends in Psychological Services in School 
Systems.'' 

The rapidly expanding growth of psychologists in the pub- 
lic schools marks a new trend in providing specialized services 
to pupils. State-wide leadership in coordinating the work of the 
psychologists is assuming major importance. 

A State-wide Committee on Pupil Services was appointed by 
the State Superintendent with representatives from administra- 
tive and instructional areas as well as the different disciplines 
of pupil services. This committee was charged with appraising 
present programs in pupil services, studying implications of 
research findings for pupil services, and preparing a policy 
statement in this area. Regular meetings of this committee were 
held throughout the year. 

Two research projects of considerable interest were initiated 
by the Divisions of Instruction and Research and Development. 
These are: 

1. The Cooperative Plan for Guidance and Admission 
(CPGA). 

This project involves the preparation of standardized 
transcripts for college admission from the records of high 
school students in the eleventh grade by automatic data 
processing. Three local school systems (Anne Arundel 
County, Baltimore City, and Howard County) are par- 
ticipating in the study. 

2. The development of experimental situations in pupil 
personnel services is part of the research program of 
the Interprofessional Research Commission on Pupil 
Personnel Services (IRCOPPS). 

This project involves setting up different situations 
in pupil personnel services for the purpose of evaluating 
such services. Plans were made with two local school 
systems (Anne Arundel County and Calvert County) 
for the development of this project in selected elementary 
schools. 

The Supervisor of Special Education, whose major assign- 
ment is working with educational programs in other State agen- 
cies, also shared responsibility for Title V-A of the testing pro- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



09 



grams and worked closely with the Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 
in administering this program. He visited county units to discuss 
and review testing programs with supervisors, principals, and 
counselors. He assisted in sponsoring regional conferences which 
considered such topics as "Making More Effective Use of Test 
Results," "What's the Score," and "Improving Teacher-Made 
Tests." A portfolio of materials on testing under the title 
Teachers-Counselors- Administrators Put Test Results to Work 
for Instruction-Guidance- Administration was prepared and dis- 
tributed to conference participants. 

The complexity of our society continues to increase the 
need for pupil services to support the instructional program in 
our schools. Pressures on teachers and schools to produce and 
on pupils to achieve in the academic areas continue unabated. 
Other activities and influences impinge upon youth for their 
time, energy, and efforts. Many get confused and lost; hence, 
many become frustrated and leave schools as dropouts. Helping 
faculties and school officials understand the need for expanding 
services and extending educational opportunities has been a 
major focus of our efforts. 

Conferences and consultant services have been provided in 
areas such as Baltimore City, Anne Arundel, Prince George's, 
and other counties where greatest numbers of these disadvan- 
taged youth are found. Emphasis in these conferences has been 
upon early identification of students with problems and types 
of activities which faculty, school, and community may plan to 
help solve these problems. 

Special Education 

During this school year the supervisors of special education 
engaged in the following activities : 

Initiated and worked with the State Committee on Educa- 
tional Programs for Emotionally Handicapped Children 

Planned and directed a three-weeks workshop at Towson 
State College for teachers of the educable and trainable men- 
tally retarded 

Planned and conducted the annual State-wide inservice 
conference with speech and hearing teachers 

Visited special education classes in public and nonpublic 
schools in order to evaluate teaching procedures, facilities, and 
equipment 

Worked with State agencies and national and State groups 
including the supervision of education programs at Crownsville 
and Rosewood State Hospitals, worked with the directors of 
the Maryland School for the Blind, and the Maryland School 
for the Deaf; and participated in activities sponsored by the 
State Federation of the Council for Exceptional Children. 

A major activity during the year was concerned with the 
processing of applications for scholarships and fellowships under 



70 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



U. S. Public Law 88-164, providing financial assistance to teach- 
ers in special education programs. 

The usual activities included planning and conducting State- 
wide meetings for supervisors concerned with special education, 
acting as consultants to colleges and universities in planning 
special education programs, and in planning and conducting 
local workshops for teachers. 

Work with Other State Agencies and Institutions 

During the school year 1963-64, continued efforts were 
directed toward strengthening and redirecting instructional pro- 
grams of education at State juvenile and correctional institu- 
tions, toward promoting professional growth of educational 
personnel in these institutions, toward fostering effective work- 
ing relationships among public schools, State colleges, and 
institutional schools, toward advancing coordination in the total 
area of pupil services, toward furthering implementation of 
sections III and V of the National Defense Education Act, and 
toward working on tasks with various State agencies and com- 
mittees. 

The fourth annual preschool conference for the training 
school teachers of Maryland was held on August 30, 1963, at the 
State Roads Commission Building. Dr. Ethel J. Alpenfels, Pro- 
fessor of Anthropology, New York University, set the stage for 
the conference with her keynote address at the morning session 
on "The Culture of Delinquency." The afternoon session was 
devoted to group meetings with the topics of special education, 
industrial arts, and the basic academic subjects receiving special 
emphasis. Group discussions on each topic were stimulated by 
university, college, and public school consultants. 

Inservice professional meetings were conducted for educa- 
tional personnel teaching in State institutions. These meetings 
were concerned with curriculum development, ungraded classes, 
audiovisual media, teaching techniques, and the use of pro- 
grammed learning materials. Particular emphasis was centered 
on the teaching of reading. For instance, one session on reading 
was held at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Men on 
February 4 and another at the Maryland Training School for 
Boys on June 23. The programs included demonstration classes, 
question-answer periods, and a discussion of various approaches 
to reading. 

Through the cooperation of officials at the Maryland Train- 
ing School for Boys, Towson State College, and the Baltimore 
County Public Schools, arrangements were completed whereby 
the college would offer two courses on the teaching of reading 
on the training school campus during the month of July with 
Dr. Gilbert B. Schiffman serving as the instructor. Since the 
courses will be conducted in a training school setting and boys 
at the training school will be used during the laboratory sessions, 



Maryland State Department of Education 



71 



it is believed that training school teachers will find the learning 
experience most appropriate in upgrading their teaching skills. 

A pilot educational program, offered two nights per week, 
was initiated at the Meadow Mountain Boys Forestry Camp. It 
is hoped that programs can be started next year at the Green- 
ridge and Lonaconing Boys Forestry Camps. On request, the 
supervisor helped to organize adult education night classes at 
the five correctional camps operated by the Department of 
Correction. 

Special efforts were made to encourage administrators of 
the training schools to take advantage of the provisions of Title 
III of the National Defense Education Act to strengthen pro- 
grams in science and mathematics. 

The supervisor was called upon by the State Department 
of Welfare and the State Department of Correction for consul- 
tations relating to educational matters such as teacher certifica- 
tion and compensation, physical facilities, and program planning. 

The supervisor was also called to represent the Department 
at meetings convened by the State Commission on Aging and 
engaged in educational activities dealing with problems of the 
aging. 



7^ 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



division of library extension 
General 

The activities of the Division of Library Extension have 
been focused on the implementation of plans and projects re- 
sulting from recommendations of special consultants, study 
committees, and factual reports. 

In the fall of 1963 the Division sponsored a two-day insti- 
tute on "Building Book Collections in School and Public Li- 
braries." More than 100 public and school librarians attended. 
Principal speakers were : Dr. Margaret Monroe, Director, 
Library School, University of Wisconsin, and Dr. Ihab Hassan, 
Director, College of Letters, Wesleyan University. Extensive 
lists of twentieth century literature were prepared by committees 
and used as the basis for discussion and for future use in book 
selection. 

Dr. Lowell Martin, Vice President, Grolier Society, Inc. and 
former Dean of the School of Library Science at Rutgers Uni- 
versity, served as a consultant to the Division of Library Exten- 
sion's staff in evaluating the State library program. His report 
reviews the development of libraries in the State and points 
up the need for strengthening the individual public and school 
library collections and staffs and for increased coordinated serv- 
ices at both local and State levels. 

Plans are under way for a State Citizens Conference on 
Libraries to be cosponsored by the Maryland State Board of 
Education and the Maryland Library Association. 

In August, Mr. H. Thomas Walker joined the staff as Super- 
visor of Public Libraries with special responsibility for adult 
book collections and services and inservice training programs. 
In July, 1964, Miss Stella Loefner joined the staff as special 
consultant in planning library buildings. She will administer the 
program of State and Federal funds for public library buildings. 

Publications 

(1) The 1963 report Survey of School Libraries in Maryland 
was completed and publication is planned for the fall of 1964. 

(2) A Guide to Reference Materials in the Baltimore Metro- 
politan Area was prepared for the Department by Miss Mary 
Barton and published in 1963. It provides a subject list of the 
special collections in libraries of all types in the area. 

(3) In April, 1964, the Division began publication of the 
Library Newsletter. Designed to serve as a channel of com- 
munication on library activities, developments and opinions, the 
Newsletter will be issued three or four times a year. 

(4) Several timely book lists were purchased from the 
Enoch Pratt Free Library and issued in quantity to the public 
libraries for distribution to library users in their own commu- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



73 



nities. Included were: Politics 196J+, Brush Up on Your Shake- 
speare, Novels ivith a Flavor, and Let's Read (Juvenile lists for 
four age groups) . 

Public Libraries 

This year special emphasis was given to : legislative activi- 
ties, inservice training courses, trustee conferences, and increased 
cooperation among library systems. 

Legislation 

Maryland became the first State in the union to provide 
funds for public library building by enacting the Public Library 
Building Incentive fund law in 1964. The State will henceforth 
share with State aided local libraries the costs of acquiring land, 
construction, and debt service. State funds will pay the differ- 
ence between what one-half cent on the $100 assessed valuation 
will produce and twenty-five cents per capita to libraries which 
wish to participate in the program. 

The Federal Library Services and Construction Act, which 
added the construction title to and extended the existing Library 
Services Act, was passed by the Eighty-seventh Congress in 
1964. The Act extends provisions for improving inadequate pub- 
lic library service to metropolitan areas and adds $314,000 to 
the $122,000 previously available to Maryland for 1964-65. 

The construction title provides $514,000 for construction 
of public library buildings in the State. 

The State Board of Education approved the State Plan for 
the Library Services and Construction Act in May, 1964. The 
plan, which was developed by a committee of administrators of 
public libraries and the Division of Library Extension staff, 
emphasizes the establishment of cooperative library services in 
both rural and metropolitan areas and the strengthening of in- 
adequate book collections. The construction plan provides that 
libraries may apply for $70,000 or 30 per cent of the total cost 
of construction of a new or substantially enlarged public library 
building. 

Inservice Training 

The Division of Library Extension initiated an inservice 
training program for less-than-fully qualified librarians already 
employed in public libraries. This activity is the direct result 
of expressions of public library administrators and trustees for 
such training as an initial step in improving the quality of service 
to the users of the libraries. Two programs were completed — 
the first for the Eastern Shore libraries (Caroline, Dorchester, 
Kent, Queen Anne's, Talbot, Wicomico, and Worcester) — the 
second for the Southern Maryland counties (Anne Arundel, Cal- 
vert, Charles, Prince George's, and St. Mary's) . The normal 



74 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



length of the training period is twenty days, usually one day 
per week. The sessions are conducted by librarians skilled and 
knowledgeable in the fields of reference, informational materials, 
adult fiction, and children's literature. The training program 
is not a substitute for the full training of qualified librarians, 
rather a practical step in improving the library skills of current 
staff members. 

Public Library Trustees Conferences 

In cooperation with the Trustees' Section of the Maryland 
Library Association, four regional conferences for trustees were 
held during the year at Salisbury, Parkville, Hagerstown, and 
Annapolis. More than 100 trustees and library directors dis- 
cussed the relationship between library board and librarian in 
improving library services and in planning for library buildings. 

Mrs. John Daugherty, St. Mary's County Board of Library 
Trustees, was in charge of the programs. 

Cooperative Library Services 

The Processing Center located in the Wicomico County Li- 
brary in Salisbury is truly State-wide in its services. With three 
additional county systems now contracting for the services, 
seventeen of Maryland's county public libraries are having their 
books ordered and processed by the Center. In 1963-64 more 
than 53,000 books were processed. 

The library directors of the eight metropolitan public li- 
braries and the staff of the Division of Library Extension con- 
tinued to meet to explore ways to develop cooperative services 
and to plan for the use of LSCA funds to implement cooperative 
practices. 

Trends and Needs 

Public libraries are experiencing increasing use of their 
books and other resources, with increasing demands for more 
informational and reference services to meet student and adult 
demands. Book collections continue to grow slowly and to remain 
inadequate with more than half the libraries having only one- 
half the number of books needed. Lack of professional library 
personnel is also an acute problem in most libraries of the State. 
Cooperative projects are growing and should continue to expand 
in the provision of specialized materials and personnel but these 
projects cannot overcome the need for vastly increased staff and 
books in the individual libraries. 

School Libraries, 1963-64 

Local school systems continued to improve and expand their 
library programs during 1963-64. Harford County added a full- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



75 



time school library supervisor, and four others assigned to one 
of their general supervisors the responsibility for the school li- 
brary program in the county. One-third of the school systems 
in the State now have full-time supervisory services for school 
libraries. In efforts to provide more professional library services 
for pupils and teachers, clerical assistance for school libraries 
was increased. Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties began 
cataloging and processing books for their school libraries, and 
Montgomery County expanded its service in this area to include 
audiovisual as well as printed materials. 

Increased demands for library materials by pupils at all 
grade levels reflect new techniques in teaching and point out the 
need for larger and more varied collections, for longer hours of 
service, and for increased personnel. Experiments with longer 
hours of library service are not always successful, due in part to 
the fact that there is not adequate staff to provide for the addi- 
tional hours. A study of school libraries conducted by the U. S. 
Office of Education shows that Maryland is considerably below 
the national average in ratio of school librarians to pupils en- 
rolled. 

Conscious efforts by local school systems to relate the library 
program more closely to instruction are indicated by the more 
frequent involvement of librarians in curriculum study commit- 
tees and by system-wide and area joint meetings of principals and 
librarians. Local inservice education opportunities for school li- 
brarians are increasing each year. Most new schools now open 
with at least a minimum size book collection, and several systems 
provide additional money for library materials for one or two 
years after a school opens. 

The Mount Royal Elementary School in Baltimore City was 
selected by the American Library Association as one of the five 
elementary schools in the United States to receive a Knapp Proj- 
ect grant. The purpose of the grant is to enable the school library 
to meet national school library standards for materials and staff 
in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of an adequately sup- 
ported school library. 

The supervisor of school libraries in the State Department 
of Education spent 58 per cent of her time in the field working 
with superintendents and general and special supervisors in the 
development of their programs. This included consultation on 
plans for library quarters in new schools, talking with groups of 
supervisors, principals, and librarians on the role of the library 
in their specific programs, participation in system-wide educa- 
tional conferences, planning with superintendents and supervi- 
sors for new additional personnel, advising with individual librar- 
ians, and in systems where there are no elementary librarians 
actually showing teachers and parents how to set up and operate 
a school library. Workshops for the last group were conducted 
in three systems. 



76 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

The Division of Vocational Education is responsible for the 
administration and supervision of all vocational education pro- 
grams in the State. It also administers the Federal funds avail- 
able for the development and improvement of preparatory and 
supplementary programs in the areas of : Agriculture ; Business ; 
Distributive Education; Home Economics; Practical Nursing; 
Technical and Trade and Industrial Education; as well as pro- 
grams for the training and retraining of unemployed and under- 
employed workers. Under the provisions of the State Law it 
administers the State Apprenticeship Council activities. 

Recent Federal legislation, the Vocational Act of 1963, has 
added further responsibilities in the areas of: special programs 
for the disadvantaged youth and/or unemployed youth and adults ; 
development and construction of area vocational schools. This 
entails new types of programs other than the traditional skills 
training programs, geared to labor market demands, national 
as well as local. Attention will be focused on: developing skill 
training for girls to earn wages; training agriculture students 
in allied fields ; developing new programs for teacher training and 
administration in the State institutions ; developing research and 
experimental programs and evaluative criteria. 

Agriculture 

Vocational agriculture education is not losing ground in 
Maryland despite the fact that national trends indicate a decline 
of farm employment. In 1964 it had some 3,700 students studying 
applied plant, animal, and soil science. Mechanical and technical 
skills are also taught in the classrooms and shops. To provide 
for a range of job opportunities greater than those on the farm, 
occupational courses have been added to the curriculum to pre- 
pare students for agricultural business and service occupations 
in agricultural cooperatives, corporations, and private enter- 
prises. 

In 1964 the Maryland members of the Future Farmers of 
America, the youth club, invested $715,000 in agricultural proj- 
ects. This club program fosters education as well as social and 
economic gain for its enrollees. 

The National Vocational Act of 1963 will permit greater 
emphasis to be given to the field of sales and marketing with 
on-the-job training under a cooperative program and classroom 
instruction in marketing and management. 

Of the 1964 June graduates of Maryland secondary school 
agriculture programs, approximately 10 per cent entered colleges 
or universities. The future is bright for Maryland youth in Voca- 
tional Agriculture. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



77 



Business and Office 

The business and office occupations training phase of the 
business education programs has always been a vocational one. 
Congress has recognized this fact by including business education 
in the National Vocational Act of 1963 as an occupational train- 
ing program. This inclusion will increase greatly the total voca- 
tional enrollment in Maryland, for business education job pre- 
paratory students far outnumber the enrollments of all the other 
vocational preparatory programs combined. 

Business education not only prepares youth for office and 
business occupations but also develops occupational information 
related to the environment in which the office functions and pro- 
vides practical tool skills that one may use personally. 

The most popular subject areas in business education in the 
secondary schools are typewriting, bookkeeping, stenography, 
and office machines. 

Distributive Education 

Nationally and in Maryland over one-half of our employed 
citizens are working in marketing and management service or 
sales occupations. The public school distributive education pro- 
gram prepares youth of high school age in marketing and man- 
agement and provides supplementary education to adults already 
employed in these fields. The high school senior students in a 
distributive education program generally receive on-the-job train- 
ing in the community on a cooperative basis and supplemental 
training in the classroom. Students in their junior year receive 
only classroom instruction. 

The Distributive Education Club of America, a national 
organization for DE students, has a very active Maryland Asso- 
ciation of DECA which conducted its first State Leadership Con- 
ference in 1964. 

With the current awakening to the need for job preparation 
for the noncollege-bound student, six counties are taking action 
to install DE programs in the near future. 

Home Economics 

Vocational home economics in Maryland is designed to serve 
a two-fold purpose : to prepare individuals for the responsibilities 
in homemaking and home management; child development; eco- 
nomic aspects of family living ; nutritional needs ; food selection 
and preparation ; selection, construction, and care of clothing and 
textiles; housing equipment and furnishing; and personal, family, 
and community relationships ; and to prepare for gainful employ- 
ment. In programs designed for gainful employment each stu- 
dent is expected to have an occupational objective which involves 
knowledge and skills in home economics subject-matter areas; 



78 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



i.e., child development, clothing and textiles, food and nutrition, 
home and institutional management, housing, interior design, 
and equipment. 

In order to prepare for new responsibilities stemming from 
the Vocational Education Act of 1963, two conferences for super- 
visors at the local level and home economics educators in colleges 
and universities were held for the following purposes : to discuss 
the Vocational Education Act of 1963 and the implications for 
home economics; to examine trends and developments in home 
economics occupational education programs and to explore re- 
sources available for programs of this nature; to examine areas 
of employment in which home economics knowledge and skills 
can be used and to establish guidelines for establishing such 
programs. 

An association for home economics teachers was organized 
at the State level. As the home economics programs at the second- 
ary level have expanded over the years, there has been a growing 
recognition of the need for an organization which would provide 
opportunities for teachers to meet and to assume leadership roles 
at the State level, to provide a means of professional growth and 
communication among the home economics educators in the State. 
Supervisors of home economics at the state and local levels will 
serve as advisers to the organization. 

The Future Homemakers of America, a national organization 
in secondary schools, plays a vital part in helping to develop more 
productive and rewarding individual resources. 

Health Occupations 

Health occupations education is a comparatively new voca- 
tional program in Maryland and will soon "take on life" with the 
new vocational concept that includes programs for other than 
the skilled and technical fields. Training for one health occupa- 
tion, the licensed practical nurse, has been offered for some years 
in Maryland. It can prepare high school girls or adults for the 
State examination as a Licensed Practical Nurse. The program 
is operated in cooperation with an approved hospital; the pre- 
clinical classroom work is done at the school, and the clinical 
training is carried on in the hospital. The adult program runs 
one year with four months preclinical and eight months clinical 
training. High school girls receive their preclinical work before 
their senior year and spend their senior year in the hospital. 

Technical 

Rapid changes in the industrial pattern of our nation have 
opened up many new opportunities for employment in the tech- 
nological fields, particularly for the "technician," the job that 
lies between that of the skilled tradesman and the engineer. 
Maryland has developed two parallel technician programs — one 



Maryland State Department of Education 



79 



running in both the comprehensive high school and vocational 
high school; and one in the community or junior college at the 
post-high-school level. In 1963-64, eleven high schools and five 
community or junior colleges offered 23 programs in ten different 
technologies. 

The high school program in 1963-64 enrolled 920 ; the college 
program enrolled 561. Together they served eleven communities 
of the State. The most popular program was Electronics 
Technology. 

Trades and Industry 

Enrollments in the high school programs of vocational trade 
and industrial education in Maryland have generally kept pace 
with the expansion of employment opportunities. Due to the 
growth and advancement of technology in the manufacturing, 
service, and construction industries and the need for more spe- 
cialized training and upgrading of skills, enrollments in day 
school and evening trade and industrial programs should continue 
to increase. 

During the 1963-64 school year, vocational programs were 
operated in 36 different trade or occupational areas. More than 
half were enrolled in the trades of auto mechanic, machinist, 
cabinetmaker, electrician, woodworker, bricklayer, and printer. 
The majority of the high school girls enrolled in trades and in- 
dustry pursued courses in cosmetology, dressmaking, and power 
sewing. 

The adult trade program enrolled over 5,000 persons. Of 
this total number, 1,072 enrollees were apprenticed to 12 different 
trades. Instruction was offered in 37 different trades or occupa- 
tions in the adult program. 

Experimental training programs in semiskilled and single- 
skilled occupations have been operated in several of Maryland's 
educational subdivisions. It is expected that these programs will 
gain much impetus because of the opportunities for this type of 
training under the National Vocational Act of 1963. 

Educational Services to Industry 

In cooperation with the Maryland Society of Training Di- 
rectors and McCoy College of The Johns Hopkins University, 
over four hundred supervisors and management people partic- 
ipated in a one-day seminar in March on "How to Overcome the 
Problems of Change." Dr. Gordon L. Lippitt of George Wash- 
ington University was the principal speaker. This was the eighth 
annual spring conference and has built up such a reputation for 
quality and participation activities that many are turned away 
each year due to restricted reservations. 

Over two hundred school business officials, principals, super- 
visors, head custodians, and maintenance men from nineteen local 
school systems, and eighteen colleges, state institutions, and 



80 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



county governments attended two concurrent three-day work- 
shops at Frostburg State College in June. The usual "Building 
Care and Operations" program was offered, with a new work- 
shop on "Fundamentals in Operation and Maintenance of Re- 
frigeration and Air Conditioning Systems." The latter was made 
possible by the cooperation of the Carrier Air Conditioning Com- 
pany who supplied their field engineers as instructors. This an- 
nual- workshop was co-sponsored by the Association of School 
Business Officials of Maryland and the District of Columbia. 

Vocational educators from Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West 
Virginia held their annual two-day, Four-State T & I Conference 
at Hancock, Maryland, in October to discuss "AVA Vocational- 
Technical Schools." 

Over one hundred and fifty persons attended the fall seminar 
of the MSTD at the University of Maryland campus at College 
Park, in November, to take part in the discussion of "Improving 
the Art of Instruction." Plans had been made for a maximum 
of fifty to attend, but the tripling of this number required a last- 
minute revision into three concurrent sessions. Dr. Don Maley, 
Professor and Head of the Department of Industrial Education, 
had chosen excellent speakers from the Food and Drug Admin- 
istration and the Federal Aviation Agency. 

This Division sponsored a one-day meeting in November for 
forty directors of nursing and their hospital superintendents to 
discuss the "Problem of Improving Nursing Management" pre- 
sented by Dr. Warren H. Schmidt and Dr. Kenneth M. Sowers 
of Leadership Resources, Inc., Washington, D.C. It was agreed 
that a future training workshop of five days with a follow-up 
of one or two days would be held. The Hospital Council of Mary- 
land and the Maryland League for Nursing will develop and 
sponsor this workshop. 

A member of this Division chaired a sectional meeting to 
discuss the Trades and Industry Program at the biennial con- 
ference on apprenticeship at Hershey, Pennsylvania, in August, 
sponsored by the Middle Atlantic States Apprenticeship and 
Training Committee. 

This Division assisted the Bata Shoe Company, Inc., of 
Belcamp, Maryland, in launching a supervisory training pro- 
gram. This company, an international one, prides itself on having 
been the first to inaugurate machines and mass production into 
the shoe manufacturing field. The first step in the program was 
a job instruction training for all levels of supervision. 

Guest lectures on "How to Determine Training Needs," were 
given to the industrial training class at the University of Mary- 
land, College Park Campus. 

Manpower Development and Training Act 

Increased enrollment, additional projects, and expansion 
into nine local subdivisions marked the advancement of Man- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



81 



power Development and Training- in Maryland. The number of 
trainees increased over 500 per cent. 

Persons unemployed due to job elimination through auto- 
mation, technical advancement, shifts, and market demands or 
lack of previous vocational training received training and place- 
ment in the following areas : auto body repair ; auto mechanics ; 
auto service station attendant ; clerk typist ; cook, entry ; licensed 
practical nurse; nurses aide; offset pressman; park caretaker; 
welder, combination. 



82 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



DIVISION OF CERTIFICATION AND ACCREDITATION 

The services of the Division of Certification and Accredita- 
tion for the year 1963-64 may be reported generally under four 
broad headings : 

1. Certification of teachers 

2. Accreditation 

3. Teacher education programs 

4. High school equivalence certificates 

Certification 

For the second year, electronic data processing has been a 
factor in the issuance of teachers' certificates. This process speeds 
certain phases of certification and enables the school systems to 
have many types of information not previously available. During 
the 1963-64 school year, there were 4,604 new principals and 
teachers employed in the Maryland county schools of whom 2,672, 
or 58 per cent, received regular certification. By regular certifica- 
tion, it should be understood that either the standard professional 
certificate or the advanced professional certificate was issued to 
these teachers. Of those not regularly certificated, 79 per cent 
held college degrees, showing a continued increase in the number 
of teachers employed on such substandard certificates who have 
completed work for at least the baccalaureate degree. Many of 
these teachers lack only 6 semester hours of recent college credit 
or several of the specifically required professional courses for 
full certification. 

Under certification requirements adopted in May, 1961, it is 
now possible to issue noncitizen teaching permits on an annual 
basis. For the year 1963-64, 43 noncitizen teaching permits were 
issued of which 10 were equivalent to a regular certificate. 

The requirements for certification adopted in May of 1961 
and November of 1962 have provided a measure of flexibility to 
the certification process and to some extent expedited the issuance 
of certificates. The provisions for accepting recommended grad- 
uates of institutions accredited by the National Council for the 
Accreditation of Teacher Education and reciprocity with states 
within the Northeast Reciprocity Compact area have contributed 
to this flexibility. Certificates can thus be issued without detailed 
evaluation of transcripts and many applicants may receive regu- 
lar certificates, whereas in the past an emergency or provisional 
certificate might have been issued due to failure to meet exactly 
specific requirements for the issuance of a Maryland teacher's 
certificate. 

Approximately 10,000 new certificates were issued during 
the school year 1963-64, reflecting the volume of renewals, 
changes in positions, and types of certificates and the increase in 
the number of teachers in private schools and State institutions. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



83 



Accreditation 

Institutions of Higher Learning 

During the academic year, no new community college pro- 
grams were given official approval to operate in the State . How- 
ever, all eleven of the public community colleges previously estab- 
lished continued to show increases in enrollments and other indi- 
cations of developing strength as colleges of the State. 

Members of the Department served on various committees 
of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools and assisted in the evaluation of college level programs. 
In addition, members of the staff served on committees appointed 
by the National Association of Colleges for Teacher Education 
in the evaluation of teacher preparation programs. Work with 
the Fulbright Scholarship Program continued to be a function of 
the Division, and a member of the staff worked with the Maryland 
State Committee on Fulbright Scholarships which met on De- 
cember 2, 1964, to select a panel of candidates for awards of 
Fulbright Scholarships. 

The approval of college-level programs for the training of 
war veterans and orphans was a continuing function of the Divi- 
sion. During the year, approvals were granted to 20 hospitals 
and schools of nursing and 46 colleges and universities. 

The preparation of an information sheet for publication by 
the Department on State-approved colleges and universities in 
Maryland was continued as a project of the Division. In this 
publication, the following categories were listed : 

16 two-year colleges 

29 four-year colleges and universities 

20 schools of nursing 

21 institutions approved for teacher education 
9 professional schools 

Staff members, assisted by consultants with extensive back- 
grounds in college administration, prepared five reports on eval- 
uations of the requests of various colleges for the right to award 
degrees. In some cases, the college concerned had not previously 
issued a degree of any kind, while in other cases, additional pro- 
grams were under consideration which involved the award of a 
degree other than those previously issued by the institution. 

Staff members worked with the community colleges and with 
the State Board of Education in developing a set of procedures 
for the accreditation of community colleges. In this connection, 
a staff member visited all community colleges to observe the 
implementation of standards and to assist in development of 
programs. 

The Assistant Director of the Division served during this 
academic year as Acting Executive Director of the Board of 



84 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



Trustees of State Colleges through November of 1963, at which 
time the Board of Trustees of the State Colleges appointed its 
first Executive Director. 

Nonpublic Elementary and Secondary Schools 

The number and kinds of academic schools below college 
level which were operating in this State in 1963-64 and which 
had been approved by the Department were as follows : 



Type of School Number 

Secondary 75 

Tutoring 7 

Nursery schools (only) 30 

Kindergarten (only) 32 

Combination of nursery schools and kindergartens .... 17 

Preschool through elementary 23 

Elementary (only) 9 

Elementary through secondary 7 

Preschool through secondary 2 

Special 28 



Total 230 



On the approved list of nonpublic academic secondary schools, 
there were 75 regular secondary schools and 7 tutoring schools. 
Of these 82 schools, 56 were church operated and 26 were pri- 
vately operated. There was an overall increase of 8 nonpublic 
secondary schools operating within the State. 

Nonpublic Nursery Schools, Kindergartens, Elementary Schools, 
and Special Schools 

These schools operated during 1963-64 in the following ways : 



Cooperatives with parents participating 28 

Cooperatives administered by parents who do not 

participate daily 4 

Small centers (proprietary — 3 groups or less) 36 

Larger centers (proprietary — 4 groups or less) 12 

Schools governed by boards of directors 33 

Church-sponsored centers 19 

Others (sponsored by housing projects, civic 

groups, colleges, etc.) 16 



Total 148 



Of this total, 47 schools indicated on the 1963-64 annual 
report that the school was incorporated as nonprofit. Twenty- 
four new schools were approved during the year. 

Special Programs — Day Care Programs 

During the 1963-64 school year, there were actually 19 
centers offering day-nursery or extended day-care programs as 
a part of the whole program. In 11 of these centers, the entire 
program was originally approved when the Maryland nonpublic 
school law, Section 25 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of 



Maryland State Department of Education 



85 



Maryland, became effective in 1948. In the remaining 8, only 
kindergarten and/or elementary programs are approved although 
nursery programs are available. 

School annual reports indicated that there were 460 pre- 
school age children enrolled for the full clay at centers which pro- 
vided day-nursery or extended day-care programs. There were 
also 253 children attending half-day sessions at these centers. 
Some of the children attending the approved programs in the 8 
schools mentioned above were also taken care of before and after 
school hours. There were 595 children in these programs. 

There were 12 centers where all or some of the children lived 
in the school 24 hours a day. Two of these were approved during 
the current year ; two of the schools are for girls only, three are 
for boys only, and seven of these schools are classified as special 
schools. 

Nonpublic Special Schools 

There were 26 nonpublic schools offering programs for hand- 
icapped children ; 7 of these were boarding schools. Programs 
are set up specifically for the retarded, 11 centers specifically for 
the emotionally disturbed and 8 centers specifically for disorders 
of the central nervous system. One center is specifically for vic- 
tims of cerebral palsy, 2 centers specifically for the blind, and 
one center for those with communicative disorders. Two pro- 
grams are organized for the multihandicapped. An additional 
2 centers are organized for preschool-age children. Children at 
any of these centers may have, and frequently do have, multiple 
handicaps. Of these 26 centers, 10 are church sponsored ; 13 are 
now directed by a governing board of one type or another ; 1 is 
partially supported by State appropriations ; and 2 are privately 
owned. There are 1,253 children enrolled in these special schools ; 
186 of the total have been placed in centers for the emotionally 
disturbed. 

Summary of Enrollment 

In all nonpublic academic programs below secondary school 
level which are approved by this Department, there are 9,242 
pupils enrolled. Enrollment may be broken down as to type of 
program as shown in the following table: 



Type of School Enrollment 

Nursery schools 1,888 

Kindergartens 1,996 

Elementary schools 4,105 

Special schools 1,253 



Total 9,242 



Nonpublic Specialized Schools 

In this classification, 21 schools applied for and received 
certificates from the State Superintendent of Schools under the 



86 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



Maryland nonpublic school law. The addition of these schools 
brings the total number of approved nonpublic schools offering 
instruction in specialized areas to 270. In addition, 7 new certif- 
icates were issued to formerly approved schools due to changes 
necessitating this procedure. Ten additional schools received 
tentative approval. 

During the academic year 1963-64, 11 schools which either 
had been tentatively approved or had been issued a certificate of 
approval ceased operations. 

A review on outstanding applications for the approval of 
schools was conducted and, as a result, the files on 123 proposed 
schools were placed in a closed status since they had failed to 
open or follow-up within a reasonable period of time after their 
original application had been made. Except in one case, all tuition 
unearned by schools which ceased operating during the school 
year was either made good or was in the process of being made 
good by instructional services, and students suffered no losses. 
The financial failure or the closing of a nonpublic school to which 
tuitions have been paid by the public before instruction is com- 
pleted is a serious matter to the individuals involved. Because 
of this fact, recommendations were made that steps be taken to 
have all schools collecting tuition in advance bonded for the 
amount of the unearned tuition since there is no tangible product 
involved which could be reclaimed by the individuals making pay- 
ments to the schools. It was also recommended that, where notes 
are to be used in payment for courses, carbon copies of the signed 
notes be given to the student. 

During the 1963-64 period, increased efforts were employed 
to establish procedures and enforce the requirements of Sections 
305-309 of Article 77, Annotated Code of Maryland, concerning 
the licensing of school solicitors. Approximately 125 out-of-State 
correspondence, correspondence-resident, and resident schools re- 
quested information and application forms for applying for so- 
licitors' permits. Of these schools, approximately two-thirds ac- 
tually applied for permits and 16 schools received 42 permits 
issued to cover their individual salesmen. 

During this report period, approximately 34,000 citizens of 
Maryland were enrolled as students by the nonpublic, specialized 
schools operating within the State, and over 1,200 teachers were 
employed by these schools. 

Teacher Education Program 

In the field of teacher education, one new program for the 
preparation of elementary teachers was given a tentative 
approval. 

During the academic year, a new publication was also com- 
pleted and distributed to schools and colleges and to local school 
systems for the first time. This publication is entitled "State- 
Approved Teacher Education Programs in Maryland Colleges 



Maryland State Department of Education 



87 



and Universities." It provides detailed information as to each 
program of teacher education offered in each of the various col- 
leges of the State. 

High School Equivalence Certificates 

There continues to be a steady increase in the number of 
candidates for the certificate of high school equivalence. During 
the year 1963-64, there were 3,748 requests for examinations, 
2,556 new applicants, and 1,192 repeaters. However, a great 
many failed to report for the examination at the time scheduled, 
and not all who did complete the series were successful. As may 
be seen in the table elsewhere in this report, the certificate was 
awarded to 1,455 candidates who completed the test provided 
through the State Department of Education and to 747 applicants 
applying on the basis of tests taken in the services through the 
United States Armed Forces Institute. To date, 29,675 candidates 
have earned the certificate, about a third of whom have resumed 
their education beyond the high school level. 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE 

The services of the Division of Administration and Finance 
include driver education, school transportation, school plant plan- 
ning, school lunch and special milk, direct distribution of com- 
modities, finance, State aid, personnel, and general administra- 
tion. 

The first major revision in the basic State Aid to Education 
Program, in effect since 1921, was made by the Maryland General 
Assembly in 1964. This legislation, which substantially changed 
the aid formula, will be effectuated in the fiscal year 1964-65. It 
establishes a foundation program which is represented as an 
amount to be expended annually per pupil for current costs and 
raises the dollar amounts of the elements which make up the 
program to levels approximating average practices throughout 
the State. These elements include a basic salary scale, minimum 
staffing level, and an amount for "other current expense" costs. 
The State encourages the local subdivisions to provide programs 
beyond the minimum guarantee by supporting a percentage of 
the cost for providing professional staff beyond the allowed mini- 
mum. Personal income as well as assessed valuation is now used 
to determine the local ability to support the foundation program. 
Previous inequities have been corrected in the present formula. 
This achievement represents a modernization and a refinement 
of a program of State aid and local financing of public education. 

School Lunch and Direct Distribution of Commodities 

State-wide there was a 5.6 per cent increase in participation 
in the School Lunch Program in 1963-64 over 1962-63. Only two 
local units had decreases. The rate of reimbursement remained 
at $.04 for the entire school year. 

Inservice training programs for school lunch personnel were 
continued with fifteen local units holding such programs during 
the school year. 

In compliance with the National School Lunch Program reg- 
ulations to assure adequacy of program operations, 344 admin- 
istrative reviews of school lunch program operations in individual 
schools were completed in Maryland during the 1963-64 school 
year. 

In the Special Milk Program there was a 3.6 per cent increase 
in participation in 1963-64 over 1962-63. 

The Maryland State Department of Education acting as a 
distributing agency of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, al- 
located Government-donated commodities to 905 public schools 
and 52 nonpublic schools which participated in the program. The 
total approximate value of food purchased by the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture for direct distribution to schools in the State 
of Maryland was $3,106,000. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



89 



Driver Education 

Offerings in driver education continued to increase through- 
out the State. All local boards of education for the first time in 
the history of Maryland offered courses in driver education to 
pupils enrolled in the school system. Several of the local school 
systems adopted policies which created a potential for every boy 
and girl to receive a minimum program of instruction in driver 
education. One locality adopted the policy for every newly con- 
structed secondary high school to contain a driver education lab- 
oratory as well as an installation of similators. The same policy 
was adopted for all additions to existing high schools. 

In close coordination with the Department of Motor Vehicles 
an appropriate form was developed to streamline the certification 
of driver education teachers by the State Department of Educa- 
tion, Division of Certification and Accreditation, and issuance of 
an instructor's card by the Department of Motor Vehicles, as 
required by Article 66V2 of the Annotated Code, Section 90 (e). 

Pupil Transportation 

Coordination with several of the State agencies resulted in 
improving the safety and the efficiency of the school bus opera- 
tion. 

The State Department of Health made available resource 
personnel in revising and updating physical examination forms 
for school bus drivers and revision of contents of first-aid kits. 
These were adopted by the State Board of Education and the 
Department of Motor Vehicles as required by law. 

The Department of Maryland State Police made available 
copies of all reported school bus accidents. 

In order to improve safety in the vicinity of schools, all 
schools located along State highways were reported to the State 
Roads Commission for appropriate signing. 

In cooperation with the Department of Motor Vehicles, that 
agency developed a certification form to determine school buses 
under contract to local boards of education, thus determining 
eligibility for school bus tags. 

These kinds of examples show a coordinated effort on the 
part of all State agencies in an attempt to use all available re- 
sources to improve the pupil transportation program. 

School Plant Planning 

New residential construction continued to generate the need 
for new educational plants, with much of the new schoolhousing 
in 1963-64 being in the form of additions to existing facilities, 
usually planned as part of the original buildings and now needed 
to meet the expanded enrollments. Alterations and remodeling of 
existing buildings represented a considerable portion of the capital 



00 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



expenditures. Total capital expenditures for schoolhouse construc- 
tion in the period 1963-64 amounted to more than $60,000,000. 

Contracts were awarded by the county school systems for 
construction work at 67 elementary and secondary schools. Con- 
struction projects, including additions, were completed at 85 
school sites in the counties and Baltimore City. 

The trends of reducing extensive fenestration and of pro- 
viding year-round thermal conditioning continued. Compact air- 
conditioned buildings were placed into operation in Montgomery 
and Prince George's counties ; construction contracts for similar 
type buildings were let in Anne Arundel and Frederick counties ; 
a new comprehensive junior high, with flexible teaching space, 
with a school within a school concept, tailored to meet the needs 
of individual pupils, was planned and construction started in 
Frederick County. 

The Harford Junior College completed construction of Phase 
I of its new facility; Montgomery Junior College broke ground 
for its new plant ; while the community colleges in Hagerstown, 
Catonsville, Essex, Charles County, and Prince George's County 
continued with their planning for new facilities. As Baltimore 
Junior College neared completion of its new plant, planning began 
for a second junior college to serve the City of Baltimore. 

During the period, the Survey of Public School Facilities 
was updated. 

Personnel 

As of June 30, 1964, there were 227 employees in the State 
Department of Education, 117 in Headquarters, and 110 in 
Vocational Rehabilitation. 



Maryland State Department op Education 



91 



division of research and development 
General 

The fundamental purpose of the Division of Research and 
Development is the improvement of the public educational enter- 
prise through the cooperative application of scientific techniques 
in the collection, analysis, and utilization of pertinent experi- 
mental and operational statistics and information. The Division 
furnishes services to the other divisions of the State Department 
of Education, the local school systems, the Federal Government, 
professional agencies and groups, and other interested organiza- 
tions and individuals. Such services include assistance in defining 
areas of investigation, identifying relevant data, designing ap- 
propriate data-gathering instruments and procedures, processing 
raw data, analyzing and interpreting processed data, formulating 
inferences, and developing operational conclusions. On the basis 
of these conclusions, existing practices may be evaluated and pro- 
grams for educational improvements may be implemented. The 
Division maintains a bank of basic educational data which may 
be drawn upon in connection with these services. The specific 
services performed by the Division depend upon the special needs 
of the recipients as well as the resources of the Division. 

Administrative Research and Statistical Section 

The revision in the State-aid-to-education laws enacted by 
the Maryland General Assembly in 1964 reflects a cooperative, 
long-range study conducted by the local school systems and this 
Department. Groundwork was begun in 1957-58 with the late 
Dr. Paul R. Mort as consultant. This Division, working with the 
Division of Administration and Finance, prepared the basic for- 
mulas to be used in the calculation of the 1964 school finance act. 

The staff of this section assisted in the administration of the 
program to distribute State and Federal aid to the local public 
school systems of Maryland. Included here are both the payment 
of State aid during the current year and preparation of estimates 
for the State budget. Assistance was also given to local super- 
intendents in providing estimates of State aid for local budgets. 

A looseleaf book entitled "Education in Maryland Data 
Bank" was issued in the summer of 1963. This publication is 
designed to aid the Department in disseminating data about 
education in the State on a more current basis than is done by 
the Annual Report and also serve as a means of presenting infor- 
mation in a more graphic form. The Data Bank fact sheets this 
year dealt with such subjects as: enrollment growth, increase 
in numbers of teachers, high school graduates, enrollments by 
subject and by class and school siEe. 

In cooperation with representatives of the Vocational Divi- 
sion, reimbursement forms for distributing Federal vocational 



92 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



education funds to local school systems were redesigned. This 
revision made it possible to use automatic data processing to pre- 
pare annual statistical reports to the United States Office of 
Education. 

The staff assisted in surveys on physical fitness and public 
school libraries in cooperation with the Divisions of Instruction 
and Library Extension. Staff members also participated in an- 
nual national surveys conducted by the United States Office of 
Education and National Education Association to provide current 
information on enrollment, staff, finance, and teacher supply and 
demand. 

The statistical portions of the Annual Report of the State 
Board of Education were prepared by this Division. 

The staff participated in State, regional, and national con- 
ferences related to the improvement and development of statis- 
tical and research functions affecting education at local, State, 
and federal levels. These included meetings of : 

American Association of School Administrators 
American Educational Data Systems 
American Association of School Business Officials 
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 
Committee on Educational Data Systems 

Northeast States Council for Educational Research and Statistics 
Southern States Council on Educational Research and Statistics 

In addition, two staff members represented the Department 
in an inservice training conference for research personnel in 
Salem, Oregon, March 24-26, 1964. 

Electronic Data Processing Section 

Automatic data-processing techniques have been used by the 
Department for processing financial and statistical information 
for a number of years, but during 1963-64 this service was greatly 
augmented by the use of magnetic tape. This improvement offers 
greater speed in processing as well as minimizing data storage 
requirements. 

A service, which has resulted in the saving of many hours 
of clerical and secretarial time, was made available to members 
of the Department enabling them to obtain mailing address labels 
prepared automatically by data processing. Thirty-one different 
mailing lists containing over 5,000 addresses are maintained. 

The major special projects of the Data Processing Section 
included the following: 

1. Design and completion of a survey of costs and services 
of Maryland public school transportation 

2. Computation of data on the facilities and services of 
Maryland public school libraries 

3. Updating the Maryland records of the National Inventory 
of School Plants and Facilities 



Maryland State Department of Education 



93 



4. Processing the results of a State-wide Youth Physical 
Fitness Program and computing State norms for future 
use by Maryland physical education teachers. Seven 
different test scores of 65,000 pupils were included. 

5. For the use of the U. S. Office of Education, a reporting 
system was developed whereby the Department can fur- 
nish, in a form that can be readily computer-processed, 
individual statistical data on professional staff personnel 
in the twenty-four Maryland public school systems. 

Instruction Research Section 

During the summer of 1963 and June of 1964 work was 
undertaken on abstracting published research in the areas of 
teaching effectiveness and pupil personnel services. A Maryland 
teacher and a State college staff member were employed for this 
purpose. Abstracts of significant and timely research studies are 
to be published periodically and circulated throughout the Mary- 
land public schools. 

In cooperation with the Division of Instruction, work con- 
tinued on the development of a proposal for research on educa- 
tional programming for emotionally handicapped elementary 
school children. Consultants were used to assist with the pro- 
posal, including representatives of the National Institutes of 
Mental Health, the Maryland State Department of Mental Hy- 
giene, and The Johns Hopkins University. 

In March, 1963, the proposal was submitted to the U. S. Office 
of Education for funding under Public Law 88-164. Late in the 
fiscal year the proposal was funded, and activities were begun in 
Anne Arundel County schools to implement the research design. 
Mrs. Rozelle Miller, Supervisor of Special Education in the Divi- 
sion of Instruction, is the chief investigator, and the Director and 
Supervisor of Instruction (Research) of the Division of Research 
and Development are consultants. 

Other research activities of the Section included involvement 
with the Schools of 1980 Study, furnishing staff services and 
financial support to the Maryland IRCOPPS project (Interpro- 
fessional Research Commission on Pupil Personnel Services), 
consulting with several local school systems desiring to submit 
proposals to the U. S. Office of Education under the Cooperative 
Research Act, developing instruments to inventory educational 
practices and innovations among Maryland school systems, assist- 
ing with the Frederick County project on language development 
for culturally limited elementary school children, and coordinat- 
ing the testing and evaluation of a pilot project for producing 
standardized pupil transcripts by automatic data processing (a 
system developed at the Educational Testing Service and recom- 
mended by the National Association of Secondary Schools and 
the Middle-States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.) 



94 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



Educational Television 

The Division continued to work cooperatively with the State 
Educational Television Advisory Committee, the local school sys- 
tems, institutions of higher education, and the Maryland Council 
for Educational Television, to develop plans for a State-wide 
system of educational television. Specifications for an engineer- 
ing survey of the State were prepared by the Division and the 
State Educational Television Advisory Committee, in conjunction 
with technical advisers from the local commercial television sta- 
tions and national ETV organizations. These specifications were 
refined as a result of meetings with the State Planning Depart- 
ment, the State Department of Public Improvements, and the 
State Department of Budget and Procurement. 

On July 11, 1963, authorization to proceed with a contract, 
for a fee of approximately $25,000, with the engineering firm of 
Jansky & Bailey, Washington, D. C, was received from the Board 
of Public Works. Under contract, the engineers moved ahead 
promptly with the survey of the State for educational television 
purposes and furnished an Interim Report to the Board in Jan- 
uary, 1964. The ETV Advisory Committee studied the engineers' 
report carefully and prepared its Second Report and Recommen- 
dations to the Maryland State Board of Education, acting as the 
State ETV Agency, for presentation at the February, 1964, meet- 
ing of the Board. 

Following the receipt of these reports the State Board of 
Education, acting as the State ETV Agency, passed resolutions 
for the following purposes : 

To endorse the proposal of the State Superintendent of Schools to the 
Governor under date of February 7, 1964, to implement a State-wide 
educational television system by providing funds for capital outlay and 
operating costs during the fiscal year 1964-65 for an initial educational 
television broadcasting facility in the Baltimore area. 

To endorse the recommendation of the State ETV Advisory Committee 
that the capital cost of providing open-circuit educational television 
broadcast and interconnection facilities be borne by the State, that 
matching Federal funds be requested where applicable, and that a 
minimum amount of programming be financed by State funds. 

To approve the recommendations of the Committee that a local coor- 
dinating advisory body be formed to represent in-school and out-of- 
school interests in broadcast coverage areas. 

To approve the recommendations of the Committee that a Petition and 
Comments be filed with the Federal Communications Commission re- 
questing that a minimum of two channels for educational television be 
allocated in the Baltimore area and a minimum of six additional chan- 
nels be provided for the remainder of the State at such locations as to 
serve most effectively the needs of all the citizens of the State. 

Unfortunately, the proposal of the State Superintendent of 
Schools to the Governor, of February 7, 1964, was not included 
in the Governor's supplemental budget. Accordingly, funds were 



Maryland State Department of Education 



95 



not provided for implementation of the State-wide ETV system 
for 1964-65. During- the remainder of the fiscal year, the engi- 
neers prepared their final report on the State-wide survey of the 
State for ETV purposes, and the State Department of Education 
continued the study of the implications for education of a State- 
wide system of ETV. 



96 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

The work of the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation ad- 
vanced in many directions during 1964. In every district of the 
State, increased services to the disabled were made available 
through the employment of additional counselors. An increase 
in the amount of case service funds to each counselor for the year 
allowed for the extension of services to a larger number of clients 
and for more intensive help to the severely disabled on the rolls. 
In spite of the fact that approximately one-fourth of the counsel- 
ing staff was new, a larger number of persons were rehabilitated 
into employment than in 1963. This was the fifteenth year of the 
past twenty in which the previous year's record was surpassed. 

The number of disabled persons rehabilitated in fiscal year 
1964 was 1,974, and the number served was 6,670, an increase of 
252 rehabilitants and 228 cases served over the previous year. 
The number of new referrals, 5,078, was an increase of 140 over 
the previous year and, added to the 5,879 cases carried over from 
the year before, brought the total caseload to 10,957 or an increase 
of 305 persons. 

The total cost of the Vocational Rehabilitation program in 
Maryland in 1964 was $1,633,761.33, of which $943,415.76 were 
Federal funds and $690,345.57 were State funds. The total ex- 
penditures amounted to less than the $1,720,933.20 which would 
have been the cost to maintain the rehabilitants on welfare for 
one year, and slightly more than one-third their annual earnings, 
which were $4,871,464. 

In an attempt to evaluate agency practices and to improve 
the quality of casework services to the handicapped individuals 
served by this Division, a Program Administration Review was 
completed in each of the four district offices. The staff committee, 
acting as a reviewing team, reviewed a total of 400 individual 
casework folders throughout the State. The results of these re- 
views were discussed with the district supervisors, and plans 
have been made for further staff training. 

The most noteworthy advances of the year in the program 
of the Division were those in the area of services for the mentally 
handicapped. On July 1, 1963, an Extension and Improvement 
Project, made possible in large part by the availability of Federal 
funds, was initiated for the purpose of expanding services to 
both the mentally retarded and those handicapped by the effects 
of mental illness. Under this project there was drawn up an 
agreement of cooperation between the State Board of Education 
and the State Board of Health and Mental Hygiene providing for 
the establishment of Vocational Rehabilitation units, operated 
jointly by the two boards, in State mental hospitals. 

Crownsville State Hospital was selected as the site of the 
first of these units. One of the hospital buildings was designated 
to house the unit, and, through enlargement and remodeling, was 
prepared to provide offices, training shops, and other space for 



Maryland State Department of Education 



97 



necessary functions. A program of psychological and counseling 
services was developed, and several vocational training courses 
were organized. By July 1, 1964, this unit was ready for opera- 
tion. Similar units will be developed in other hospitals in suc- 
ceeding years. 

Another significant advance was made in the provision of 
services to the mentally retarded. As a result of the late President 
John F. Kennedy's vital interest in this group, the United States 
Civil Service Commission was given special authority and instruc- 
tion to employ mentally retarded persons upon certification of 
qualification by state rehabilitation agencies. The Maryland Divi- 
sion took advantage of this program upon its initiation early in 
1964 and during the remainder of the fiscal year found satisfac- 
tory employment in Federal Government for 73 persons so handi- 
capped. This was 22 per cent of the total number of clients placed 
under this program by all of the country's rehabilitation agencies. 

Worthy of note also is the significant increase in the number 
of clients of the Division who were sent for training and other 
services to comprehensive rehabilitation centers in other states. 
Maryland's need for a facility of this kind is amply demonstrated 
by the constant increase in the number of persons referred to the 
Division whose handicaps are so severe as to require services that 
can be provided only in a comprehensive center. 

Throughout the year the Division continued to expand and 
improve its services in already established areas and programs. 
Under the leadership of the local vocational rehabilitation staff, 
a prosthetic and orthotic clinic was established in the Memorial 
Hospital at Easton to serve the lower Eastern Shore. This brings 
to five the number of such clinics in the State, in each of which 
the vocational rehabilitation counselor is an integral part of the 
clinic team. 

On the Eastern Shore also, in Worcester County, there was 
established in cooperation with the Maryland State Employment 
Service, an Employer Advisory Committee similar to those al- 
ready functioning in Cecil and Wicomico counties. These com- 
mittees continue to be very effective aids in securing jobs for 
Division clients who have been trained or otherwise readied for 
employment. 

The staff of the Southern Maryland District, in spite of an 
unprecedented turnover in staff through promotions, reassign- 
ments, and resignations, showed a marked increase in the number 
of persons successfully rehabilitated. Relations with the Health 
Department in Montgomery County were strengthened consid- 
erably by the assignment of a counselor to each Health Center 
for the purpose of making and receiving referrals and developing 
joint efforts in meeting the medical and vocational needs of the 
disabled. 

In Western Maryland, the group-counseling project previ- 
ously initiated in the Metropolitan Baltimore area was extended 



98 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



to Garrett County as a part of the all-out effort on the part of the 
Division, the Department of Public Welfare, and the Department 
of Employment Security to rehabilitate a group of disabled, un- 
employed miners whose vocational problems were numerous and 
seemingly insoluble. The group-counseling process produced 
striking effects in the rebuilding of morale and self-respect and 
was at least partially responsible for stimulating a number of 
clients to seek and find new fields of employment or to enter upon 
training programs to fit themselves for new jobs. 

In Washington County, a beginning was made in providing 
vocational rehabilitation services to eligible inmates of the Mary- 
land Correctional Institution-Hagerstown. This institution main- 
tains an average daily population of 700 youths from sixteen to 
nineteen years of age and an additional 500 to 600 under twenty- 
five years of age, many of whom are eligible for Division services 
by reason of physical or mental disabilities and have real poten- 
tial for rehabilitation. Lack of funds prevented any extensive 
development of services for this group, but it is expected that 
further accomplishments in this area will be forthcoming. 

The Metropolitan Baltimore District continued to refine and 
implement cooperative relationships with other agencies, public 
and private. Vocational rehabilitation services in The Johns 
Hopkins Hospital and Spring Grove State Hospital were im- 
proved by assigning full-time counselors to these institutions. 

The operation of the Disability Determination Unit followed 
the stable trends of the past few years. Increasing numbers of 
referrals and more especially of requests for reconsideration of 
claims denied were met by the employment of additional staff. 
As a result of a ruling in Federal Court that when a claim is 
denied and the claimant cannot return to his former employment, 
it is the responsibility of the Social Security Administration or 
the State Agency to demonstrate the applicant's ability to do 
other work. A training program has been initiated to render 
determiners competent to document the files of disallowed claim- 
ants with specific occupations in which the applicants might 
engage. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



99 



TABLE 1 — Actual Days Schools Were Open: Opening and Closing Dates: 
Maryland Public Schools: 1963-64 





Number 








Number 








Actual 


Opening 


Closing 




Actual 


Opening 


Closing 


Local Unit 


Days 


Dates 


Dates 


Local Unit 


Days 


Dates 


Dates 




Schools 


September, 


June, 




Schools 


September, 


June, 




Were Open 


1963 


1964 




Were Open 


1963 


1964 


Allegany 


184 


4 


12 


Harford 


180 


4 


12 


Anne Arundel. 


180 


5 


17 


Howard 


180 


5 


12 


Baltimore City 


183 


5 


18 


Kent ... 


180 


4 


12 


Baltimore .... 


184 


5 


17 












180 


5 


12 


Montgomery. . 


181 


3 


16 










Pr. George's. . 


180 


3 


12 


Caroline 


180 


5 


10 


Queen Anne's . 


181 


5 


12 


Carroll 


181 


3 


12 


St. Mary's. . . . 


184 


4 


12 


Cecil 


180 


3 


12 


Somerset 


183 


3 


5 


Charles 


180 


4 


12 








Dorchester . . . 


183 


3 


12 


Talbot 


181 


5 


12 










Washington . . 


180 


5 


12 




180 


5 


16 


Wicomico .... 


182 


5 


9 


Garrett 


183 


3 


9 


Worcester .... 


182 


3 


9 



100 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 2— Fall Enrollment— Grades N-12, Teaching Staff, Number of Schools: 
Public and Nonpublic: State of Maryland: 1963-64 



Type of School 


Grand Total 


Elementary 


High 


ENROLLMENT 


Total 

Public* 

Nonpublic 


849,079 
705,828 
143,251 


522,793 
407,454 
115,339 


326,286 
298,374 
27,912 


TEACHING STAFF 


Total 


35,346 
30,037 
5,309 






Public* 

Nonpublic 


15,668 


14,369 








NUMBER OF SCHOOLS 


Total 

Public* 


tl,558 

tLioi 

457 


1,270 
861 
409 


403 
291 
112 



* Includes enrollment, teaching staff, and number of campus schools at State Colleges, 
t Excludes duplicates. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



101 



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104 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 





CM 


41,216 


1,448 
2,626 
9,257 
7,230 
207 


ccocscof 
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999 
267 
1,054 
593 
164 


6,301 
5,278 
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242 
1,374 
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1,292 
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1,347 
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7,692 
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58,318 


1,705 
3,963 
14,912 
9,951 
292 


CO f— OJ -r" US 
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1,391 
358 

1,414 
839 
246 


7,968 
7,438 
281 
703 
335 


US 10 -f US 

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60,187 


1,708 
4,185 
15,935 
9,451 
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1,439 
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1,530 
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243 


7,991 
7,788 
348 
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53,740 


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1,304 
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1,458 
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6,975 
6,959 
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847 
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56,547 


1,422 
4,122 
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8,246 
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378 
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1,339 
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1,613 
760 
261 


7,615 
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Total 
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26,286 


9,439 
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tt81,270 
152,942 

1,930 


^2,039 
■5,601 
'4,720 
•3! 884 
■2,919 


^7,823 
2,213 
'8,525 
■4,538 
1,472 


15,013 
12,275 
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1,964 


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1,482 
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207 
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1,627 
1,410 

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1,656 
4,676 
16,047 
11,038 
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1,494 
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1,738 
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289 


9,163 
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69,547 


1,580 
4,948 
17,601 
11,406 
432 


413 
1,039 
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871 
545 


1,515 
475 
1,754 
1,044 
298 


9,380 
9,612 
347 
959 
399 


472 
1,756 
1,178 

497 


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72,674 


1,584 
5,116 
18,814 
12,037 
504 


403 
1,078 
1,111 
890 
592 


1,565 
422 
1,878 
1,031 
292 


9,604 
9,985 

371 
1,012 

397 


435 
1,864 
1,148 

541 


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75,215 


1,580 
5,401 
19,901 
12,117 
541 


408 
1,093 
1,165 
979 
570 


1,573 
432 
2,002 
1,131 
349 


9,445 
10,585 

389 
1,111 

400 


476 
1,922 
1,092 

553 


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78,769 


1,659 
5,471 
21,197 
12,740 
527 


467 
1,175 
1,140 
1,136 

613 


1,658 
499 
2,017 
1,173 
313 


9.458 
11,222 

408 
1,188 

429 


543 
1,980 
1,195 

561 




86,043 


1,768 
6,367 
23,026 
14,007 
585 


443 
1,284 
1,474 
1,313 

618 


1,788 
504 
2,289 
1,271 
388 


9,981 
12,251 

458 
1 398 

430 


539 
2,023 
1,243 

595 


Nu 


Kinder- 
garten 


35,472 


136 
964 
17,564 
2,395 
21 


CO CM US ■ O 

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9,692 
2,825 

150 


US CO us 

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3,027 


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US ■ Tfl CM • 
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1,261 
89 


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15,468 


219 
1,534 
6,339 
1,274 

123 


US CD us OJ 2 


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Total 
Ele- 
mentary 


co 
us 


10,641 
35,342 
147,889 
81,885 
3,159 


2,779 
6,957 
7,231 
6,424 
3,566 


CM CO OJ "SH CO 
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74,788 
69,082 
2,347 
7,473 
2,481 


3,064 
12,546 
7,191 
3,439 


Grand 
Total 


849,079 


20,080 
57,864 
229,159 
134,827 
5,089 


4,818 
12,558 
11,951 
10,308 

6,485 


17,965 
5.081 
20,794 
11,782 
3,458 


119,801 
111,357 

4,155 
11,338 

4,445 


5,104 
22,638 
12,022 

6,000 


Local Unit 


Total State 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . . 
Baltimore City . . 
Baltimore 


Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 


Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 


Montgomery .... 
Prince George's. . 
Queen Anne's . . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 


Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Maryland State Department of Education 



105 



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120 Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 22— Withdrawals* from Public Schools: Counties of Maryland: 1963-64 







Withdrawals by CoDEf 






Transferred to 






















Local Unit 


Total 


Other Schools 


























Wl 


W2 


W3&4 


Wo 


W6 


W7 


W8 


W9 


W10 


Wll 


W12 


W13 


W14 


ELEMENTARY 




OK SAQ 


y,yoy 


QAO 


1 A 7CQ 

14, / oy 






77 


22 


38 


341 


2 




63 


1 


A 11 


Z.KQ 


077 


o 


OKQt 


o 
o 




1 


1 




9 






2 




Anne Arundel . . . 


3,359 


1,116 


27 


2,125 


38 




6 


8 


4 


25 






10 
9 




Baltimore 


4,183 


1,444 


49 


2,558 


50 




20 






52 








Calvert 


238 


89 




141 


2 




1 






4 






1 






165 


35 




126 












3 








1 


Carroll 


506 


182 


2 


292 


8 




2 




2 


16 






2 




Cecil 


903 


320 


4 


560 


3 




2 






12 






2 




Charles 


452 


120 


4 


307 


8 




1- 


i 




7 






4 




Dorchester 


146 


33 




109 






1 






3 










Frederick 


727 


354 


3 


340 


6 




2 


i 


4 


17 










Garrett 


154 


56 


2 


81 


3 






5 




6 










Harford 


1,514 


565 


13 


884 


13 




1 




5 


29 






4 




Howard 


483 


90 


3 


380 


1 




1 




1 


7 










Kent 


130 


21 




103 


2 








1 


3 










Montgomery. . . . 


4,291 


1,862 


167 


2,178 


10 




12 




8 


43 






11 




Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's . . . 


5,280 


2,316 


56 


2,798 


29 




21 


3 


4 


45 






8 




139 


45 




91 








1 




2 










St. Mary's 


583 


149 


3 


406 


15 




i 






7 






2 






198 


47 




141 


1 




1 




i 


5 






2 




Talbot 


143 


51 




80 


1 




3 


1 


l 


6 










Washington 


944 


529 


6 


379 


2 






1 


4 


22 






i 




Wicomico 


499 


223 


1 


252 


4 




i 




3 


11 






4 




Worcester 


252 


45 




199 












7 


i 









HIGH 



Total Counties 


16,483 


2,643 


122 


6,059 


268 


316 


405 


5053 


36 


840 


69 


601 


54 


17 


Allegany 


438 


70 


2 


131 


11 


15 


6 


132 




29 


1 


37 


1 


3 


Anne Arundel . . . 


2,077 


247 


18 


760 


35 


36 


56 


717 


5 


124 


1 


72 


6 




Baltimore 


2,923 


413 


13 


1,016 


79 


100 


76 


1013 


5 


95 


21 


83 


9 




Calvert 


143 


3 




41 


1 




2 


79 




11 


2 


4 






Caroline 


135 


9 




48 




1 


6 


56 


2 


9 




3 




1 


Carroll 


348 


58 




119 


23 


6 


7 


105 


1 


10 


3 


14 


i 


1 


Cecil 


475 


51 


6 


205 


9 


11 


7 


132 


2 


12 


3 


33 


1 


3 


Charles 


328 


36 


4 


110 


2 


4 


13 


124 




19 




14 


1 




Dorchester 


133 


4 




59 






3 


36 




19 


i 


10 


1 




Frederick 


528 


99 


2 


145 


9 


1 


5 


187 


7 


31 


10 


24 


5 


3 




105 


7 




33 


1 


2 


2 


44 




10 




6 






Harford 


808 


116 


i 


361 


13 


1 


18 


219 


2 


31 


io 


32 


2 


i 




328 


19 


2 


154 


1 


3 


6 


110 




20 




12 


1 




Kent 


95 


1 




45 




1 


5 


24 




10 




8 


1 




Montgomery. . . . 


2,644 


646 


46 


1,084 


27 


52 


66 


475 


6 


142 


9 


81 


7 


3 


Prince George's. 


3,108 


644 


19 


1,108 


32 


61 


90 


931 




120 




94 


9 




Queen Anne's. . . 


146 


9 




45 






2 


77 




6 


i 


4 


1 




St. Mary's 


337 


12 


5 


169 


3 


5 


6 


108 




16 




12 


1 




Somerset 


154 


3 




64 


3 


2 


2 


57 




15 




6 


2 




Talbot 


110 


3 




34 


2 


1 


2 


44 




17 




6 


1 




Washington 


615 


161 


3 


132 


9 


6 


16 


237 


2 


22 




23 


3 




Wicomico 


331 


22 




129 


5 


5 


8 


95 


3 


44 




19 


1 




Worcester 


174 


10 




67 


3 


3 


1 


51 




28 


"i 


4 







* Withdrawals who did not re-enter during 1963-64 the school from which they withdrew — excluding kindergarten, 
t Codes: Wl — Transferred — public school in county W 8 — Age 16 or over 

W2 — Transferred — nonpublic school in county W 9 — Mental 

W3 & 4 — Transferred — outside county W10 — Physical 

W5 — Special case Wll — Economic 

W6 — Armed services W12 — Marriage 

W7— Committed to institution W13— Death 

W14 — Suspended 



Maryland State Department of Education 



121 



TABLE 23 — Number and Per Cent Nonpromotions: Maryland County High 
School Pupils: June Net Roll, 1964 



Local Unit 


June Net Roll 


Per Cent 
not Promoted 


Total 


Promoted 


Not Promoted 


Total Counties 


221,321 


211,876 


9,445 


4.3 


Allegany 


8,542 


8,356 


186 


2.2 


Anne Arundel 


20,757 


19,735 


1,022 


4.9 


Baltimore 


45,441 


43,694 


1,747 


3.8 


Calvert 


1,829 


1,784 


45 


2.5 




1,994 


1,972 


22 


1.1 


Carroll 


5,314 


5,177 


137 


2.6 


Cecil 


4,132 


3,891 


241 


5.8 


Charles 


3,475 


3,083 


392 


11.3 


Dorchester 


2,848 


2,673 


175 


6.1 


Frederick 


7,126 


6,885 


241 


3.4 




2,157 


2,124 


33 


1.5 


Harford 


8,273 


7,902 


371 


4.5 


Howard 


4,302 


4,163 


139 


3.2 


Kent 


1,425 


1,308 


117 


8.2 


Montgomery 


40,527 


39,258 


1,269 


3.1 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


38,441 


36,137 


2,304 


6.0 


1,664 


1,525 


139 


8.3 




2,732 


2,558 


174 


6.4 




1,903 


1,757 


146 


7.7 


Talbot 


1,863 


1,743 


120 


6.4 


Washington 


9,431 


9,187 


244 


2.6 


Wicomico 


4,672 


4,535 


137 


2.9 




2,473 


2,429 


44 


1.8 



Note: Policy of promotion and nonpromotion varies in the different counties. 



122 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 24 — Number, Per Cent, and Causes of Nonpromotion : Maryland 
County Elementary Pupils*: June Net Roll, 1964 









Number not Promoted by Cause 




Total 


Per Cent 










Local Unit 


not 


not 












Promoted 


Promoted 


Personal 


Irregular 


Imma- 


All Other 








Illness 


Atten- 


turity:}: 


Causes 










dance! 




Total Counties 


11,725 


4.2 


119 


324 


9,975 


1,307 




81 


1.0 


2 


4 


74 


1 


Anne Arundel 


1,451 


4.9 


20 


39 


1,362 


30 


Baltimore 


3,588 


6.5 


34 


37 


2,527 


990 


Calvert 


291 


9.7 


1 


17 


250 


23 


Caroline 


108 


4.1 




4 


101 


3 


Carroll 


283 


4.3 


1 


8 


272 


2 


Cecil 


425 


6.9 


7 


13 


399 


6 


Charles 


421 


8.6 


6 


55 


358 


2 


Dorchester 


80 


2.3 


2 




78 






74 


0.9 


1 


3 


70 






130 


4.7 


3 


6 


120 


1 


Harford 


582 


5.3 


4 


20 


519 


39 


Howard 


179 


3.3 


2 


7 


161 


9 


Kent 


118 


6.0 


3 


2 


101 


12 




848 


1.8 


12 


25 


654 


157 


Prince George's 


1,748 


3.4 


9 


49 


1,687 


3 




27 


1.2 




1 


26 




St. Mary's 


322 


7.6 


"l 


20 


284 


ii 


Somerset 


159 


6.5 




7 


143 


9 


Talbot 


170 


6.8 


"\ 


4 


165 




Washington 


147 


1.4 


2 


2 


136 


7 




397 


6.0 


1 




394 


2 




96 


2.9 


1 


i 


94 





* Excludes kindergarten and pupils attending campus schools at State Colleges, 
t Irregular attendance due to unfortunate home conditions. 
t Immaturity — social, intellectual, emotional. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



123 



TABLE 25 — Number and Per Cent of Nonprornotions in First Grade*: 
Counties of Maryland: June Net Roll, 1964 



Local Unit 


First Grade Enrollment 


Number and Per Cent not 


Promoted 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties. 


51,215 


26,728 


24,487 


4,618 


2,984 


1,634 


9.0 


11.2 


6.7 


Allegany 


1,405 


717 


688 


44 


26 


18 


3.1 


3.6 


2.6 


Anne Arundel 


5,632 


2,954 


2,678 


690 


439 


251 


12.3 


14.9 


9.4 


Baltimore .... 


10,092 


5,349 


4,743 


1,054 


702 


352 


10.4 


13.1 


7.4 


Calvert 


566 


287 


279 


63 


36 


27 


11.1 


12.5 


1.0 




452 


228 


224 


53 


28 


25 


11.7 


12.3 


11.2 


Carroll 


1,243 


656 


587 


122 


77 


45 


9.8 


11.7 


7.7 


Cecil 


1,290 


670 


620 


239 


148 


91 


18.5 


22.1 


14.7 


Charles 


1,048 


544 


504 


163 


99 


64 


15.5 


18.2 


12.7 


Dorchester . . . 


616 


324 


292 


39 


31 


8 


6.3 


9.6 


2.7 


Frederick. . . . 


1,542 


800 


742 


54 


31 


23 


3.5 


3.9 


3.1 


Garrett 


494 


271 


223 


46 


32 


14 


9.3 


11.8 


6.3 


Harford 


2,098 


1,143 


955 


228 


142 


86 


10.9 


12.4 


9.0 


Howard 


1,031 


533 


498 


90 


59 


31 


8.7 


11.1 


6.2 


Kent 


383 


207 


176 














Montgomery . 


7,640 


3,906 


3,734 


333 


222 


iii 


4.3 


5.7 


3.0 


Pr. George's. . 


9,898 


5,097 


4,801 


906 


573 


333 


9.1 


11.2 


6.9 


Queen Anne's. 


441 


244 


197 


1 




1 


0.2 




0.5 


St. Mary's. . . . 


866 


443 


423 


126 


92 


34 


14.5 


20.8 


8.0 




423 


239 


184 


68 


47 


21 


16.1 


19.7 


11.4 


Talbot 


460 


240 


220 


81 


50 


31 


17.6 


20.8 


14.1 


Washington . . 


1,867 


939 


928 


41 


29 


12 


2.2 


3.1 


1.3 


Wicomico .... 


1,145 


609 


536 


115 


77 


38 


10.0 


12.6 


7.1 


Worcester. . . . 


583 


328 


255 


62 


44 


18 


10.6 


5.5 


7.1 



Excludes pupils in first grade of campus schools at State Colleges. 



124 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 26— Public High School Graduates: State of Maryland: 1954-55—1963-64 





High School Graduates 


Year 








Local Unit 










Total 


Boys 


Girls 


1954-55 


15,161 


7,313 


7,848 


1955-56 


16,767 


8,019 


8,748 


1956-57 


17,122 


8,368 
8,891 


8,754 


1957-58 


18,380 


9.489 


1958-59 


20,462 


9,861 


10,601 


1959-60 


23,854 


11,560 


12,294 


1960-61 


26,923 


13,142 


13,781 


1961-62 


26,533 


13,015 


13,518 


1962-63 


28,534 


14,299 


14,235 


1963-64 


34,271 


17,049 


17,222 



BY LOCAL UNIT, 1963-64 



1,265 


643 


622 


2,426 


1,175 


1,251 


6,599 


3,381 


3,218 


5,674 


2,801 


2,873 


198 


110 


88 


264 


143 


121 


709 


334 


375 


503 


241 


262 


370 


171 


199 


335 


192 


143 


879 


428 


451 


264 


139 


125 


1,042 


490 


552 


569 


293 


276 


157 


66 


91 


5,399 


2,636 


2,763 


4,646 


2,307 


2,339 


187 


94 


93 


273 


139 


134 


223 


113 


110 


215 


113 


102 


1,256 


645 


611 


540 


262 


278 


278 


133 


145 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . 
Baltimore City. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Maryland State Department of Education 



125 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



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167 



TABLE 56 — Driver Education Enrollment: Maryland Public High Schools: 

Fall of 1963 



T.ApAT. TTWIT 


Total Driver 
Education. 


Driver Education 


Classroom 


Practice 


Classroom 
and 
Practice 


Total State 


11,601 








Alleganv 


579 






O lit 


Anne Arundel* 










Baltimore City* 










Baltimore 


1,258 


114 


13 


1 i 3 1 


Calvert 


74 


OO 




A 1 




298 


one 




t\9 

Di 


Carroll* 










Cecil 


462 


462 






Charles* 












'60 






35 


Frederick 


836 


750 




86 




340 






340 


Harford 


703 






703 












Kent 


i88 


'47 




iii 


Montgomery 


3,419 


454 


301 


2,664 


Prince George's 


1,235 


101 


45 


1,089 


Queen Anne's 


401 


130 


142 


129 


St. Mary's 


185 






185 












Talbot 


204 


92 


92 


20 




364 






364 


Wicomico 


826 


609 


'24 


193 




169 






169 



* Driver Education in thesa units is offered during out-of-school hours only 



TABLE 57 — Special Education Enrollment: Maryland Public High Schools: 

Fall of 1963 



Local Unit 



Total 
Special 
Education 



Special Education 



Junior 
High 



Senior 
High 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . 
Baltimore City. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



11,725 

31 

835 
5,927 
690 



32 
186 
251 
93 
14 

87 

2i9 
300 
119 

1,816 
391 



81 



529 
66 
58 



10,485 

31 
688 
5,879 
468 



173 
251 
93 
14 

87 

194 
300 
119 

1,255 
391 

'81 



397 
42 



1,240 



147 
48 



■2n 



561 



132 
24 
36 



TABLE 58 — Number of Different Individuals Teaching and Number of 
Public High Schools Offering Each Subject: State of Maryland: Fall of 1963 



Local Unit 


English 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


Other 

TPfir-ni crn 

Lan- 
guages 


SocijiI 
Studies 


ivianic- 
matics 


Science 


Business 
Educa- 
tion 


Arts 
and 
Crafts 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 




o 


cq 


(D 


42 




42 


a> 


02 


£ 

ct> 


02 


£ 


42 


£ 


02 


£ 


JD 


eu 


43 


<D 


42 




JS 


O 


JS 


o 


js 


o 


JS 




J3 

CI 


"o 


J= 

O 


© 


J= 


"o 


_c 




JS 




JS 






cj 

<u 
EH 


o 

C3 

CO 


e3 

Eh 


o 

CO 


o> 
EH 


o 

JS 

o 

CO 


a 

a> 
EH 


o 
"o 

CO 


CS 
V 

EH 


o 

JS 

a 
CO 


c3 

Eh 


o 

o 
CO 


o 
e3 
CD 

EH 


o 

o 
CO 


e« 

Qj 


O 


o 

CD 


o 

o 

co 


CD 


o 

o 
CO 


CI 


3,147 


292 


138 


122 


442 


231 


188 


118 


42 


39 


2,742 


292 


1,842 


292 


1,863 


289 


925 


187 


390 


219 


Allegany 


00 


11 


7 


5 


9 


7 


3 


2 


*1 


*1 


80 


11 


55 


11 


49 


11 


38 


8 


11 


9 


Anne Arundel. 


292 


18 


g 


5 


26 


13 


g 




*2 


*2 


278 


18 


209 


18 


117 


15 


fin 


Q 


^41 


1 8 
10 


Baltimore City 


521 


42 


27 


20 


83 


35 


33 


21 


*18 


*14 


433 


42 


347 


42 


318 


42 




QO 

o» 




Baltimore 


567 


33 


21 


20 


68 


33 


54 


30 


t4 


t7 


540 


33 


242 


33 


271 


33 


112 


17 


88 


33 


Calvert 


30 


4 


1 


1 


4 


3 


1 




*1 


*1 


20 


4 


15 


4 


14 


4 


9 


2 


4 


4 


Caroline 


40 


g 


2 


2 


5 


5 


j 








23 


g 


18 


8 


21 


8 


14 


3 


7 





Carroll 


57 


l\ 






10 


g 


j 








53 


2 j 


40 


22 


42 


22 


24 


7 


1 1 
i i 


7 


Cecil 


43 


7 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 








49 




33 




33 


7 




c 



e 



ct 



Charles 


44 


8 


1 


1 


4 


3 










35 


8 


30 


8 


29 


8 


16 


4 


5 


4 


Dorchester. . . . 


32 


7 


3 


3 


4 


3 










29 




22 


7 


23 


7 


13 


4 


6 


6 


Frederick 


97 


9 


6 


6 


9 


8 


1 








91 


9 


51 


9 


50 


9 


28 


6 


13 


9 


Garrett 


26 


5 






3 


2 










23 


5 


16 


5 


17 


5 


8 


2 


6 


5 


Harford 


104 


8 


5 


5 


13 


7 


4 


2 






94 


8 


61 


8 


61 


8 


34 


7 


15 


8 


Howard 


42 


7 


2 


2 


9 


7 


2 


2 






37 


7 


25 


7 


31 


7 


13 


3 


5 


4 


Kent 


17 


4 


2 


2 


4 


4 










18 


4 


16 


4 


14 


4 


9 


4 


2 


1 


Montgomery . . 


423 


31 


28 


27 


104 


31 


26 


12 


*8 


*7 


292 


31 


240 


31 


219 


31 


96 


18 


62 


31 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. 


460 


37 


11 


9 


46 


27 


40 


24 


t6 


t5 


389 


37 


216 


37 


355 


37 


111 


14 


77 


37 


26 


4 






4 


4 






25 


4 


16 


4 


12 


4 


14 


4 


4 


3 


St. Mary's. . . . 


30 


6 


i 


i 


4 


4 


2 


2 






28 


6 


24 


6 


32 


6 


12 


5 


6 


6 


Somerset 


23 


7 






5 


5 










28 


7 


20 


7 


21 


7 


14 


6 


1 


1 


Talbot 


18 
87 
52 

28 


3 
12 
6 
4 


i 

8 
3 


1 

6 

3 


4 
9 
7 
5 


2 
7 
6 
4 










19 
77 
51 
30 


3 
12 
6 
4 


14 
72 
41 
19 


3 
12 
6 
4 


17 
61 
39 
17 


3 
12 
6 
4 


7 
30 
17 
10 


3 
7 
5 
4 


10 
7 
3 


9 
6 
4 


Washington. . . 
Worcester 


7 
5 


10 

3 


*2 


*2 





Art 


Music 


Agri- 
culture 


Home 
Eco- 
nomics 


Physical 
Educa- 
tion 


Industrial 
Work 


Driver 
Education 


Special 
Education 


Adminis- 
tration, 
Super- 
vision 


Guidance 


Library 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Local Unit 
































02 


















£ 




■r. 


CO 
CP 


02 


2 

CD 


03 


2 

CO 




g 


43 


02 
CD 


42 


n 

CP 


43 




CO 


2 


CO 


CO 


-i 


CO 
CJ 


CO 




JS 




§ 


JS 


"o 


JS 


"o 


JS 


-1 


JS 


z 


JS 


§ 


JS 


§ 


JS 


1 


JS 


"o 


JS 






1 




Tea( 




JS 

o 
CO 


Tea< 


o 

JS 

o 
CO 


Tea( 


o 

JS 

o 
CO 


Tea( 


o 

JS 

CO 


Tea< 


o 

a 
CO 


Tea< 


o 
CO 


Tea< 


o 

CO 


Tea. 


CO 


Tea< 


o 

JS 

u 
CO 


Teai 


o 

JS 

o 
CO 


Teai 


JS 

a 
CO 


Total State 


151 




64 


678 


292 


66 


59 


653 


271 


1,221 


300 


1007 


276 


126 


109 


438 


141 


677 


297 


658 


284 


359 


276 


Allegany.. 








19 


11 


1 


1 


19 


9 


31 


11 


24 


9 


7 


6 


1 


1 


21 


10 


11 


8 


11 


8 


Anne Arundel 








48 


17 


1 


1 


48 


13 


69 


18 


51 


14 






21 


9 


39 


18 


36 


16 


21 


16 


Baltimore City . 


112 




41 


110 


49 






160 


42 


229 


50 


359 


48 






244 


35 


120 


50 


160 


50 


51 


39 


Baltimore 








103 


33 


2 


2 


89 


33 


189 


33 


130 


33 


20 


16 


42 


26 


103 


33 


102 


33 


67 


33 


Calvert 








7 


4 


1 


1 


5 


3 


12 


4 


5 


3 


2 


2 






10 


4 


9 


4 


5 


4 


Caroline 


1 




1 


12 


8 


4 


3 


8 


8 


19 




10 


8 


3 


3 


2 


2 


9 


7 


9 


8 


8 


8 


Carroll 








21 


11 


6 


4 


15 


10 


31 


11 


18 


9 






3 


2 


21 


11 


11 


8 


11 


11 


Cecil 








12 


7 


2 


2 


10 


7 


25 


7 


14 


7 


'8 


6 


5 


4 


14 


7 


10 


7 


7 


6 


Charles 








14 


8 


5 


4 


9 


6 


19 


s 


7 


5 






1 


1 


13 


8 


9 


7 


7 


7 


Dorchester 








10 


6 


2 


2 


6 


5 


18 


: 


6 


4 


2 


2 


1 


1 


12 


6 


6 


4 


5 


5 


Frederick 








24 


9 


6 


5 


16 


9 


36 


9 


16 


9 


7 


7 


5 


4 


19 


9 


18 


9 


11 


9 


Garrett 








5 


2 


3 


2 


5 


2 


12 


5 


4 


2 


1 


2 






7 


5 


3 


2 


5 


4 


Harford 








21 


8 


3 


2 


17 


8 


30 


8 


25 


8 


7 


7 


i5 


5 


18 


8 


14 


8 


9 


8 


Howard 








16 


7 


1 


1 


11 


6 


20 


7 


15 


6 






5 


3 


14 


7 


12 


7 


9 


7 


Kent 








7 


4 


2 


2 


6 


4 


8 


4 


5 


4 


3 


4 


3 


3 


7 


4 


6 


4 


4 


4 


Montgomery. . . 








71 


31 


3 


3 


66 


31 


180 


31 


127 


33 


25 


14 


35 


11 


92 


32 


103 


32 


43 


31 


Princ e Geo-ge's 








102 


37 


5 


4 


103 


37 


187 


37 


119 


37 


15 


14 


25 


14 


94 


37 


86 


37 


39 


37 


Queen Anne's 








6 


4 


3 


3 


5 


4 


9 


4 


3 


3 


4 


4 






4 


4 


5 


4 


4 


4 


St. Mary's 








10 


6 


2 


2 


7 


6 


15 


6 


8 


6 


4 


5 


4 


4 


12 


6 


6 


6 


6 
12 


6 


Somerset 








5 


5 


2 


2 


4 


4 


15 


7 


3 


3 










7 


6 


5 


5 


5 


Talbot 








6 


3 


2 


2 


5 


3 


8 


3 


5 


3 


2 


2 






6 


3 


4 


3 


3 


3 


Washington .... 








29 


12 


5 


4 


24 


11 


33 


12 


34 


12 


8 


6 


is 


11 


19 


12 


18 


12 


11 


11 


Wicomico 








11 


6 


3 


4 


8 


6 


18 


6 


12 


6 


4 


5 


5 


4 


11 


6 


10 


6 


6 


6 


Worcester 








9 


4 


2 


3 


7 


4 


8 


4 


7 


4 


4 


4 


3 


1 


5 


4 


5 


4 


4 


4 



* German. 

t Includes 1 teacher and 3 schools teaching Russian and 3 teachers and 4 schools teaching German in Baltimore 
Country; includes 2 teachers and 2 schools teaching Russian and 4 teachers and 3 schools teaching German in Prince 
George's County. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



169 



TABLE 59 — Average Number of Pupils Belonging per Teacher 
and Principal: State of Maryland: 1954-55—1963-64 



Average Number Belonging per Teacher 



Year 

Local Unit 


and Principal 


Total 


xiilementary 




1QKA KS 


26.8 


30.4 


22.0 




26.8 


30.4 


22.0 


1956-57 


26.3 


30.0 


21.7 


1957-58 


25.1 


28.0 


21.5 


1 QtR— 


24.6 


27.3 


21.4 


1 n en 


24.2 


26.9 


21.2 


1 Qfin_fi1 


23.9 


26.6 


21.0 


1961-62 


25.1 


28.2 


21.9 


1962-63 


23.1 


25.7 


20.3 




23.3 


25.9 


20.5 


BY LOCAL 


UNIT, 1963-64 






Allegany 


24.6 


26.5 


23.1 


Anne Arundel 


23.5 


24.9 


21.8 


Baltimore City 


24.8 


27.9 


21.0 


Baltimore 


21.5 


23.1 


19.9 


Calvert 


23.5 


26.9 


19.5 


Caroline 


21.2 


26.0 


17.1 


Carroll 


23.5 


27.1 


20.2 


Cecil 


24.3 


27.6 


20.8 


Charles 


22.0 


25.1 


18.8 


Dorchester 


24.1 


27.1 


21.3 


Frederick 


21.5 


22.1 


20.0 


Garrett 


25.3 


26.0 


24.6 


Harford 


24.2 


26.5 


21.7 


Howard 


23.3 


25.9 


20.8 


Kent 


21.1 


24.6 


17.6 


Montgomery 


22.8 


25.5 


19.9 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


22.6 


25.5 


19.6 


23.3 


25.6 


18.9 


St. Mary's 


23.5 


27.9 


18.8 


Somerset 


22.7 


25.8 


19.7 


Talbo^ 


24.1 


26.5 


21.6 


Washington 


25.0 


27.5 


22.6 


Wicomico 


23.9 


27.3 


20.4 


Worcester 


24.2 


28.0 


20.4 



*Excludes kindergarten and campus schools at State Colleges. 



170 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 60 — Number and Per Cent of Schools, Teachers, Pupils: One-Teacher* 
Elementary Schools: Counties of Maryland: 1922-23—1963-64 



One-Teacher Elementary Schools* 



Year 














Number of 


Per Cent of 


Per Cent of 


Pupils in One- 


Per Cent of 


Local Unit 


One-Teacher 


Total Ele- 


Total Ele- 


Teacher 


Total Ele- 




Schools 


mentary 


mentary 


Schools 


mentary 






Schools 


Teachers 




Pupils 


1922-23 


1,496 


69.9 


39.6 


t 




1927-28 


1,206 


65.1 


31.7 


t 




1932-33 


740 


53.2 


20.3 


t 




1937-38 


560 


48.1 


15.4 


t 




1942-43 


275 


31.4 


7.8 


7,546 


' 5.8 


1954-55 


30 


4.5 


0.5 


753 


0.4 


1955-56 


24 


3.7 


0.3 


595 


0.3 


1956-57 


23 


3.9 


0.3 


584 


0.3 


1957-58 


17 


2.1 


0.3 


410 


0.2 


1958-59 


11 


1.2 


0.1 


278 


0.1 


1959-60 


12 


1.8 


0.1 


300 


0.1 


1960-61 


10 


1.3 


0.1 


281 


0.1 


1961-62 


10 


1.5 


0.1 


267 


0.1 


1962-63 


9 


1.3 


0.1 


196 


0.1 


1963-64 


10 


1.2 


t 


226 


t 


BY LOCAL UNIT, 1963-63 




6 


28.6 


4.6 


133 


3.8 


Garrett 


1 


5.9 


0.9 


28 


1.0 




1 


6.7 


0.5 


21 


0.4 


Somerset 


1 


6.7 


1.0 


17 


0.7 


Talbot 


1 


8.3 


1.0 


27 


1.1 



*Schools having a one-teacher organization of grades one to five or more. 
fData unavailable. 
JLess than 0.1 per cent. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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173 



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174 Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 

TABLE 64— Number of Public Schools by Size of Staff: State of Maryland: 1963-64 



Number of 
Teachers 

AND 

Principals 



















































-r 


o 


























>> 




~<v 












egany 


ne Arur 


| Baltimore 1 


Itimore 


lvert 


roline 


rroll 




arles 


rchester 


:derick 


rrett 


rford 


ward 


a 


mtgome 


nee Geo 


een Ann 


Mary's 


nerset 


:bot 


shingtoi 


3omico 


< 


e 
< 


pq 


o 


03 

o 


O 


O 


d 


a 




c« 

O 


H 


o 










EG 




sa 
Eh 







ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (1-6) 



873 


29 


62 


156 


93 


14 


9 


19 


19 


12 


21 


27 


17 


21 


15 


n 


106 


117 


10 


16 


15 


12 


38 


21 


13 


10 




















6 




l 




1 








. 




1 


1 








26 


i 




i 




3 




1 








i 


3 


I 


1 


3 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 




1 




2 


32 


2 




1 










i 






3 


2 




2 


3 


1 


1 


2 




2 


i 


3 


*2 


2 


29 


1 


2 


3 








1 


2 




I 


1 


1 










1 




i 


1 




6 


6 


2 


23 


1 


2 


1 






2 










1 


3 








'i 


3 




l 


2 


i 


2 






32 


2 


1 


3 


1 


2 




1 


i 


i 


I 




2 








l 


2 


"i 


2 


1 


5 


3 


i 




27 


2 


1 


1 




1 


2 




i 


2 


I 


*3 


1 


2 






3 


1 


l 


1 






1 


1 




25 


6 


3 


5 




1 




I 


l 


1 
















4 






2 




1 






27 


1 


2 


5 


*2 


3 










* 


i 


i 


: j 






3 


2 




i 


1 




1 




i 


22 


1 


1 




3 


1 


2 


.] 


3 






l 










1 


5 




2 






1 






33 




3 


6 


1 










i 




2 










4 


5 


i 


2 


1 




3 


i 


i 


48 


*5 


7 


8 


2 








i 


l 




1 


i 




i 




6 


8 


l 




1 




1 


1 




38 


1 


1 


4 


3 










l 






1 




1 




10 


5 


l 


i 






3 


1 


i 


29 




3 


4 


1 








i 








1 




1 




9 


4 


l 








2 






42 


i 


3 


3 


2 








2 


2 




3 




3 


1 




6 


7 










3 


i 


i 


41 


l 


2 


9 


2 




i 




1 






2 




3 


3 




4 


5 




1 






2 


3 




44 


l 


4 


7 


2 




1 




2 






1 










9 


6 




1 






1 


1 


2 


31 


l 


1 


3 


2 








2 






1 










7 


10 












1 


l 


26 


l 


1 


5 


2 








1 






2 










6 


5 
















22 




4 


6 


2 




















i 




4 


3 
















27 




2 


4 


2 
























7 


9 
















22 






3 


5 




















i 




2 


9 
















26 




2 




6 




















l 




3 


5 
















18 




4 




5 














i 










2 


2 
















14 




3 




2 














l 






i 




1 


2 
















16 








3 














l 










4 


1 
















16 




i 




2 
























3 


3 
















20 






8 


1 














i 










4 


4 
















15 




i 


6 


5 
























1 


1 
















15 






3 


8 
























1 


2 
















14 




i 


6 


6 










































11 






3 


7 










































13 




1 


4 


5 
























1 


1 
















9 




1 


5 


2 










i 
































30 




5 


13 


9 


















2 






i 



















All Schools.... 

1.0-1.9. . . . 

2.0-2.9. . . . 

3.0-3.9... . 

4.0-4.9. . . . 

5.0-5.9.... 

6.0-6.9. . . . 

7.0-7.9. . . . 

8.0-8.9. . . . 

9.0-9.9. . . . 
10.0-10.9. 
11.0-11.9. . . 
12.0-12.9. . . 
13.0-13.9. . . 
14.0-14.9. . . 
15.0-15.9. . . 
16.0-16.9. . . 
17.0-17.9. . . 
18.0-18.9. . . , 
19.0-19.9. 
20.0-20.9. . . . 
21.0-21.9. . . . 
22.0-22.9. . . . 
23.0-23.9. 
24.0-24.9. . . . 
25.0-25.9. . . . 
26.0-26.9. 
27.0-27.9. 
28.0-28.9. . . . 
29.0-29.9. . . . 
30.0-30.9. . . . 
31.0-31.9. . . . 
32.0-32.9. . . . 
33.0-33.9. . . . 
34.0-34.9. . . . 
35.0 and over 



JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS (7-12) 



All Schools 

1.0-2.9 

3.0-4.9 

5.0-6.9 

7.0-8.9 

9.0-10.9.... 
11.0-12.9. . . . 
13.0-14.9. 

15.0-16.9 

17.0-18.9. 
19.0-20.9. 

21.0-22.9 

23.0-24.9. . . . 
25.0-29.9.... 

30.0-34.9 

35.0-39.9. . . . 
40.0-44.9.... 
45.0-49.9. . . . 
50.0-54.9. . . . 
55.0-59.9. . . . 
60.0-64.9. . . . 
65.0-69.9. . . . 
70.0-74.9. . . . 
75.0-79.9. . . . 
80.0-84.9. . . . 
85.0-89.9. . . . 
90.0-94.9. . . . 
95.0-99.9. . . . 
100.0 and over 



300 


11 


16 


51 


34 


4 


8 


n 


7 


8 


7 


9 


4 


8 


7 


4 


32 


37 


4 


6 


7 


3 


12 


6 


3 




















2 




















1 








5 












i 






i 






'2 
























6 












1 






2 






























6 


i 










1 




































7 












2 






i 










i 
















1 




5 


2 


i 












































9 


2 




3 






















i 




















5 




i 


2 








































i 


7 






3 






































i 


1 


6 




i 




























i 




i 


i 






1 




11 






i 






i 
























1 


1 










10 






i 












"i 










i 








1 


2 






i 




17 


i 










i 




2 






2 






1 






2 


1 


1 






3 




18 






3 


i 


i 


i 




1 












1 




i 


3 




i 






2 


1 


26 


2 




3 




1 






3 


2 




3 










2 


6 










1 




22 


1 


i 


2 


i 






2 








1 










2 


8 














16 






2 


4 










i 










i 




1 


6 














17 




i 




1 




















1 




5 


4 












'2 


17 




l 


2 


5 
























6 


1 












1 


12 




l 


2 


4 














i 










4 
















10 




l 




6 














1 










1 


1 














11 




i 


1 


3 


















2 






2 


1 














4 




3 




























1 
















7 




2 


2 


2 
























1 
















9 






2 


2 
























1 


i 














11 




i 


6 


1 
























2 


1 














6 






2 


2 
























1 


1 














17 




i 


11 


2 
























1 


2 















Maryland State Department of Education 175 



TABLE 65 — Number of Public Schools by Average Number of Pupils Belonging: 

State of Maryland: 1963-64 



Average 








City 


























>> 


rince George's 


09 
"» 








c 






Number 


M 

C 




a 
















a> 












£ 


a 


V. 






o 


o 




Belonging 


11 Scho 


llegan} 


nne Ai 


altimo: 


altimo 


alvert 


aroline 


arroll 


ecil 


harles 


'orches 


rederic 


arrett 


arford 


oward 


a 

o 


lontgoi 


a 

<u 
<u 
a 


S 


S 


J 


bfi 
C 


r ioomi( 


orcest 




< 


-< 


< 


m 


pq 


O 


O 


O 


a 


O 


O 




O 










CL, 


O" 


So 


<£ 








> 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (1-6) 



A II ^ihnnk 


873 


29 


62 


1 56 


93 


14 


9 


19 


19 


12 


21 


27 


17 


21 


15 


1 ] 


10f j 


117 


in 


1 6 


15 


22 


38 


21 


13 


•JO 1 


15 


i 


















g 




2 
















2 


j 






2 


31-60 


28 




I 


5 




3 












2 


3 


■ j 




3 




2 




2 


3 




2 




2 


61-90 


36 


2 


2 


3 


I 












5 


2 






3 


2 




3 


2 


2 


2 


j 


3 


3 


2 


91-120 


28 


1 






2 








2 




1 


3 


2 






2 


2 






1 


1 




5 


3 


2 


121-150 


31 




5 




1 




'2 








1 


1 


3 








3 


3 




1 


3 


3 


3 


2 




151-180 


26 


'2 


3 




1 


i 


1 




i 




1 


1 


2 






i 


2 


1 


*2 


1 




2 


2 






181-210 


32 


3 


1 


i 




4 


1 




1 


'3 


1 


1 










3 


3 




2 


i 


1 


2 






211-240 


30 


7 


1 


3 


3 








1 


1 




2 


i 










7 






1 




2 






241-270 


29 




3 


5 


4 


'3 






1 




i 


1 


1 








2 


1 




1 


1 




1 




i 


271-300 


38 


*2 


5 


2 


1 








2 






2 










7 


10 


i 


3 












301-330 


34 


2 


2 


3 


2 










'2 










i 




8 


4 


1 


1 


i 




3 






331-360 


43 


3 


3 


6 


2 








'2 


1 




i 


i 




1 




6 


6 


1 




1 




2 






361-390 


30 




3 


6 


2 














2 






2 




6 


5 










1 




i 


391-420 


37 




2 


5 


3 








'2 


1 




2 


'2 




2 




8 


4 










2 




1 


421-450 


42 




2 


1 


3 








1 


1 








5 


1 




5 


9 




i 






3 




1 


451-480 


47 


'2 


2 


8 


2 








1 










2 






5 


8 




1 






4 




1 


481-510 


35 


1 


3 


7 


3 








3 
















8 


6 




1 






1 




2 


511-540 


31 


2 


1 


3 


7 


















i 






10 


5 
















541-570 


32 




3 


6 


3 








1 












i 




5 


7 




i 












571-600 


25 




3 


4 


5 
























2 


7 
















601-660 


41 






14 


6 


















'2 


i 




6 


7 
















661-720 


35 




4 


7 


8 


















1 


2 




5 


6 
















721-780 


41 




6 


10 


13 
























7 


5 
















781-840 


29 




2 


11 


6 


















i 






3 


5 
















841-900 


30 






12 


10 


















3 






1 


2 
















901-960 


13 






9 


2 










































961-1020 


11 






9 












































1021-1080 


7 






5 


i 










































1081-1140 


5 






2 


1 
























i 


















1141-1200 


5 






3 


1 


















i 
























1201 and over 


7 






6 













































JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS (7-12) 





300 


11 


16 


51 


34 


4 


8 


11 


7 


8 


7 


9 


4 


8 


7 


4 


32 


37 


4 


6 


7 


3 


12 


6 


4 




2 




















1 




















1 










51-100 


11 






2 






"2 






"2 


1 




"2 


























101-150 


9 












1 






1 
































151-200 


8 






'2 






2 






1 
































201-250 


15 




i 


2 












































251-300 


4 






3 












































301-350 


7 






2 






























i 


1 












351-400 


10 




"2 


3 






























1 














401-450 


10 






































*2 










1 


451-500 


8 


















i 


















i 


1 






i 




1 


501-600 


15 






1 










i 
















i 




1 


1 






3 






601-700 


19 






2 




i 






2 












i 




1 






1 






1 






701-800 


21 






1 


'3 


1 






1 


i 










1 




2 


2 










2 






801-900 


19 




i 


1 


1 








2 


1 
















8 










1 






901-1000 


16 






2 


2 
























"4 


4 
















1001-1100 


14 






1 


4 










' 1 














2 


2 
















1101-1200 


14 




i 


1 


1 
























3 


















1201-1300 


19 




2 


1 


6 
























6 


















1301-1400 


9 






2 


4 
























1 


















1401-1500 


6 






1 


2 
























2 


















1501-1600 


4 






1 


2 
























1 


















1601-1700 


10 




'4 


1 


1 
























2 


















1701-1800 


8 




1 


1 


3 
























1 


















1S01-1900 


4 




1 


1 












































1901-2000 


3 




1 


1 


























1 


















2001-2100 


11 




1 


4 


3 
























2 


















2101-2200 


7 




1 


3 


1 
























1 


















2201-2300 


5 






3 












































2301-2400 


1 








i 










































2401-2500 


4 






'4 












































2501 and over 


7 






5 


























i 



















176 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



t> O O OJ 

m oo o 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



o — »o — — 



CO • lH 



. OC Ci — CM — 30 1^- 



note 
t cm co 



~. ie ~ — 10 n o 10 m - 



CM — — — « 



— i - zr -i — c "-^ c :: :c 



s C] CO — 

/ I I - 71 

CO CM C2 



W 33 I 
CO CM . 



CM Tf _ tJ< O 



— lo i .o i - r - s s ~ ■ 



; od od cm" 

I CM CM CO 



;ifl«5 cs co 

^ct" CO CO CO CO 



-T — >0 T CO 



CM 00 O 00 
t~ 0C — i — ( a 
CM O CM —i 



— CO — t ~ CO II-C^- i~ S — 

co * i ro x c x n io i - t — r ; 

CM CM — — i CO CO *-i <3i OS i 



~ »r cm 



CM C5 00 i-J CS ' 

r^. ic oo cd cm • 
CO N(N ret* CM cm cm cm ■ 



co oo cm 



reiqN' 
ci cm' . 

CO CO C 



j — y. 



CM — ~ CO NXCWO 
oc — — c: — I 1^ C c: ifl CD 



2 o 

3J & 



00 O iO CO ( 



(2 T 3 — 

c« S_=3 O £ c« o 5 



.!§-*. i= s.gg 



178 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 





Than 

ears 

ege 


Per 
Cent 


os 
o 


CO UO CO • 
OOCM — - 


• C; • • 




— - cm • r-. . 
O O ' O " 


. p • • 






Num- 
ber 


CM 
CO 


I>- CO • 


■ >o CO • • 




CO CO ■ -H ■ 




CM 


CO 

«- „ 

n t£ 


Per 
Cent 


•o 

CO 


p r~ oo_ os co 

— CM* OO — CM 


cc -h iq ~r cm 

— CO ~ CM »C 


SHOHH 

— — 16 


-r iq — r ~ © 
© •-" .H © — 


CM p p iq 
CM* CO O CO* 


GH (7-1 




Num- 
ber 


00 
CO 


r— r— ic co cm 

CM OC -qi 
CM 


CM CO CO 


COrtHH, OS"* 


00 CM ^ ^ ^ 


CM CC CM 00 


5TAL Hi 


elor's 

;ree 


Per 
Cent 


G3.5 


64.4 
75.9 
45.2 
66.7 
72.4 


77.7 
69.3 
75.7 
78.9 
68.1 


c x q c io 

cm' oo' r-' — os 


56.0 
75.3 
79.1 
82.4 
81.8 


66.3 
64.3 
74.5 
75.4 


EH 


"T ° 

03 


Num- 
ber 


8,932 


241 
750 
1,460 
1,516 
63 


1 - CO CO — CM 
O0 OO lO CO OS 


OS -3- 00 CM 

-*t co os m co 

CM CM — 


1,125 
1,444 

72 
117 

81 


OS — < CM CM 
iC CO t - OS 
CM «-i 




ter's 
e and 
alent* 


Per 
Cent 


32.1 


•»/3>t-.cn 
co o co o >o 

CO CM ht CO CM 


20.5 
22.7 
21.4 
18.7 
26.7 


25.7 
30.1 
22.0 
24.9 
15.4 


>jq p CO CM CM_ 
CO CO OS CO 
Tj. CM — i i-H — 


31.5 
30.8 
24.6 
18.1 




Mas 
Degre 
Equiv 


Num- 
ber 


4,514 


125 
207 
1,411 
681 
22 


CO O f — CO 

CM CO CO CO 


CO CO lO »0 CM 
OC CM 00 iC — 


■*> CM OO CO 
r» ■* — CM — 
CO 


CC ION CM 
CM CM »0 CM 




Less Than 
2 Years 
College 


Per 
Cent 


CO 


0.7 
11.4 
4.6 
2.7 


• CM U5 CM lO 

' t~" CO r-i 


io cq cm cq cq 

CM CM CO CM 


0.9 
2.3 

10.9 
1.1 


r- r- t_ r ~ 

CM CS O — 




Num- 
ber 


"o 


CM CO CO CO ■ 


• CO O CO CM 


OS i-m OS t-» CM 


CO OS • i-H 


CM CO — CM 


(1-6) 


2-3 Years 
College 


Per 
Cent 


CO 


13.3 
24.7 
20.6 
13.4 
11.6 


5.7 
32.8 
29.5 
14.3 
27.1 


p O OS IO p 

CM OS CO © © 
CM — CM CM CM 


3.9 
12.2 
24.1 
22.4 

8.7 


21.0 
19.8 
10.9 
17.2 


5 NTARY 


Num- 
ber 


2,385 


© OS O — i "* 

CM 1^ CO 


OC CO CM CO 


ccicioi» 


— IO — "0 00 

00 IO CM CO 
CM 


CM 00 CM CM 


S 

a 

W 
j 


elor's 
;ree 


Per 
Cent 


61.6 


71.1 

54.3 
45.2 
67.2 
77.7 


85.9 
48.0 
53.1 
73.5 
60.5 


CO © p »q — « 

2 S ccs § cB 


— hj. CO p t - 

r^- co I s * © co" 

CO CO CC OC 


— CO — 
l-H CO I - cm" 
COCONN 


■< 

Eh 
O 

EH 


*S • 
pq 


Num- 
ber 


9,126 


•<r co oo oo 

- X K C O! 
CM CO U5C 


— ~ ~ s 

OS CM — CO I - 


TJ< 00 00 I - 
CM CO CO — LO, 
CM CM — 


1,388 
1,537 
59 
95 
77 


CO — CM CO 
IO CO OS oo 
CM -h 




-at, 

OS S - 


Per 

Cent 


18.9 


Tfoiacdd 


h/occsi 

co cm cm os o 


CM O CO -«r p 

co cd os ui o 


OC CM CO 1C CO 
CM — 


00 TP p p 
lOCCCOS 




Mas 
Degre 
Equiv 


Num- 
ber 


2,795 


T — O S — 1 


CO CM — — 


00 CO OS O OS 

-r — co co 


CO T OS CO 
OC "0 
>« CM 


rH CD CM i-H 




rhan 

3ars 
ege 


Per 
Cent 


CM 


C CO CO CM ' 


■lOONOO 
' HT CO l-l © 


CO "5 l-H t-~ CM 

— ' © — i-' I iH 


iq co ■ p iq 
o«H " cc cs 


rH OS CM 00 
— C: O O 






Num- 
ber 


CO 

CO 


CO CO — "5 • 

co co os • 

— CM 


• CO CO CO CM 

• CM -h 


OS — OS t— CM 


— ' CM • CO 
CM • — 


CM N r-, CM 




2-3 Years 
College 


Per 
Cent 


10.0 


7.0 
14.6 
14.9 
7.8 
7.7 


3.7 
19.1 
16.0 

8.7 
15.9 


CM OS 00 p 
CM © cm' — ' cm' 


2.2 
7.1 
12 4 
12.1 
4.7 


11.9 
11.9 
6 1 
11.9 


rOTAL 


Num- 
ber 


2,873 


co m -f co 

Tj. — CO CD — 

CO OS CO 


x /. - - ?l 

OS CO CO 


CO O CO OS i-H 
CC CM © T CM 


OS -^f CM CO OS 
CC OO CM CO 
CM 


CM 00 OS OS 
CM OS CM CM 


P 
Z 
■< 

s 

O 


_0 o 


Per 
Cent 


62.5 


1^ -r >0 t - lC 

CO CO -J" CO I ■» 


81.6 
58.9 
64.0 
76.1 
64.4 


67.3 
66.3 
70.6 
66.1 
73.0 


61.6 

74.3 
73.6 
71.2 
82.7 


63.6 
63.7 
76.1 
73.8 




8 a 
-F w 
«Q 
ca 


Num- 
ber 


18,058 


455 
1,386 
2,998 
3,124 

157 


CO CO "0 o O 
t- O t~" r ~ t- 
— CO CM CM — 


CO 00 CO IO OS 


2,513 
2,981 
131 
212 
158 


— CM CO OO 

— UO CO i-i 




ter's 
e and 
alent* 


Per 
Cent 


25.3 


25.2 
14.8 
36.4 
23 .2 
16.8 


■J-'l-l^ CO 00 


19.2 
22.8 
15.4 
20^4 
12.9 


35.7 
17.3 
14.0 
107 
12.1 


■t iq p >q 

CO CO CO 
CM CM I—" t— < 




Mas 
Degrc 
Equiv 


Num- 
ber 


7,309 


170 
319 
2 415 
1 ',08 1 
35 


CM O CO 30 O 

« cs t» "> 


CO hh/i T "1 — 
CO "9" CM OC CM 


CO ifl> CM CO 
»0 OS CM CO CM 
^J. CO 


CO CO ht CO 
CS OO CO 


Local Unit 


Total State 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel. 
Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 


Carroll 

Cecil 

Dorchester. . . . 


Harford 


Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. 
St. Mary's 


Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Worcester 



IO CO !-- CO i-H i-H Tf CO CM i-H »-H i 



CO CM CM 00 CM —i OMN-HH 



: : : 



g.S S 3.2 5 



Maryland State Department of Education 179 





c 

"8 cv 1 


Per 
Cent 


p 


CO iq iq ■ 
O d CM — 


■qs> ■ • 

' CM — ° 




— CM • t— . 

do " d ' 






j.o 


Num- 
ber 


CM 

CO 


— 1/5 1/5 CM • 
t ~ CO ■ 


•IOM • • 










r ears 
lege 


Per 
Cent 


CO 
CO 


i-i CM' Oi CM* CM 


p -r p p p 

— d — CM -I" 


OO — — 1 CO CO 

— — ^; iti 


d — ' — d — ' 


cq — p 00 
cm' -r d d 


qh (7-1 : 


S3 

CM 


Num- 
ber 


CM 
OO 


1^ — CO CM 
CM OO ■"f 
CM 


cm co co -r »/5 




O0 OS —> — — 
CM 


CM CO CM CO 


JTAL III 


elor's 
;ree 


Per 

Cent 


65.6 


66.8 
78.1 
46.0 
68.9 
75.9 


83.6 
71.5 
79.7 
83.2 
73.4 


tp cm' d tj! — 
t-- r- t - oo 


1/5 CM CC 1/5 p 

od od cm' -r" co 

1.-5 I - S- X. S. 


67.5 
66.4 
75.8 
77.8 




Bach 
De( 


Num- 
ber 


8,859 


241 
748 
1,438 
1,514 

63 


r~ 00 ^ os — i 

00 r- 1/5 CM ~: 


-T T 1/5 00 CM 
-r CO OS ITS CO 
CM CM fl 


1,123 
1,428 

72 
114 

80 


CO — CD — 
1/5 CD CD OS 
CM — 




ter's 
e ami 
alent* 


Per 
Cent 


29.8 


31.0 

18.6 
42.6 
27.6 
21.7 


14.5 
20.1 
17.1 
14.2 
22.6 


23.3 
26.2 
19.8 
21.2 
13.1 


41.0 
20.0 
16.1 
14.1 
12.0 


30.2 
28.5 
23.3 
15.4 




Mas 
Degre 
E<iuiv 


Num- 
ber 


4,026 


112 

178 
1,330 
608 
18 


1/5 CD CO CM OO 
— "5 CO CM CM 


CD CO -T 1/5 O 

cm t- -r ■— > 


i - CD -r os — 

fl CD 1 

r— co 


CO CM — 00 
CM — 1/5 — 










0.7 
12.2 
4.9 
2.8 


■ 00 p CO 

■ -CP CO — 


CM tH CM" CO CM 


0.9 
2.5 

11.4 
1.2 


-J« 00 1/5 OO 
CNOO-i 




Tha 
ears 
lege 




CO 








oj cm^-J 
i— ! 


Num- 
ber 


OS 

g 


CM CM CD CO • 
CO ••'5 CO • 


■ OO CD CO CM 


OS — OS 1^- CM 


oo os • co — i 


CM CO »— « CM 


(9-1) 


f*ears 
lege 


Per 
Cent 


17.0 


14.5 
25.7 
21.8 
14.4 
12.7 


6.1 
34.6 
31.5 
15.1 
29.0 


24.0 
20.5 
24.9 
21.7 
20.0 


4.0 
12.8 
25.6 
24.3 

8.4 


24.1 
21.3 
11.7 
18.0 


BNTARY 


CM 


Num- 
ber 


2,353 


OWCOCSf 
-*f 1^ O — — I 
CM CO CO 


co o io t 

00 CD CM CO 


O 00 OS OS 1/5 
OC — OS CO fH 


t>» 1/5 CM CO 


o cm o 

CM 00 CM CM 


S 

a 
j 

j 


Bachelor's 
Degree 


Per 
Cent 


64.4 


r- p p -r r - 

CO CD — CO 
t- lO -r t- OO 


90.8 
47.2 
56.3 
76.0 
60.7 


oqqiqfflN 

l/SNCOMO 
OCSOON 


71.1 

76.0 
70.5 
62.2 
88.0 


65.1 
66.7 
80.0 
76.6 


< 


Num- 
ber 


8,894 


207 
606 
1,493 
1,584 
92 


OS OS CD CD — • 
00 O CO t- 


os os -r i/5 co 

— 1/5 CO — 1/5 
CM CM — 


1,386 
1,501 
55 
87 
73 


^C* CO -T lO 
1/5 1/5 00 OO 
CM 




"Ota 

o a c 
III 


Per 
Cent 


o> 


10.1 
6.1 
26.4 
11.4 

3.6 


3.1 
10.4 
7.3 
5.6 
8.6 


i/5 -r< cq iq r~ 


24.0 
8.7 
3.9 
2.1 
2.4 


8.4 
11.2 
7.8 
3.6 




1 &l 


Num- 
ber 


CO 
1/5 

p 
cm" 


OO CO — CM -t> 
CM CO T O 
OO CM 




1/5 O 1/5 OS 1/5 
CM *— « CM •— ' 


00 — « CO CO CM 
CD t— 


co oo -r 




Than 

ears 

lege 


Per 
Cent 


CO 
CM 


O CD CO CM " 


• 00 CO 00 00 

■ co — d 


-r co cm oo co 
d — — ■' — 


1/5 -T 1 • CM CO 

d — 'do 


CM OS CM OS 

— odd 






Num- 
ber 


CD 


co r i 1/5 • 

co co ccs • 

— CM 


• CO CO CD CM 

• CM — 


OS — . OS CM 


— « CM • t-- — 
CM 1/5 • — 


CM — CM 




fears 
lege 


Per 
Cent 


10.4 


7.4 
14.9 
15.5 

8.2 
8.3 


O O O CO CM 
TTONCid 
CM — — 


p oq -r cm p 
co d co cm cm 


2.3 
7.4 
12.7 
12.7 
4.6 


O p 1/5 CO 
CO CM d CM 


ToTAL 


CM 


Num- 
ber 


2,835 


CO OS CO 


OO CD OO — OS 
OS CD CO CO 


CD OS CO 00 OS 

oc — O -r — 


f~~- CO — 1/5 00 

00 OO CM CO 
CM 


CM OC OS 00 
CM OS CM CM 


a 
z 

1 


elor's 
;ree 


Per 
Cent 


65.0 


CM -r iq CM CO 

d co co d o 

1- co -r i- oo 


87.1 
59.8 
67.7 
79.3 
67.2 


CO p p CM 

odcicia 

CD I- CO t- 


64.8 
77.0 
77.0 
73.1 
87.4 


66.3 
66.5 
77.9 
77.2 




Bach 
Dec 


Num- 
ber 


17,753 


448 
1,354 
2,931 
3,098 

155 


CO t- O 1/5 CM 
i - at i - co cd 
— CM CM CM *- 


CO CO OS CO 1/5 

CO CM 1/5 t- 1 

T-iOCN- 


2,509 
2,929 
127 
201 
153 


— 1/5 CO — 




"Ota 

i> "cl 


Per 
Cent 


22.3 


p p CO 1/5 *V 

— cm -r d — 

CM — CO — — 


p -r p p oq 

OC* 1/5 CM d 1/5 


15.3 
18.7 
12.8 
16.3 
9.9 


•<r cm co p -r 
cm" -r" d oo t- 
CO — — 


19.5 
20.0 
15.4 
9.6 






Num- 
ber 


CM 
OO 

o 

C©" 


140 
244 
2 171 

860 
22 


cc -r oo cm oo 
— r— -r co co 


— CO OS T «/5 
O CO OS CO — 


KJNr-tNCJ 
«/5 CO — CM — 
CM lO 


CO 1/5 OS CM 
CO 1/5 CO CM 


Local Unit 


Total State 


a g.j.j § 

= = rJ 33 rj 


Caroline 

Carroll 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 


Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Kent. . . 


Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. 
St. Mary's. . . . 


III 

mi 



O CM CM — — 



— u-5 — CO 



J 00 - O C L5 



Elf 

c tv-' = q s3 n 



CO CM CM — — 



esc ■ E fl 1 
= = = § 



180 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 





ears 
lege 


Per 
Cent 




cm i-h co cm' ' 


•coco • • 

' «5CM ' " 




■ CM 
' O 


' CM 






EH** 1 o 
H<mO 




CO 


HCOWO 












(TO 






OS 

cm 


• CM tt l>. OS 
CM OO rH CO 


C3 IO • • ■ 


O • • O0 CM 
CM ' ' CO CO 






co -oqq 
«d ' — ' co 


GH (7-1 


_ O 


3 s 




■ CO — 00 CM 


CO CO 


i-H • • CM t 




■ CM • 




M 


jaa 


eg S 


p 

CO 


N q O (N M 
c i d d r t d 
OS 00 r~- oc 00 


CM TP p -T TJH 

00 C2 cc 


p co p co 

CM CO t-» OC — r 
t^- GO 0O 00 


tp — CO O 

co' cr: ~ d 
t- x o o> c 


CM p p p 

-p d 10 — 

OC OC 00 C2 




J2 M 

PQ 


ii 


00 

C2 
CM 


00 co 00 m 

CO CO OC OS CM 
CM CO CO 


CM CO co 02 

CO TP Tp CO TH 


CO CO 1— 1 t-i CO 
CO *-H t>- TP t— 1 


coco 

CM -CP 


CjONO 






(Sri 


I>- 

cm' 


OINTTOO 
TP CO CM CO CO 


p 00 oo_ p p 

t^- GO CO CM CO 


CO CO oj cm' 


p CM 

r- 

(M 


' CM 


p t- r - 

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181 





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76.7 
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76.6 
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77.8 
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182 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



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Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



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198 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 88 — Withdrawals: Teachers and Principals: By Organization: 
Maryland Public Schools: Summer, 1963 and School Year, 1963-64 



Local Unit 


Total 


Elementary (1-6) 


High (7-12) 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total State 


*4,521 


15.7 


2,402 


16.2 


2,119 


15.1 


Allegany 


56 


8.3 


27 


9.0 


29 


7.7 


Anne Arundel 


470 


21.8 


253 


21.6 


217 


21.9 


Baltimore City 


866 


13.1 


429 


12.6 


437 


13.5 




710 


15.2 


388 


16.2 


322 


14.2 


Calvert 


53 


25.5 


32 


26.4 


21 


24.1 




54 


24.8 


18 


17.0 


36 


32.1 


Carroll 


74 


14.4 


28 


11.2 


46 


17.4 


Cecil 


92 


21.4 


52 


23.2 


40 


19.4 


Charles 


59 


16.6 


33 


17.5 


26 


15.7 


Dorchester 


30 


11.4 


13 


10.1 


17 


12.6 


Frederick 


156 


22.1 


97 


26.6 


59 


17.2 




20 


10.4 


8 


8.0 


12 


12.9 




121 


15.1 


63 


15.2 


58 


15.0 




78 


18.7 


42 


21.5 


36 


16.3 


Kent 


31 


19.0 


17 


20.0 


14 


17.9 




657 


16.1 


376 


18.2 


281 


14.0 


Prince George's 


806 


20.1 


444 


21.2 


362 


18.9 




30 


16.9 


10 


11.5 


20 


22.0 


St. Mary's 


82 


27.5 


44 


28.2 


38 


26.8 




23 


12.0 


15 


16.3 


8 


8.1 


Talbot 


28 


15.2 


14 


14.7 


14 


15.7 


Washington 


97 


11.8 


42 


10.1 


55 


13.5 




76 


15.9 


32 


12.9 


44 


19.0 




41 


16.8 


14 


11.5 


27 


22.1 



* Transfers between units are included in individual unit totals but excluded from State totals as follows: 
total, 189; elementary, 89; high, 100. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



199 



TABLE 89 — Withdrawals: Elementary and High School Teachers and 
Principals (1-12): Maryland Public Schools: Summer, 1963, and School Year, 

1963-64 



Local Unit 


Total 


Summer, 1963 


School Year, 1963-64 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total State 


*4,521 


15.7 


3,449 


12.0 


1,072 


3.7 




56 


8.3 


44 


6.5 


12 


1.8 




470 


21.8 


356 


16.5 


114 


5.3 


Baltimore City 


866 


13.1 


592 


8.9 


274 


4.2 




710 


15.2 


564 


12.1 


146 


3.1 


Calvert 


53 


25.5 


39 


18.8 


14 


6.7 


Caroline 


54 


24.8 


47 


21.6 


7 


3.2 


Carroll 


74 


14.4 


59 


11.5 


15 


2.9 


Cecil 


92 


21.4 


72 


16.7 


20 


4.7 




59 


16.6 


47 


13.2 


12 


3.4 




30 


11.4 


28 


10.6 


2 


0.8 


Frederick 


156 


22.1 


134 


19.0 


22 


3.1 




20 


10.4 


17 


8.8 


3 


1.6 


Harford 


121 


15.1 


106 


13.2 


15 


1.9 


Howard 


78 


18.7 


67 


16.1 


11 


2.6 


Kent 


31 


19.0 


25 


15.3 


6 


3.7 


Montgomery 


657 


16.1 


538 


13.2 


119 


2.9 




806 


20.1 


609 


15.2 


197 


4.9 




30 


16.9 


28 


15.8 


2 


1.1 




82 


27.5 


54 


18.1 


28 


9.4 


Somerset 


23 


12.0 


20 


10.5 


3 


1.5 


Talbot 


28 


15.2 


22 


11.9 


6 


3.3 




97 


11.8 


72 


8.8 




3.0 




76 


15.9 


57 


11.9 


19 


4.0 


Worcester 


41 


16.8 


37 


15.2 


4 


1.6 



* Transfers between units are included in individual unit totals but excluded from State total as follows: 
Total, 189; summer, 185; school year, 4. 



200 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



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202 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 92— State Aid for Minimum Program* : Maryland Public Day 
Schools— Grades 1-12: 1963-64 



Local Unit 


Cost of Minimum Program 


State Aid for 
Minimum Program 


Totalt 


^^inimum 
Salaries 


Other 
Current 
Expense 

Cost 


Trans- 
portation 


Amountt 


Per Cent 


Total State 


$172,094,513 


$127,784,764 


$31,946,192 


$12,247,250 


$82,838,627 


48.1 


Allegany 


4,732,778 


3,440,256 


860,063 


419,961 


2,948,787 


62.3 


Anne Arundel . . 


12,439,928 


9,029,758 


2,257,440 


1,152,176 


7,410,082 


59.6 


Baltimore City . 


39,128,593 


30,990,509 


7,747,628 


390,456 


15,292,041 


39.1 


Baltimore 


25,165,244 


18,793,385 


4,698,346 


1,673,175 


8,390,946 


33.3 


Calvert 


1,519,051 


966,520 


241,631 


310,900 


1,204,701 


79.3 


Caroline 


1,545,565 


1,026,258 


256,565 


259,758 


1,184,475 


76.6 


Carroll 


3,397,437 


2,362,354 


590,588 


437,504 


1,955,491 


57.5 


Cecil 


2,950,280 


2,070,583 


517,646 


362,051 


1,960,847 


66.5 




2,549,894 


1,720,273 


430,068 


398,000 


1,862,518 


73.0 


Dorchester 


1,989,815 


1,333,000 


333,250 


323,565 


1,317,169 


66.2 




4,442,882 


3,186,222 


796,555 


459,597 


2,363,741 


53.2 




1,658,014 


1,022,858 


255,714 


370,316 


1,271,950 


76.7 




5,379,155 


3,636,064 


909,016 


833,608 


3,319,631 


61.7 


Howard 


2,724,458 


1,884,615 


471,154 


368,089 


1,298,044 


47.6 


Kent 


1,083,010 


736,264 


184,066 


158,393 


606,286 


56.0 


Montgomery . . . 


22,878,606 


17,377,184 


4,344,297 


1,143,105 


8,579,003 


37.5 


Prince George's. 


21,795,019 


16,606,656 


4,151,664 


1,030,353 


11,824,006 


54.3 


Queen Anne's. . 


1,272,367 


834,750 


208,688 


227,365 


799,805 


62.9 




1,965,862 


1,319,585 


329,896 


313,596 


1,434,990 


73.0 


Somerset 


1,431,919 


965,838 


241,459 


224,440 


1,155,385 


80.7 


Talbot 


1,297,003 


895,647 


223,912 


177,221 


661,753 


51.0 


Washington .... 


5,709,381 


4,188,221 


1,047,054 


473,678 


3,191,558 


55.9 


Wicomico 


3,277,239 


2,242,530 


560,632 


426,283 


1,901,623 


58.0 




1,761,013 


1,155,434 


288,860 


313,660 


903,795 


51.3 



* The minimum program in calculating State Equalization aid includes the following: 

(a) Total minimum salaries of the allowed number of teachers and principals as determined by State law; 

(b) other current expense including the cost of operation and maintenance and the cost of instruction 
other than the salaries of teachers, principals, and supervisors; and 

(c) the cost of approved transportation to public schools. 

t Tuition applicable to Bylaw 11 included in these columns only. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



203 



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213 



TABLE 101 — Average Annual Salary per Teacher and Principal: 
Public Schools of Maryland: 1922-23—1963-64 



Year 



Average Annual Salary per Teacher and Principal 





Total 


Elementary 


High 


1922-23 


$1,243 


$1,156 


$1,671 


1927-28 


1,408 


1,320 


1,830 


1932-33 


1,453 


1,398 


1,659 


1937-38 


1,556 


1,487 


1,784 


1942-43 


1,775 


1,648 


1,994 


1954-55 


4,163 


4,104 


4,237 


1955-56 


4,465 


4,450 


4,482 


1956-57 


4,719 


4,684 


4,760 


1957-58 


4,944 


4,821 


5,092 


1958-59 


5,247 


5,079 


5,447 


1959-60 


5,493 


5,436 


5,556 


1960-61 


5,852 


5,715 


5,999 


1961-62 


6,009 


6,019 


6,184 


1962-63 


6,239 


6,147 


6,334 


1963-64 


6,416 


6,243 


6,605 



214 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



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216 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 104— Expenditures of Public Funds for Transportation of Public 
School Pupils: Counties of Maryland* 1954-55—1963-64: State of Maryland 

1963-64 



Year 














Cost per 


Number 




Local Unit 


Amount 


Pupil 


Transported 


Per Cent 




COUNTIES OF 


MARYLAND, 1955-64 




1954-55 


$5,528,488 


$31.79 


173,889 


55.5 


1955-56 


6,039,827 


32.91 


183,552 


55.5 


1956-57 


6,802,444 


35.41 


192,126 


55.5 


1957-58 


7,497,938 


37.12 


201,969 


55.4 


1958-59 


8,238,252 


38.24 


215,414 


55.8 


1959-60 


8,789,916 


38.47 


228,495 


56.1 


1960-61 


9,793,092 


41.68 


234,933 


54.9 


1961-62 


10,492,037 


41.55 


252,538 


55.0 


1962-63 


11,482,471 


43.02 


266,902 


54.7 


1963-64 


12,183,375 


43.05 


282,987 


54.4 



BY LOCAL UNIT, 1963-64 



Total State 


$12,607,666 


* 


287,697 


* 


Allegany 


455,030 


$53.72 


8,470 


50.4 


Anne Arundel 


1,181,955 


39.21 


30,142 


58.8 




424,291 




4,710 


* 


Baltimore 


1,695,126 


36.41 


46,558 


45.7 


Calvert 


318,244 


66.96 


4,753 


95.5 


Caroline 


261,482 


68.15 


3,837 


81.0 


Carroll 


438,060 


45.25 


9,681 


80.8 


Cecil 


367,995 


48.08 


7,654 


72.5 


Charles 


404,852 


51.90 


7,801 


91.1 




324,154 


88.25 


3,673 


57.0 




420,810 


42.49 


9,904 


62.7 




334,943 


74.30 


4,508 


90.7 


Harford 


861,266 


56.92 


15,131 


77.5 


Howard 


389,489 


44.73 


8,708 


89.0 


Kent 


159,116 


64.58 


2,464 


71.3 


Montgomery 


1,337,386 


32.98 


40,554 


41.5 


Queen Anne's 


1,044,837 


25.77 


40,536 


43.9 


232,787 


65.83 


3,536 


87.4 


St. Mary's 


317,878 


48.78 


6,517 


88.4 


Somerset 


227,027 


76.34 


2,974 


66.9 


Talbot 


178,461 


69.04 


2,585 


58.1 


Washington 


484,380 


41.21 


11,755 


55.6 


Wicomico 


429,889 


64.00 


6,717 


58.8 




318,208 


70.26 


4,529 


75.5 > 



* Cost per pupil and per cent transported for Baltimore City are not shown because Baltimore City with 
26.2 per cent of total State enrollment transports only 1.1 per cent of its pupils. 
Note: Enrollment figures used are those of October 31, 1963. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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219 



TABLE 107 — Participation and Reimbursement Paid: Special Milk Program: 
Maryland Public Schools: 1955-56—1963-64 



Year 
Local Unit 


Number of 
Approved 
Schools 
Participating 
in Program 


Per Cent of 
Toftal Schools 

in State 
Participating 

in Program 


Total Number 
of One-half 
Pints Milk 

Reimbursable 


Reimburse- 
ment 
Paid 


1955 56 


772 


82.2 


21,833,604 


$820,471 


1956-57 


818 


85.6 


26,390,908 


983,689 


1957-58 


874 


89.5 


28,715,326 


1,080,048 


1958-59 


914 


92.7 


36,390,152 


1,286,797 


1959-60 


943 


94.2 


35,555,378 


1,354,115 


1960-61 


960 


93.5 


37,398,754 


1,436,752 


1961-62 


978 


93.9 


42,251,724 


1,590,134 


1962-63 


1,014 


95.1 


45,931,042 


1,724,716 


1963-64 


1,049 


95.7 


47,566,203 


1,747,628 



BY LOCAL* UNIT, 1963-64 



Allegany 


32 


94.1 


1,130,405 


$44,597 


Anne Arundel 


76 


100.0 


4,621,116 


181,390 


Baltimore City 


190 


100.0 


9,720,048 


296,615 




126 


100.0 


8,411,758 


329,904 


Calvert 


15 


93.7 


302,025 


11,595 




11 


100.0 


198,904 


6,367 


Carroll 


25 


100.0 


545,829 


21,545 


Cecil 


22 


88.0 


540,490 


17,899 


Charles 


14 


93.3 


686,258 


25,348 


Dorchester 


20 


76.9 


278,809 


10,715 


Frederick 


33 


100.0 


685,889 


26,753 




18 


94.7 


286,706 


10,927 


Harford 


27 


100.0 


1,280,826 


42,698 


Howard 


20 


100.0 


1,073,857 


39,256 


Kent 


13 


100.0 


192,792 


7,498 




125 


92.6 


6,869,563 


269,611 




151 


98.1 


7,859,017 


293,909 




13 


92.9 


214,212 


8,208 




18 


94.7 


438,698 


16,350 




11 


61.1 


115,697 


4,048 


Talbot 


11 


78.6 


201,903 


7,850 


Washington 


45 


97.8 


983,679 


38,709 




23 


100.0 


649,469 


24,956 




10 


58.8 


278,253 


10,880 



220 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



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111! 



Maryland State Department of Education 



221 



TABLE 109 — Participation in and Types of Lunches Served: National School 
Lunch Program: Maryland Public Schools: 1963-64 





in u 1 1 J uei ui 


Ppr Cpnt nf 

X CI VycrilL Ul 




Per Cent of 


Total 




A nnrovpH 


Total Sr»hnn1<i 


A V CI 


Total Average 


Miimhpr of 

IX UIII UCI UI 


T.r*r*AT TTmtt 


Vi c\c\\ c 


in Stafo 

ill OlOlC 


Daily 


NumbGr Be~ 


Tvnp A* 

i ype a 




Participating 


Participating 


Participation 


longinginState 


Lunches 




in Program 


in Program 




Participating 


Served 










in Program 




Total State 


901 


82.2 


233,128 


34.7 


38,634,614 


Allegany 


32 


94.1 


11,147 


66.7 


1,854,303 


Anne Arundel 


76 


100.0 


15,222 


29.9 


2,510,209 


Baltimore City 


100 


52.6 


21,542 


12.9 


3,625,386 


Baltimore 


120 


95.2 


39,010 


38.5 


6,458,838 


Calvert 


11 


68.7 


1,593 


32.6 


262,355 


Caroline 


9 


81.8 


2,489 


53.6 


413,865 


Carroll 


25 


100.0 


6,541 


54.7 


1,080,565 


Cecil 


22 


88.0 


4,228 


40.5 


694,300 


Charles 


11 


73.3 


1,973 


23.3 


318,653 


Dorchester 


19 


73.1 


2,374 


37.1 


390,215 


Frederick 


33 


100.0 


9,878 


63.0 


1,624,825 


Garrett 


14 


73.7 


3,305 


66.8 


555,745 


Harford 


27 


100.0 


10,811 


55.5 


1,778,600 




19 


95.0 


4,160 


42.5 


688,834 


Kent 


11 


84.6 


1,667 


48.8 


275,580 


Montgomery 


119 


88.1 


33,152 


37.4 


5,589,741 


Prince George's .... 


139 


90.3 


38,839 


43.0 


6,403,566 


Queen Anne's 


10 


71.4 


2,255 


56.4 


376,303 


St. Mary's 


13 


68.4 


2,626 


36.9 


407,551 


Somerset 


7 


38.9 


993 


22.6 


169,788 


Talbot 


11 


78.6 


1,696 


38.4 


284,680 


Washington 


44 


95.7 


11,488 


56.6 


1,849,958 


Wicomico 


20 


86,9 


3,948 


34.8 


655,611 


Worcester 


9 


52.9 


2,191 


37.8 


365,143 



* Type A — % pt. milk, 2 oz. protein, % c. vegetable and/or fruit, 1 serving bread, 2 tsps. butter or 
fortified margarine. 



222 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 110 — Capital Outlay Expenditures: Maryland Local Boards of 
Education: 1963-64 



Local Unit 


Total 


Expenditures for Capital Outlay 


Elementary 


High 


Administration 
Buildings 


Community 
Colleges 


Total State 


$86,781,942 


$33,808,988 


$47,639,956 


$1,395,926 


$3,937,072 


Allegany 


1,218,986 


4,073 


1,188,328 


12,619 


13,966 


Anne Arundel. . . 


8,851,657 


3,635,630 


4,926,672 


16,835 


272,520 


Baltimore City. . 


14,426,882 


7,283,653 


3,876,935 


906,603 


2,359,691 


Baltimore 


14,615,763 


4,572,689 


9,381,463 


119,843 


541,768 


Calvert 


361,054 


12,294 


347,405 


1,355 




Caroline 


194,551 


6,344 


188,207 






Carroll 


395,477 


222,290 


165,549 


7,638 




Cecil 


182,103 


25,154 


148,931 


8,018 






1,740,396 


386,574 


1,346,671 


3,788 


3,363 


Dorchester 


673,646 


39,662 


633,984 






Frederick 


1,435,996 


382,399 


1,048,007 




5,590 


Garrett 


121,366 




121,366 






Harford 


1,823,972 


874,843 


258,043 


1,032 


690,054 




1,346,808 


809,012 


534,403 


3,393 




Kent 


199,598 


16,009 


183,589 






Montgomery .... 


14,835,755 


4,643,639 


9,937,002 


229,523 


25,591 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's . . . 


21,554,295 


9,515,865 


11,954,229 


78,202 


5,999 


171,723 


16,907 


154,816 








327,889 


144,495 


183,394 






Somerset 


97,270 


55,697 


41,573 






Talbot 


455,159 


263,275 


191,884 






Washington 


419,396 


298,570 


101,721 


575 


18,530 


Wicomico 


1,100,975 


492,536 


604,460 


3,979 




Worcester 


231,225 


107,378 


121,324 


2,523 





Maryland State Department of Education 



223 



TABLE 111— Value* of Maryland Public School Property per Pupil 
Belonging: 1963-64 





Total 


Elementary 


High 


Local Unit 
















Total 


Average 


Total 


Average 


Total 


Average 




Value 


per Pupil 


Value 


per Pupil 


Value 


per Pupil 


Total State 


$908,599,131 


$1,340 


$426,577,449 


$1,131 


$482,021,682 


$1,619 


Allegany 


22,395,700 


1,340 


8,041,360 


995 


14,354,340 


1,662 


Anne Arundel. . 


61,339,800 


1,206 


28,596,350 


965 


32,743,450 


1,541 


Baltimore Cityf 


189,968,926 


1,085 


96,679,669 


917 


93,289,257 


1,340 


Baltimore 


161,757,291 


1,595 


72,921,845 


1,320 


88,835,446 


1,925 


Calvert 


4,965,600 


1,014 


2,384,178 


789 


2,581,422 


1,377 


Caroline 


7,475,604 


1,598 


2,605,326 


981 


4,870,278 


2,407 


Carroll 


12,607,485 


1,055 


5,486,146 


836 


7,121,339 


1,321 


Cecil 


17,344,000 


1,663 


7,649,000 


1,241 


9,695,000 


2,275 




9,846,357 


1,160 


4,385,020 


890 


5,461,337 


1,536 




8,660,800 


1,352 


3,392,100 


963 


5,268,700 


1,827 




21,538,230 


1,374 


10,635,980 


1,264 


10,902,250 


1,502 


Garrett 


5,857,000 


1,185 


3,247,000 


1,177 


2,610,000 


1,194 


Harford 


31,389,096 


1,612 


16,775,308 


1,521 


14,613,788 


1,732 


Howard 


8,963,600 


917 


4,228,200 


781 


4,735,400 


1,084 


Kent 


3,744,600 


1,096 


1,938,598 


984 


1,806,002 


1,247 


Montgomery. . . 


131,407,624 


1,409 


64,481,686 


1,230 


66,925,938 


1,639 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 


131,468,363 


1,439 


57,818,727 


1,104 


73,649,636 


1,890 


3,946,226 


987 


1,749,597 


763 


2,196,629 


1,288 




7,568,237 


1,058 


3,235,592 


747 


4,332,645 


1,534 


Somerset 


4,756,508 


1,081 


1,910,365 


778 


2,846,143 


1,464 


Talbot 


7,637,612 


1,731 


3,531,088 


1,405 


4,106,524 


2,163 


Washington. . . . 


26,381,945 


1,277 


13,298,954 


1,198 


13,082,991 


1,368 


Wicomico 


19,349,600 


1,705 


8,016,960 


1,217 


11,332,640 


2,378 


Worcester 


8,228,927 


1,402 


3,568,400 


1,065 


4,660,527 


1,848 



* Value based on 100 per cent of the insured valuation for each school building and the equipment 
thereof. Value of sites has been excluded. 

t Baltimore City shows value of buildings and equipment as carried by the Bureau of Accounts and 
Disbursements; this valuation does not constitute the basis for insurance. 



224 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 112 — Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness Related to Assessed 

Valuation: June 30, 1964 






School Bonded Indebtness as of 


1963 Assessed 


Assessed 


Per Cent 






June 30, 1964 




Valuation 


Valuation 


School 


Local Unit 








Taxable at 


per Dollar 


Bonded In- 










r ull Kate tor 


r (J ,,1, ,-, ,, 1 

oi ochool 


debtedness 






County 


State 


County 


rsonaea In- 


is of Assess- 




Total 


Bonds 


Loanf 


Purposes 


debtedness 


ed Valuation 


Total State 


$575,576,779 


$468,399,452 


$107,177,327 


$10,358,975,155 


$18 


5.5 


Allegany 


5,359,383 


1,516,000 


3,843,383 


209,982,564 


39 


2.5 


Anne Arundel .... 


45,960,069 


42,095,000 


3,865,069 


565,666,448 


12 


8.1 


Baltimore City . . . 


*118,736,000 


*118,736,000 


2,757,130,606 


23 


4.3 


Baltimore 


*119,294,744 


*90,836,000 


28,458,744 


1,928,405,096 


16 


6.2 


Calvert 


2,663,665 


2,036,000 


627,665 


36,980,725 


14 


7.2 


Caroline 


2,974,431 


2,460,000 


514,431 


41,674,075 


14 


7.1 


Carroll 


1,740,520 


100,000 


1 ,640,520 


165,566,191 


95 


1.1 


Cecil 


7,564,402 


5,170,000 


2,394,402 


116,849,085 


15 


6.5 


Charles 


4,322,470 


2,643,000 


1,679,470 


81,306,290 


19 


5.3 


Dorchester 


3,987,259 


3,683,300 


303,959 


76,326,700 


19 


5.2 


Frederick 


20,305,789 


16,990,000 


3,315,789 


240,745,268 


12 


8.4 


Garrett 


1,353,949 


775,000 


578,949 


45,063,825 


33 


3.0 


Harford 


17,082,290 


16,776,000 


306,290 


235,581,742 


14 


7.3 


Howard 


5,793,130 


2,967,000 


2,826,130 


159,045,765 


27 


3.6 


Kent 


1,030,722 


650,000 


380,722 


52,260,332 


51 


2.0 


Montgomery 


91,277,786 


63,719,152 


27,558,634 


1,703,396,155 


19 


5.3 


Prince George's. . . 


88,182,372 


66,780,000 


21,402,372 


1,173,013,975 


13 


7.5 


Queen Anne's .... 


1,254,526 


885,000 


369,526 


53,824,453 


43 


2.3 


St. Mary's 


3,301,061 


2,000,000 


1,301,061 


61,788,871 


19 


5.3 


Somerset 


1,959,716 


1,630,000 


329,716 


32,064,058 


16 


6.1 


Talbot 


2,362,713 


1,580,000 


782,713 


73,678,845 


31 


3.2 


Washington 


19,710,421 


16,635,000 


3,075,421 


287,664,346 


15 


6.9 


Wicomico 


7,643,262 


6,887,000 


756,262 


161,033,381 


21 


4.7 


Worcester 


1,716,099 


850,000 


866,099 


99,926,359 


58 


1.7 



* Includes following bonded indebtedness for community colleges: Baltimore City, $1,730,179; Baltimore, $700,000; 
Washington, $800,000; total, $3,230,179. 
t General School Construction Loan. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



225 



TABLE 113— Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness* and Interest 
Payments per Pupil Belonging — K-12: June 30, 1964 



Local Unit 



School 
Bonded 
Indebtedness 



Interest 
Payments 



Local Unit 



School 
Bonded 
Indebtedness 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 



$838.33 

320.70 
903.54 
678.39 
1,176.39 
543.88 

635.83 
145.61 
725.49 
509.45 
622.46 

1,295.71 



$24.19 

6.32 
26.74 
18.16 
35.52 
17.47 

20.23 
3.61 
20.09 
16.55 
17.63 

28.15 



Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's. . . . 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



273.87 


7.19 


877.34 


28.76 


592.41 


16.09 


301.62 


8.85 


978.83 


31.90 


965.44 


28.07 


313.87 


9.08 


461.49 


5.18 


445.32 


13.79 


535.63 


17.76 


953.85 


21.66 


673.32 


18.35 


292.33 


7.94 



* Includes General School Construction Loan. 



226 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 114 — Local Revenue Appropriations for Programs Operated by Local Boards 
of Education: State of Maryland: 1963-64 



Local Unit 


Local 
Revenue* 


Appropriations for Public ScHOOLst 


Per Cent of Total Revenue 
Appropriated for Public Schools 


All School 
Purposes 


Current 
Expenses 


Capital 
Outlay 


Debt 
Service 


All 

School 
Purposes 


Current 
Expenses 


Capital 
Outlay 


Debt 
Service 


Total State 


$447,119,596 


$217,435,907 


$177,836,542 


$7,830,093 


$31,769,272 


48.6 


39.7 


1.8 


7.1 


Allegany 


8,123,374 


3,974,049 


2,976,999 


712,931 


284,119 


48.9 


36.6 


8.8 


3.5 


Anne Arundel. . . . 


20,830,222 


10,691,965 


8,698,228 




1,993,737 


51.3 


41.7 




9.6 


Baltimore City 


163,050,010 


54,961,742 


49,026,016 


2,339,651 


3,596,075 


33.7 


30.1 


' i'.4 


2.2 


Baltimore 


66,638,186 


42,096,672 


33,269,677 


776,991 


8,050,004 


63.2 


49.9 


1.2 


12.1 


Calvert 


1,716,247 


854,917 


622,295 


47,000 


185,622 


49.8 


36.3 


2.7 


10.8 


Caroline 


1,882,663 


979,438 


650,000 


102,655 


226,783 


52.0 


34.5 


5.5 


12.0 


Carroll 


5,248,689 


2,805,636 


2,306,371 


228,765 


270,500 


53.4 


43.9 


4.3 


5.2 


Cecil 


4,880,432 


2,396,865 


1,790,756 


11,000 


595,109 


49.1 


36.7 


0.2 


12.2 


Charles 


2,990,267 


1,377,714 


1,039,331 


94,420 


243,963 


46.1 


34.7 


3.2 


8.2 


Dorchester 


3,042,881 


1,210,057 


994,098 




215,959 


39.8 


32.7 




7.1 


Frederick 


7,512,335 


4,425,279 


3,581,266 


35,027 


808,986 


58.9 


47.7 


0.5 


10.7 


Garrett 


2,207,523 


658,164 


465,472 


95,486 


97,206 


29.8 


21.1 


4.3 


4.4 




6,839,353 


3,863,345 


3,128,234 


15,000 


720,111 


56.4 


45.7 


0.2 


10.5 


Howard 


4,529,161 


2,472,809 


2,053,153 


101,772 


317,884 


54.6 


45.4 


2.2 


7.0 


Kent 


1,841,736 


990,296 


691,280 


143,924 


155,092 


53.7 


37.5 


7.8 


8.4 


Montgomery 


71,168,234 


41,164,715 


34,408,325 


452,419 


6,303,971 


57.8 


48.3 


0.6 


8.9 


Prince George's . . . 
Queen Anne's 


46,933,161 


28,761,947 


21,111,458 


2,130,712 


5,519,777 


61.3 


45.0 


4.5 


11.8 


1,927,613 


1,381,812 


1,163,162 


49,176 


169,474 


71.6 


60.3 


2.5 


8.8 




2,450,808 


920,630 


696,225 


105,812 


118,593 


37.5 


28.4 


4.3 


4.8 


Somerset 


1,394,334 


489,717 


411,742 


15,500 


62,475 


35.1 


29.5 


1.1 


4.5 


Talbot 


2,902,639 


1,181,655 


883,408 


50,694 


247,553 


40.6 


30.4 


1.7 


8.5 


Washington 


9,778,517 


5,477,928 


4,682,807 


52,000 


743,121 


56.0 


47.9 


0.5 


7.6 




5,779,025 


2,805,637 


2,004,580 


126,059 


674,998 


48.5 


34.7 


2.1 


11.7 


Worcester 


3,452,186 


1,492,918 


1,181,659 


143,099 


168,160 


43.2 


34.2 


4.1 


4.9 



* Figures from State Fiscal Research Bureau: include taxes, licenses and permits, and fines and forfeitures. I 
t Figures from annual financial reports of local boards of education adjusted to conform to fiscal period of the local 
unit. 



Maryland State Department of Education 227 



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228 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 116—1963-64 Valuation of Property Assessable at Full Rate for 
County Purposes: State of Maryland 







County Commissioners 






Total 








State 


Local Unit 


Assessable at 








Tax 




Full Rate 






Personal 


Commissionf 






Total 


Real Estate 


Property 




Total State 


$10,358,975,155 


$8,162,128,696 


$7,967,093,038 


$195,035,658 


$2,196,846,459 


Allegany 


209,982,564 


146,150,334 


139,901,254 


6,249,080 


63,832,230 


Anne Arundel*. . . 


565,666,448 


470,376,018 


464,327,888 


6,048,130 


95,290,430 


Baltimore City*. 


2,757,130,606 


2,031,350,275 


1,994,988,875 


36,361,400 


725,780,331 




1,928,405,096 


1,554,833,468 


1,536,884,398 


17,949,070 


373,571,628 


Calvert 


36,980,725 


31,601,395 


30,287,507 


1,313,888 


5,379,330 


Caroline 


41,674,075 


33,015,035 


30,160,050 


2,854,985 


8,659,040 


Carroll* 


165,566,191 


125,669,611 


115,831,486 


9,838,125 


39,896,580 


Cecil 


116,849,085 


88,377,465 


82,338,445 


6,039,020 


28,471,620 


Charles 


81,306,290 


66,348,120 


63,685,050 


2,663,070 


14,958,170 




76,326,700 


55,071,340 


52,056,090 


3,015,250 


21,255,360 




240,745,268 


170,665,128 


145,346,423 


25,318,705 


70,080,140 


Garrett* 


45,063,825 


29,590,965 


26,165,140 


3,425,825 


15,472,860 




235,581,742 


173,909,512 


165,461,707 


8,447,805 


61,672.230 




159,045,765 


125,280,615 


121,795,030 


3,485,585 


33,765,150 


Kent* 


52,260,332 


41,637,392 


37,545,447 


4,091,945 


10,622,940 


Montgomery .... 


1,703,396,155 


1,436,398,885 


1,421,782,505 


14,616,380 


266,997,270 


Prince George's. . 


1,173,013,975 


989,861,625 


979,944,635 


9,916,990 


183,152,350 


Queen Anne's*. . . 


53,824,453 


45,289,823 


41,600,010 


3,689,813 


8,534,630 


St. Mary's 


61,788,871 


49,257,481 


46,585,923 


2,671,558 


12,531,390 




32,064,058 


25,318,798 


23,675,286 


1,643,512 


6,745,260 


Talbot 


73,678,845 


60,956,775 


56,708,340 


4,248,435 


12,722,070 


Washington* .... 


287,664,346 


208,257,766 


197,090,236 


11,167,530 


79,406,580 




161,033,381 


119,473,861 


115,196,900 


4,276,961 


41,559,520 


Worcester 


99,926,359 


83,437,009 


77,734,413 


5,702,596 


16,489,350 



* Fiscal period ends December 31; all others end June 30. 

t Data are for year ended December 31, 1963, adjusted as of October 1, 1964. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



229 



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Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 231 



TABLE 119— Federal Funds Allotted and Expended in Maryland: 
Vocational Education: 1963-64 



Types of 


Balance 


1963-64 


1963-64 


Balance 


Vocational Program 


July 1, 1963 


Allotment 


Expenditures 


June 30, 1964 


Total 


$47,358 


$721,937 


$686,845 


$82,450 


Agriculture 




124,479 


124,479 




Trades and Industry* 


47,358 


415,056 


380,191 


82,223 






122,368 


122,368 




Teachers Training and Supervision 




17,365 


17,365 




Distributive Occupations 




42,669 


42,442 


'227 



* Includes Practical Nurse Training and Technical. 



TABLE 120 — Expenditures for Administration and Supervision and Teacher 
Training in Vocational Education: State of Maryland: 1963-64 



Type of Vocational Program 



Sources of Expenditures 


Total 


Agriculture 


Trades and 
Industry* 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Occupations 


Total 












State and University Funds . 


$59,299 


$23,974 


$19,507 


$15,166 


$652 


Federal Funds 


66,824 


24,559 


19,507 


22,106 


652 


State Administration and 












Supervision 












State Funds 


28,971 


9,937 


8,156 


10,226 


652 


Federal Funds 


42,919 


16,945 


8,156 


17,166 


652 


Teacher Training 












University of Maryland 












Funds 


30,328 


14,037 


11,351 


4,940 




Federal Funds 


23,905 


7,614 


11,351 


4,940 





* Includes Practical Nurse Training and Technical. 



TABLE 121— Expenditures of Federal Funds in Maryland: 1963-64 



Type of Expenditures 


Type of Vocational Program 


Total 


Agriculture 


Trades and 
Industry* 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Occupations 


Total 


$686,845 


$132,093 


$385,002 


$127,308 


$42,442 


Instruction 












Adult Education 


114,910 


3,498 


42,342 


63,012 


6,058 




313,405 


83,583 


161,635 


34,206 


33,981 


Past Secondary 


45,310 


45,310 


Supervision 


53,006 


11,835 


32,262 


7,501 


l',408 




76,309 




76,309 




Other Costs 


17,081 


8,618 


7,637 


483 


343 




23,905 


7,614 


11,351 


4,940 




State Administration and 






42,919 


16,945 


8,156 


17,166 


652 



Includes Practical Nurse Training and Technical. 



232 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 122— High School Equivalence: State of .Maryland: 1954-55—1963-64 



Year 


Number of Applicants Who 


Total Number 
of 

Certificates 
Issued 


Completed 
Examination* 


Earned 
Certificate 


Earned Certificate 
through USAFIt 


1954-55 


1,495 


885 


717 


1,602 


1955-56 


1,476 


854 


967 


1,821 


1956-57 


1,603 


954 


740 


1,694 


1957-58 


1,802 


963 


837 


1,800 


1958-59 


1,681 


867 


722 


1,589 


1959-60 


1,850 


951 


712 


1,663 


1960-61 


1,940 


1,002 


833 


1,835 


1961-62 


2,327 


1,181 


719 


1,900 


1962-63 


2,595 


1,307 


746 


2,053 


1963-64 


3,015 


1,455 


747 


2,202 



* Includes re-tests. 

t United States Armed Forces Institute. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



233 



TABLE 123 — Adult Education: Receipts and Expenditures: State of Maryland: 

1963-64 



Local Unit 


Receipts for Adult Education from 
Sources Other than Local 


expenditures for adult 
Education 


Total 


Federal 


State 


Fees from 
Attendance 


Total 


Salaries 


Expenses 


Total State 


5696,524 


§365,242 


$78,192 


$253,090 


$1,166,158 


$1,027,763 


$138,395 


Allegany 


23,457 


*19,121 


1,930 


2,406 


14,584 


9,350 


5,234 


Anne Arundel 


13,214 


1,265 


4,099 


7,850 


17,000 


16,602 


398 


Baltimore City 


279,091 


*199,436 


23,845 


55,810 


t691,187 


589,520 


tl01,667 


Baltimore 


54,718 


23,863 


8,024 


22,831 


126,378 


121,652 


4,726 


Calvert 


125 




125 




250 


250 


Caroline 


2,330 


381 


1,217 


732 


1,877 


1,832 


45 


Carroll 


2,488 




2,252 


236 


2,725 


2,555 


170 


Cecil 


7,604 


*3,512 


1,315 


2,777 


9,292 


6,S45 


2,447 


Charles 


1,217 


492 


725 




640 


640 




Dorchester 


17,497 


*16,360 


1,087 


"50 


1,877 


1,877 




Frederick 


10,809 


7,434 


1,940 


1,435 


22,779 


21,165 


1,614 


Garrett 


822 




822 


1.161 


1,161 


Harford 


9,276 


1,475 


4,101 


3,700 


10,981 


10,981 




Howard 


1,896 


550 


730 


616 


3,957 


3,957 




Kent 


1,526 


84 


948 


494 


1,509 


1,136 


'373 


Montgomery 


144,969 


*49.390 


5,330 


90,249 


101,229 


97,316 


3,913 


Prince George's 


82,728 


13,006 


7,135 


62,587 


119,078 


107,008 


12,070 




503 


56 


447 




1,779 


1,779 




St. Mary's 










2,667 


2,667 






i.ioi 




1,101 




1,270 


1,270 




Talbot 


1,140 


391 


749 




797 


797 




Washington 


27,751 


*19.021 


8,730 




15,321 


15,321 




Wicomico 


11,970 


*9,405 


1,300 


1,265 


tl 6,862 


11,302 


5,560 


Worcester 


292 




240 


52 


958 


780 


178 



* Includes the following: Allegany— ARA. $13,384; Baltimore City— MDTA, $155,799, Vocational Rehabilitation, 
$7,763; Cecil— ARA, $3,308; Dorchester— ARA, MDTA, $16,360; Montgomery— MDTA, $25,291; Washington— ARA, 
$12,980; Wicomico— MDTA, $8,591. 

t Includes the following: Baltimore City— MDTA, $70,649; Wicomico— MDTA, $13,071. 



234 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



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236 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



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237 



TABLE 126 — Vocational Adult Education Program*: By Title of Course 
and Number of Classes: State of Maryland: 1963-64 



Title of Course 



Number 

of 
Classes 



Title of Course 



Agriculture 

Arc welding 

Farm machine repair 

Other agriculture 

Total 

Distributive Education 

Bookkeeping 

Business English 

Business management instruction . . 

Financial planning 

Public speaking 

Real estate 

Supervisory management 

Other (one class in each course) 
business financing, candy sales, 
fashion, power painting, sales 
conference, sales (protective coat- 
ing) 

Total 

Home Economics 

Clothing 

Cooking 

Crafts 

Dressmaking 

Family living 

Furniture upholstering, repairing . . 

Home nursing 

Interior decorating 

Millinery 

Rug making 

Sewing 

Slip covers 

Tailoring 

Total 



182 
19 
6 
22 
12 
8 
11 
21 
25 
33 

107 
10 
42 

498 



Trades and Industry 

Air conditioning 

Apprenticeship training course. . . . 

Auto mechanics 

Barbering 

Blueprint reading and drafting ... 

Boiler operation 

Building trades 

Cosmetology 

Electricity 

Electronics 

Glazing 

Iron working 

Machine shop 

Mathematics 

Plumbing 

Printing trades 

Radio and television 

Refrigeration 

Sheet metal 

Speed reading 

Tailoring 

Trowel trades 

Welding 

Woodworking 

Other (one class in each course) 
airframe and power plant, appli- 
ance service, automatic washing 
machine, baking, cabinetmaking, 
food service, glassblowing, hand 
composition, industrial sewing, 
leadburners, nurses aid, oilburner 
service, shoe repair, stationary 
engineering 

Total 

Technical 

Electronics 

Total 



Programs administered by local boards of education. 



238 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



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239 



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240 Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 

TABLE 129 — Vocational Rehabilitation Services Rendered: State of Maryland: 1963-64 





Total 




Being 




Being 


Surveyed i 


Closed: 


Local Unit 


Number 


Rehabili- 


Followed 


Training 


Prepared 


Under Ad- 


Other 




Cases 


tated 


on Jobs 


Completed 


for Jobs 


visement 


Services 




6,670 


1,974 


187 


711 


1,410 


1,606 


782 




130 


36 




31 


35 


25 


3 


Anne Arundel 


451 


129 


11 


34 


97 


157 


23 


Baltimore City. . . . 


2,358 


677 


60 


264 


513 


507 


337 


Baltimore 


641 


168 


16 


37 


141 


127 


152 




58 


13 


2 


4 


11 


23 


5 




50 


13 


3 


5 


13 


13 


3 




156 


53 


6 


13 


18 


63 


3 


Cecil 


94 


36 


3 


13 


20 


11 


11 




103 


37 


5 


6 


17 


29 


9 


Dorchester 


87 


19 


2 


20 


19 


10 


17 


Frederick 


209 


91 


1 


17 


30 


46 


24 


Garrett 


57 


25 




11 


14 


6 


1 


Harford 


76 


40 




7 


15 


12 


2 


Howard 


80 


28 


"6 


4 


19 


20 


3 


Kent 


30 


10 


1 


7 


6 


2 


4 


Montgomery 


677 


175 


10 


65 


153 


199 


75 


Prince George's. . . . 


518 


156 


3 


39 


123 


167 


30 


Queen Anne's 


26 


9 




4 


9 


2 


2 


St. Mary's 


101 


26 


' '3 


8 


10 


47 


7 


Somerset 


62 


23 


6 


9 


10 


5 


9 


Talbot 


68 


20 


2 


13 


14 


9 


10 


Washington 


411 


114 


24 


74 


75 


109 


15 


Wicomico 


172 


56 


17 


25 


33 


10 


31 


Worcester 


55 


20 


6 


1 


15 


7 


6 



PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CLIENTS SERVED 



Characteristic 



Total 


Rehabili- 
tated* 


Otherf 


Characteristic 


Total 


6,670 


1,974 


4,696 


Race 






White 


4,694 










1,971 


1,906 


404 


1,502 


Other 


5 


1,281 


427 


854 






1,306 


398 


908 


Sex 




693 


232 


461 


Male 


4,407 


567 


182 


385 




2,263 


452 


157 


295 






306 


103 


203 


Marital Status 




108 


45 


63 


Single 


3,071 


33 


15 


18 




2,458 


18 


11 


7 


Other 


1,141 








Employment History 




63 


25 


38 


(at Survey) 




329 


94 


235 




603 


848 


256 


592 


Unemployed 


6,067 


2,264 


681 


1,583 


Never worked .... 


1,476 


2,644 


765 


1,879 


Worked at 




231 


89 


142 


some time 


4,591 


124 


21 


103 






167 


43 


124 


Number on Welfare 










(at Survey) 


769 


4,173 


1,079 


3,094 






767 


287 


480 






517 


187 


330 






446 


150 


296 






283 


105 


178 






198 


65 


133 






286 


101 


185 







Rehabili- 
tated* 



Otherf 



Total Number . 

Age 

Under 21. . . 

21—30 

31—40 

41—45 

46—50 

51—55 

56—60 

61—65 

66—70 

Over 70 ... . 

Education 
None 

1—3 

4—6 

7—9 

10—12 

13—14 

15—16 

Unknown . . . 

Dependents 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

More than 5 



1,438 
533 



1,252 
722 



728 
878 
368 



381 
1,593 
318 

1,275 



203 



3,256 
1,438 
2 



3,155 
1,541 



2,343 
1,580 
773 



222 
4,474 
1,158 

3,316 



566 



* Clients who were rehabilitated into employment during year (1,974). 
t Clients who were still receiving services at end of year (4,696). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



241 



TABLE 130 — Cost of Vocational Rehabilitation Case Services Rendered: 
State of Maryland: 1963-64 





Number of 


Average 


Total 


Type of Service 


Clients 


Cost 


Expenditure 


Total 


8,270 


$117.86 


$974,725.03 


Diagnosis 


3,167 


31.56 


99,943.92 


I^Iedical 


2*558 


21.13 


54,058.86 


Psychiatric 


89 


56.85 


5^059.60 


Psychological 


317 


55.92 


17,727.17 


Occupational 


203 


113.78 


23,098.29 


Surgery and Treatment 


734 


129.07 


94,740.50 


I^Xedical 


197 


38.37 


7,558.79 


Psychiatric 


47 


177.57 


8^346.00 


Surgical 


215 


154.84 


33^290.50 


Dental 


164 


191.87 


31^466.50 


Physical and occupational therapy 


111 


126.84 


14|078.71 


Prosthetic Appliances 


762 


155.49 


118,479.97 


Artificial appliances 


233 


330.60 


77^029.15 


Braces 


111 


82.07 


9^1 10.01 


Hearing aids 


72 


190.19 


13)693.60 


Glasses and artificial eyes 


194 


30.39 


5,894.97 


Surgical appliances 


116 


64.63 


7,496.94 


Wheelchairs hand and power operated 


36 


145.98 


5,255.30 


Hospitalization and Convalescent Care 


299 


380.55 


113,784.84 


Hospitalization 


289 


385.58 


111,432.12 




1 


545.12 


545.12 




9 


200.84 


1,807.60 


Training and Training Materials 


1,694 


198.28 


335,888.89 




126 


139.49 


13,949.88 


Educational institutions 


938 


299.98 


281,382.01 


Employment 


30 


244.33 


7,330.00 


Correspondence 


36 


104.26 


3,753.58 


Tutorial 


108 


98.34 


10,620.89 


Training materials 


456 


41.34 


18,852.53 


Maintenance and Transportation 


1,446 


137.82 


199,281.97 


Maintenance 








Training 


578 


266.35 


153,950.88 




17 


44.82 


761.86 


Placement 


60 


55.39 


3,323.35 


Medical care 


29 


48.38 


1,402.90 


Transportation 








Training 


525 


66.49 


34,905.07 


Medical or physical restoration 


137 


28.88 


3,956.04 


Placement 


100 


9.82 


981.87 


Occupational Tools and Equipment (Clients) 


168 


75.03 


12,604.94 



242 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 131— Nature of Disability of Rehabilitation Clients: 
State of Maryland: 1963-64 



Type of Disability 


Total 


Rehabilitated* 


Otherf 


Total 


6,670 


1,974 


4,696 


Amputation 


490 


221 


269 


Arm or hand 


91 


36 


55 


Arms or hands 


10 


3 


7 


Leg or foot 


349 


162 


187 




33 


16 


17 


Multiple 


7 


4 


3 




1,783 


533 


1,250 


Arm or hand 


186 


68 


118 


Arms or hands 


40 


7 


33 




386 


113 


273 


Legs or feet 


285 


87 


198 


Multiple 


274 


59 


215 


Back, spine, dwarf 


412 


99 


313 


Neck, head, face 


200 


100 


100 


Vision 


529 


159 


370 


Blind, both eyes 


229 


58 


171 


Blind, one eye 


140 


46 


94 


Defective vision 


160 


55 


105 


Hearing 


361 


117 


244 


Totally deaf 


121 


26 


95 




240 


91 


149 




667 


126 


541 


Miscellaneous 


2,840 


818 


2,022 


Heart 


102 


25 


77 


394 


99 


295 


Epilepsy 


205 


52 


153 




808 


236 


572 




486 


109 


377 


Other 


845 


297 


548 



* Clients who were rehabilitated into employment during year (1,974). 
t Clients who were still receiving service at end of year (4,696). 



Maryland State Department of Education 243 



TABLE 132 



-Number of Vocational Rehabilitation Referrals by Reporting 
Agencies: State of Maryland: 1963-64 



Types of Referrals 



Total 



Rehabilitated* 



Total 

Educational 

Business and Other Colleges 

Private Schools 

Public Schools 

State Schools for Handicapped 

Health Agencies 

Crippled Children 

Mental Hospitals 

Tuberculosis 

Chronic Disease 

Other Hospitals 

Other Agencies 

Physicians 

Other Government Agencies 

Selective Service 

State Rehabilitation 

State Employment 

Public Officials 

U.S. Civil Service Commission 

Miscellaneous Gov't. Agencies 

Insurance 

Casualty Companies 

Bureau of Old-Age and Survivors Insurance 
State Workmen's Compensation Commission 
U.S. Bureau of Employee's Compensation. . 

Welfare 

Public Agencies 

Private Agencies 

Community Advisory Centers 

Miscellaneous 

Artificial Appliance Companies 

Employers 

Labor Unions 

Other Individuals 

Self-referred 

Other 



6,670 


1,974 


4,696 


1,097 


203 


894 


29 


9 


20 


47 


7 


40 


787 


143 


644 


234 


44 


190 


2,741 


845 


1,896 


25 




£U 


318 


100 


218 


498 


91 


407 


69 


19 


50 


706 


250 


450 


620 


168 


452 


505 


212 


293 


420 


123 


297 


2 




2 


54 


' 21 


33 


160 


51 


109 


41 


11 


30 


12 


4 


8 


151 


36 


15 


385 


98 


287 


12 


3 


9 


199 


43 


156 


165 


51 


114 


9 


1 


8 


638 


170 


468 


528 


133 


395 


71 


25 


46 


39 


12 


27 


1,389 


535 


854 


89 


52 


37 


36 


22 


14 


3 


1 


2 


503 


162 


341 


671 


282 


389 


87 


16 


71 



* Clients who were rehabilitated into employment during year (1,974). 
t Clients who were still receiving service at end of year (4,696). 



244 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



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246 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE 134— FINANCIAI^STATEMENT 
Maryland State Department of Education: Headquarters and Vocational 
Rehabilitation: 1963-64 



Source or Purpose 


Headquarters 


Vocational 
Rehabilitation 


RECEIPTS 


General Fund Appropriation 


$48,798 
1,130,771 


$34,674 
707,592 


Federal Fund Appropriation 


233,075 
*(77,782) 
1,694 
75,277 
88,479 


1,294,234 
*(91,884) 
5,598 






8,018 


Total Funds Available 


$1,500,312 


$1,958,232 


DISBURSEMENTS 




Departmental 
and Financial 
Administration 
$345,477 
35,170 
10,569 
16,567 
3,454 
51,821 
11,615 
219 
5,005 
953 
3,851 


Administration 

$80,983 
4,777 
2,151 
4,080 

826 
3,180 
1,410 

619 
1,967 
3,937 
1,256 




Travel 






Total 


$484,701 

Supervisory and 
Consultative 
Services 
$382,858 
44,505 
13,712 
28,133 
5,499 
21,272 
10,710 
1,649 
7,720 
15,990 
950 


$105,186 

Placement 

and 
Guidance 
$450,898 
8,727 
17,406 
20,391 
1,822 
537 
5,677 
711 
4,867 
19,888 
22,210 






Travel 








$532,998 


$553,134 





Maryland State Department of Education 



247 



TABLE 134— Continued— FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Maryland State Department of Education: Headquarters and Vocational 
Rehabilitation: 1963-64 



Source or Purpose 


Headquarters 


Vocational 
Rehabilitation 


DISBURSEME> 


ITS 





Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Total Program Expenditures 

Other Expenditures 

Total Disbursements 

Unexpended Balance Returned to Treasury 
Balance, June 30, 1964 



Administrative 
Services 
$160,190 
31,651 
5,442 
4,479 
1,621 
5,733 
2,656 
194 
69 



$212,035 

Library 
Extension 
Services 
$ 

88,833 

$88,833 

$1,318,567 
72,379 



$1,390,946 
58,630 
$50,736 



Case 
Services 



$968,223 



$968,223 

Disability 
Determinations 
(O.A.S.I.) 
$105,118 
133,484 
2,404 
3,729 
166 
1,779 



439 
7,314 
6,300 



$260,733 



$1,887,276 



$1,887,276 
26,565 
$44,391 



* Denotes red figure. 



248 Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



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268 Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE XI — Disbursements for All Purposes: Maryland Local 











Outgoing Transfers 






Total 


Interest 


Capital 












Local Unit 


Disburse- 


for Debt 


Outlay* 


To Other 


Tuition- 


School 


Total 






ments* 


Service* 


School 


Handicapped 


Lunch and 


Current 


Instruction 










Units 


Children 


Special Milk 


Expenses 




Total State 


$414,713,153 


$16,610,186 


$86,781,942 


$204,503 


$639,160 


$3,286,694 


$307,190,668 


$220,437,689 


Allegany 


8,185,965 


105,635 


1,218,986 


28 


1,200 


118,542 


6,741,574 


4,752,805 


Anne Arundel . . . 


30,507,250 


1,360,079 


8,851,657 


*1,504 


4,398 


281,851 


OA A A 7 

-sO, 007, 761 


1 A TAfi CAA 

14, /ub.oOO 


Baltimore City . . 


91,075,083 


3,178,765 


14,426,882 




203,075 


436,385 


72,829,976 


53,550,242 


Baltimore 


67,568,278 


3,601,823 


14,615,763 


*ll',392 


49,836 


588,185 


48,701,279 


35,268,845 


Calvert 


2,578,736 


85,583 


361,054 


16 


600 


22,089 


2,109,394 


1,388,756 


Caroline 


2,370,618 


94,624 


194,551 


166 


1,200 


22,897 


2,057,180 


1,391,480 


Carroll 


5,252,673 


43,183 


395,477 


336 




64,139 


4,749,538 


o >*AA AAA 

6, 400, 009 


Cecil 


4,828,147 


209,488 


182,103 


8 


1,350 


45,951 


4,389,247 


3,071,149 


Charles 


5,689,342 


140,398 


1,740,396 




4,500 


38,043 


3,766,005 


2,492,571 


Dorchester 


3,401,056 


112,958 


673,646 


Tl9,l7i 


600 


25,741 


2,568,940 


1,680,637 


Frederick 


9,183,888 


441,235 


1,435,996 


2,498 




92,573 


7,211,586 


5,167,101 


Garrett 


2,079,209 


35,549 


121,366 


18,288 




36,923 


1,867,083 


1,188,853 


Harford 


11,079,581 


559,905 


1,823,972 




3,388 


112,005 


8,580,311 


5,841,700 


Howard 


5,735,460 


157,298 


1,346,808 


125,428 




66,730 


4,039,196 


2,958,609 


Kent 


1 784 344 


30,227 


1QQ r.QQ 


28 


3,038 


18,400 


1,533,053 


1,084,134 


Montgomery. . . . 


70,468,205 


2,974,506 


14,835,755 


3,152 


218,906 


495,371 


51,940,515 


36,812,434 


Prince George's . . 


65,107,819 


2,563,950 


21,554,295 


1,136 


130,989 


550,220 


40,307,229 


29,448,862 


Queen Anne's . . . 


2,021,862 


36,287 


171,723 


1,162 


1,800 


23,131 


1,787,759 


1,201,082 


St. Mary's 


3,263,525 


37,086 


327,889 




3,900 


28,869 


2,865,781 


1,860,328 


Somerset 


1,890,666 


60,687 


97,270 


1,272 




10,844 


1,720,593 


1,165,573 


Talbot 


2,279,251 


78,335 


455,159 


288 


2,700 


19,137 


1,723,632 


1,193,337 


Washington 


10,068,123 


447,615 


419,396 






113,492 


9,087,620 


6,289,474 




5,711,820 


208,353 


1,100,975 


18,470 


6,000 


50,513 


4,327,509 


3,047,109 


Worcester 


2,582,252 


46,617 


231,225 


160 


1,680 


24,663 


2,277,907 


1,475,999 



* Includes disbursements for community colleges. See TABLES XIX and XX for these amounts, 
t Includes $18,251 ARA-MDTA. 

t Includes Teachers' Retirement and Social Security paid direct by State. 

° Excludes Federal reimbursement for school lunch and special milk shown as an outgoing transfer in column 6. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



269 



Boards of Education: 1963-61 



Current Expenses 



Pupil 
Personnel 
Services 


Health 
Services 


Operation 
of Plant 
and Equip- 
ment 


Mainte- 
nance of 
Plant 


Pupil 
Trans- 
portation 


Adminis- 
tration 


Fixed 
Charges? 


Food 
Services 


Student 

Body 
Activities 


Com- 
munity 
Services 


Com- 
munity 
Colleges 


$2,149,742 


$606,755 


$26,182,622 


$11,239,293 


$12,607,666 


$5,249,148 


$23,362,312 


$559,103 


$432,865 


$426,828 


$3,936,645 


42,100 
133,404 
598,468 
320,236 

11,592 


1 905 

I — yo 

83,070 
202,868 
241 


1,345,994 
6,906,419 
4,552,036 
129,983 


1 QO fi"5Q 

617,121 
2,363,357 
2,120,356 
85,118 


400, UoU 

1,181,955 
424,291 

1,695,126 
318,244 


RA AOQ 

302,834 
1,179,826 
601,111 
41,786 


i An I'i 1 
1,495,698 
6,490,201 
3,239,620 

130,081 


1 5 "JO 

oo, 1 4y 

107,272 
85,339 
3,593 


9 am 
14,434 
220,910 
33,957 


iu6i 

13,975 


174 90S 

198,420 
905,920 
567,810 


1 1 Q79 

25,338 
29,233 
27,441 
11,066 


007 

4,125 
579 


1 AO BOO 

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271,452 
392,248 
233,273 
204,088 


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115,984 
105,649 
132,030 


261 482 
438i060 
367,995 
404,852 
324,154 


oo, ooy 
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85,065 
58,097 
39,759 


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298,970 
216,633 
173,610 


9 119 

6,366 
9,370 
24,464 
3,017 


6 411 

34^995 

9,846 


10,705 
15,108 
106,056 


87,123 


27,532 
9,168 
42,458 
21,624 
11,275 


17,481 
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15,699 
588 
131 


522,435 
100,295 
587,423 
207,188 
89,770 


229,868 
68,892 
331,005 
101,403 
44,621 


420,810 
334,943 
861,266 
389,489 
159,116 


94,373 
37,932 
174,077 
52,400 
34,918 


491,678 
122,876 
535,712 
265,564 
103,865 


102,338 
3,323 

3,983 


'800 
16,105 


45,169 

26,226 
1,240 


92,801 
190,971 


459,607 
225,332 
8,810 
20,177 
10,952 


9,681 
207,871 
405 
2,449 


4,406,460 
3,727,286 
108,607 
227,168 
107,193 


1,731,408 
1,745,482 

82,499 
195,322 

55,199 


1,337,386 
1,044,827 
232,787 
317,878 
227,027 


1,606,833 
396,272 
34,499 
56,062 
26,154 


4,240,477 
2,979,232 
112,670 
165,207 
125,868 


23,476 
115,844 

12,842 
603 


78,060 

7,967 
1,994 


128,354 
48,541 
6,400 
381 
30 


1,184,399 
289,610 


9,248 
48,858 
24,929 
19,522 


37,607 
11,457 


123,676 
767,599 
323,110 
157,922 


55,962 
434,610 
126,594 
108,033 


178,461 
484,390 
429,889 
318,208 


35,331 
140,478 
52,107 
35,027 


116,506 
624,146 
303,742 
160,714 


1,269 
10,672 
4,989 
2,482 


1,000 
3,583 


8,842 
4.500 


245,296 



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3 — iSSTO CM CO CM tO -r 

CM OS 3 oc ^ co -r CO_ t 

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276 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



s 




8 


Other 


$57,090 


ll',30i 


1,311 


. ie> ■ 
• OS • 


1,800 


1,240 


40,2i3 
"30 


o o • • 
§§ '. '■ 


: 1963H 




Other Charg 


Non- 
public 
School 
Transpor- 
tation 


$263,911 


13,976 


9,394 
14,236 
105,961 


42,874 


26,226 




34,574 
8,328 


8,342 


Public Schools 


VICES 


Total 
Other 
Charges 


o 
© 

CM 
CO 

e» 


ll,30i 
13,976 


10,705 
14,236 
106,056 


44,674 


26,226 
1,240 


34,574 
48,541 

30 


8,842 
600 


OS 

a 

CO 

E 

S5 

P 


Supplies 

and 
Materials 


CD 

GO 

«» 














■ . .oo . 




yland ] 


C0M1Y 


Con- 
tracted 
Services 


CO 

o 

co" 
e» 














CO 




es: Mai 




Salaries 

and 
Wages 


$99,234 






os . 






93,780 
' 187 


3,900 


munity Servic< 




Total 
Com- 
munity 
Services 


$426,829 


n'ioi 

13,976 


10,705 
15,108 
106,056 


45,169 


26,226 
1,240 


128,354 
48,541 
6,400 
381 
on 


8,842 
4,500 




Other 
Charges 


$28,062 


633 
14,080 


6,411 
500 


3,438 


:§ 






'956 
1,994 




ties, and Com 


r Body Activities 


Supplies 

and 
Materials 


$174,653 


77,328 


33,596 


4,933 


■ o 

• CO 


16,105 




37,051 
5,340 




Con- 
tracted 
Services 


$94,435 


36,019 
33,566 




1,475 








17,122 
1,670 


1,000 
3,583 


y Activi 


Studen 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


$135,714 


2,170 
354 
107,563 
391 


• OS 

• OS 

• oo 




• o 






23,887 




5, Student Bod; 




Total 
Student 

Body 
Activities 


$432,864 


2,803 
14,434 
220,910 
33,957 


6,411 
34,995 


9,846 


• o 

• o 

• 00 


16,105 




78,060 

7,966 
1,994 


1,000 
3,583 




Equip- 
ment — 
Replace- 
ment 


$63,968 


32,5io 
109 


3,05i 


CM • 
CM • 


3,495 
1,348 


1,177 


13,673 
5,94i 


1,177 
1,365 


• Food Services 




Other 
Charges 


CM 

oo" 

CO 

t*> 


649 

:::: 

1,141 

350 


1,182 
437 


6,136 
3,017 


10,760 
1,783 


• ec 
3 

• oc 




3,276 
2,060 

992 
603 


202 
1,661 
1,057 


Iervices 


Supplies 

and 
Materials 


$186,336 


25,000 

107,272 
352 


. OS oo • • 
■ -tfi CM • • 
. t*i CM ■ • 


2,477 






197 
49,716 

'270 


CM O CO • 
OS rl ■ 
CM • 


[I — Disbursements foi 


Food £ 


Con- 
tracted 
Services 


$12,321 




2,429 
5,342 


3,391 






1,159 






Salaries 

and 
Wages 


$258,366 


10,100 
51,336 

O,lo1 


930 

3,800 
18,206 


82,215 
192 






20,003 
50,395 

4,480 


10,400 
1,750 
1,425 




Total 
Food 
Services 


$559,103 


35,749 

107,272 
85,339 
3 593 


2,112 
6,366 


24,464 
3,017 


102,338 
3,323 


• CO 

• cc 

• as 

' CO 




23,476 
115,844 

12,842 
603 


1,269 
10,672 
4,989 
2,482 


TABLE XV] 






Local Unit 


;al State 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore City 


Carroll 


Charles 


Frederick 

Kent 




Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


Talbot 

Washington 










Toi 



















Maryland State Department of Education 



277 



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278 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 279 



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10 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 





Total Senior High School Enrollment by Course 


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14,148.7 

374.2 
13.0 
14.0 
86.1 
86.1 
38.0 
37.0 
27.0 
43.0 
11.0 
11.0 
8.0 

976.0 
51.0 
90.2 
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44.5 

102.0 
76.0 
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79.1 
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62.9 
55.5 
69.0 
87.0 
16.1 

13.0 

8.6 


Local Unit 
Name of High School 


I 
i 

:- 


i 


Flintstone Sr.-Jr 

Fort Hill Sr.-Jr 

Bruce Sr.-Jr 

Valley Sr.-Jr 

Beall Sr.-Jr 

Penna. Av. Elem. (7th) 
Beall Elementary (7th) 

Anne Arundel 


Southern Sr.-Jr 

Severna Park Sr.-Jr. . . 
Brooklyn Park Sr.-Jr. . 

Andover Sr 

Bates Sr.-Jr 

George Fox Jr 

Arundel Jr 

Annapolis Jr. Annex 

Bates Jr. Annex. 

Annapolis Elem. 

Annex. (8th) 

Rolling Knolls 

Elem. (7th) 



Maryland State Department of Education 281 



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18281 32 :2882 i ! 8838238 i -8 iS3« 2*2 = = ••;• • = ; • i : • ; 


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PIIIIPIIPII immmmm zmmmzmmmm 




Baltimokk City 

Frederick Douglass 

Mergenthaler 

Carver 

Junior High Schools 
Gen. Vocational Schs. 

Woodlawn Sr 

Milford Mill Sr. 

Towson Sr 

Parkville Sr 

Perry Hall Sr 

Patapsco Sr 

Dundalk Sr. 

Lansdowne Sr 

Ridgely Jr.- 

Dulanev Sr 

Sollers Point Sr.- Jr. 
Sparrows Point Sr.-Jr. 

Catonsville Jr 

Johnnvcake Jr 

Woodlawn Jr 

Sudbrook Jr. 

Towson town Jr. 
Dundalk Jr. 

North Point Jr 

Golden Ring Jr 

Parkville Jr 

Stemmers Run Jr 
Middle River Jr 
Deep Creek Jr. 



282 



Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



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111 



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288 Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 



TABLE XXII — Enrollment by Subject, Including Duplicates: 



T 

Local Unit 


Total 




Social 




Mathe- 










Enroll- 


English 


Studies 


Science 


matics 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


rsame ot rlign bcnool 


ment 












Trvfil St* TP 


9Q4 fiQS 


351 273 


283 491 


224 211 


22Q 8f)0 


10 085 




21 170 


Allegany 


8,743 


11,686 


9,183 


7,016 


6,245 


632 


1,123 


405 


Oldtown Sr.-Jr 


213 


298 


218 


196 


143 








Flintstone Sr.-Jr 


239 


307 


269 


208 


160 




'22 




Fort Hill Sr.-Jr 


2,180 


2,877 


2,465 


1,767 


1.513 


215 


207 


i38 


Allegany Sr.-Jr 


2,259 


3,011 


2,419 


1,728 


1,658 


271 


88 


267 




848 


1,090 


875 


661 


488 




233 




Valley Sr.-Jr 


820 


1,075 


764 


610 


535 


43 


175 




Mt. Savage Sr.-Jr 


589 


765 


597 


512 


433 


17 


140 




Beall Sr.-Jr 


1,030 


1,199 


1,012 


746 


727 


86 


258 




Cresaptown Jr 


214 


362 


214 


214 


214 










218 


436 


217 


218 


217 








Beall Elem. (7th) 


133 


266 


133 


156 


157 








Anne Arundel 


21,673 


27,410 


22,578 


15,195 


16,983 


380 


3,078 


673 


Arundel Sr 


1,235 


1,330 


1,415 


967 


655 




242 


151 


Glen Burnie Sr 


2,194 


2,346 


1,922 


1,453 


1,053 


i25 


450 






1 617 


1 844 


2 073 


1 177 


1 108 


58 


410 


213 




'829 


'986 


'857 


590 


'634 




181 






2,311 


2,806 


2,467 


1,562 


1,753 


'69 


423 


218 




1,739 


2,041 


1,795 


1,151 


1,260 


38 


191 




Andover Sr.-Jr 


1,811 


2,452 


1,936 


1,162 


1,379 


90 


285 




Bates Sr.-Jr 


1,615 


1,784 


1,962 


1,209 


1,089 




93 




Cockran Jr 


1,643 


2,777 


1,643 


1,078 


1,643 




170 




George Fox Jr 


1,297 


1,708 


1,241 


840 


1,241 




62 




Marley Jr 


1,163 


1,488 


1,126 


826 


1,007 




219 




Arundel, Jr 


1,618 


2,085 


1,618 


1,198 


1,618 




171 






1,718 


2,343 


1,680 


1,680 


1,680 




181 




Bates Jr 


375 


706 


335 




355 










302 


302 


302 


302 


302 








Rolling Knolls Elem. (7th) 


206 


412 


206 




206 








Baltimore City 


67,095 


68,413 


71,733 


56,060 


55,031 


2,120 


14,035 


4,099 




1 851 


2 491 


2 064 


1 213 


1 209 


36 


205 


61 


Dunbar 


l!888 


2', 125 


l!291 


M38 


U19 




271 


212 


Edmondson 


2,870 


3,095 


1,874 


1,779 


1,185 


86 


363 


262 


Polytechnic 


2,316 


2,483 


2,182 


1,728 


3,026 




1,130 






2,955 


3,172 


3,070 


2,118 


1,653 


268 


791 


302 




2,268 


2,504 


2,135 


1,430 


1,249 


31 


222 


112 


Forest Park 


2,376 


2,755 


2,172 


1,751 


1,265 


55 


502 


536 




1,344 


1,452 


861 


952 


883 


421 


700 


140 


City College 


3,419 


3,697 


2,899 


2,486 


2,559 


228 


1,037 


432 


Frederick Douglass 


2,351 


2,766 


1,834 


1,878 


1,363 


39 


601 


503 




1,925 


2,241 


1,777 


1,751 


1,680 








Carver 


1,408 


1,686 


1,212 


1,113 


1,224 








Junior High Schools 


38,601 


36,659 


47,020 


35,154 


35,239 


956 


8,213 


1,539 


General Voc. Schools 


1,523 


1,287 


1,342 


1,269 


1,277 








Baltimore 


46,707 


71,146 


49,144 


38,678 


36,788 


1,457 


7,893 


5,482 




2,039 


2,345 


2,409 


1,376 


1,247 


111 


499 


376 




1,727 


1,871 


1,853 


1,120 


1,067 


84 


317 


348 


Milford Mill Sr 


1,785 


1,956 


2,108 


1,174 


1,318 


81 


571 


400 


Franklin Sr 


975 


1,116 


1,048 


598 


548 


35 


266 


135 




2,009 


2,307 


2,235 


1,368 


1,516 


188 


701 


356 




2,011 


2,177 


2,269 


1,220 


1,119 


80 


367 


383 


Perry Hall Sr 


773 


805 


793 


559 


413 


40 


182 


141 


Patapsco Sr 


927 


1,005 


977 


709 


403 


39 


162 


65 




2,191 


2,375 


2,443 


1,283 


1,198 


90 


362 


230 




777 


830 


835 


575 


317 


7 


98 


138 


Overlea Sr 


1,694 


1,809 


1,926 


994 


822 


84 


210 


227 




2,355 


2,627 


2,754 


1,414 


1,233 


137 


299 


274 




1,209 


1,850 


1,224 


1,017 


950 




259 






1,715 


2,442 


1,764 


1,420 


1,515 


149 


536 


4is 




838 


1,446 


801 


796 


673 




75 






2,044 


3,040 


2,105 


1,562 


1,457 


61 


323 


140 


Catonsville Jr 


1,255 


2,345 


1,234 


1,232 


1.230 


24 


235 




1,016 


1,932 


1,239 


986 


991 




112 


70 




1,273 


2,424 


1,276 


1,275 


1,269 




145 


140 


Sudbrook Jr 


1,492 


2,745 


1,496 


1,495 


1,492 


25 


272 


229 




1,271 


2,459 


1,241 


1,263 


1,258 


34 


142 


81 




1,007 


1,856 


975 


1,002 


1987 


45 


275 


90 




1,375 


2,792 


1,342 


1,349 


1,349 




139 


139 




1,168 


2,129 


1,205 


1,162 


1,149 


'84 


185 


115 


Dundalk Jr 


1,080 


2,115 


1,065 


1,070 


1,065 




171 


63 


Holabird Jr 


1,329 


2,593 


1,310 


1.310 


1,303 




89 


59 


North Point Jr 


1,326 


2,521 


1,301 


1,301 


1,289 




160 


86 
171 


Arbutus Jr 


1,475 


2,913 


1,455 


1,455 


1,455 




105 



Maryland State Department of Education 289 



Each Maryland Public High School: Fall of 1963 



Other 




Industrial Education 






r nysicai 




Ar t 






I oreign 


Agri- 






Home 


i>usiness 










c • 1 
opecial 


Lan- 


culture 






Eco- 


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Health 


w . 

JM.US1C 


and 


r.uu ' ut .on 


Education 


guages 




Arts 


Vocational 


nomics 




JjUUtallUU 




Crafts 






3,573 


3,885 


100,211 


16,373 


75,776 


122,720 


264,063 


164,273 


104,298 


11,624 


33,473 


22 


40 


1,796 


414 


1,940 


3,891 


5,122 


5,906 


2,963 


579 


31 










68 


82 


207 


208 


77 








40 


57 




80 


63 


185 


215 












353 


io7 


554 


759 


978 


1,017 


835 


182 


31 


♦22 




352 


97 


319 


1,010 


1,193 


1,268 


426 


101 








200 


156 


215 


523 


506 


823 


309 


108 








240 




195 


534 


511 


542 


356 


74 








170 




155 


285 


496 


519 


290 


24 








252 


'54 


235 


635 


433 


595 


319 


90 




• ■a 




95 




119 




214 


294 








. — 












232 


292 


218 


















167 


133 


133 






144 


110 


5,611 


245 


5,145 


8,545 


16,503 


10,501 


9,191 




835 






151 




137 


1,002 


975 


241 


130 










446 


205 


302 


2,578 


807 


620 


328 










355 




194 


823 


732 


506 


212 










82 




153 


432 


522 


300 


149 










602 




501 


1,104 


1,487 


850 


964 




29 


*48 




509 




454 


1,104 


1,126 


679 


714 




49 


*96 




488 




420 


970 


1,197 


754 


654 




110 






606 


40 


543 


396 


1,108 


1,109 


488 




446 






397 




502 




1,640 


1,194 


1,185 










492 




401 




1,297 


1,025 


1,054 




86 






182 




396 


136 


1,073 


607 


779 




37 






638 




555 




1,622 


989 


1,004 










507 




437 




2,067 


1,128 


984 




38 














227 


295 


40 




40 






156 




150 




417 




302 


















206 


204 


204 






2,038 




32,719 


10,454 


20,553 


34,112 


72,083 


46,563 


24,976 




27,675 






1,350 




456 


2,304 


2,156 


1,281 


1,037 










579 




541 


2,859 


2,034 


2,296 


832 




i92 


*60 




1,579 


31 


332 


4,431 


1,243 


324 


370 






*338 




4,932 


57 






1,813 


68 








*133 








1,176 


3,1 8i 


3,161 


3,101 


862 






*66 




998 


81 


689 


4,142 


2,484 


2,549 


410 






*135 




752 




717 


2,108 
880 


3,725 


989 


443 




2 


*125 








368 


1,264 


1,662 


316 






*266 




2,001 


25 




1,623 


4,430 


1,299 


1,214 






*17 




968 




658 


1,944 


2,805 


2,690 


975 












4,088 


321 


1,830 


2,266 


1,522 


511 












2,388 


486 


1,471 


1,811 


1,315 


453 






*898 




18,361 


1,482 


14,783 


7,079 


41,051 


25,688 


17,185 




24,415 






1,199 


2,302 


26 


260 


1,840 


1,779 


368 




3,066 


296 


49 


15,908 


696 


11,887 


16,858 


46,660 


29,969 


24,315 


1,258 


690 


*55 




840 




388 


1,669 


1,933 


363 


267 


100 


15 






630 


20 


397 


1,354 


1,675 


413 


180 


111 


20 


*73 




354 




295 


1,039 


1,744 


282 


186 


55 








282 


'44 


174 


613 


1,036 


475 


160 


64 


20 


t38 




233 


122 


418 


832 


1,984 


503 


110 


65 


44 


tl9 




614 


28 


305 


1,399 


1,968 


419 


169 


58 


10 






238 




67 


554 


737 


119 


72 


107 








376 


'24 


162 


875 


919 


206 


121 


67 








832 


240 


419 


1,867 


2,137 


281 


264 


136 


21 






316 


23 


216 


880 


775 


143 


49 


55 


11 






736 




315 


1,515 


1.671 


164 


157 


54 


20 






727 


112 


332 


2,037 


2,325 


291 


155 


102 


26 






354 




263 


501 


1.214 


875 


678 


57 


76 


t42 




542 


20 


385 


466 


1,720 


843 


667 


123 








281 




246 


209 


838 


750 


556 


39 


*42 






761 


'49 


528 


893 


2,004 


1,279 


1,193 


DO 


51 






501 




420 




1,246 


1,284 


1,023 




23 


*31 




359 




320 




1,060 


1,174 


914 




31 


*38 




418 




421 




1,280 


1,295 


1.147 










490 




457 




1,513 


1,596 


1,130 










434 


i4 


391 




1.314 


1,234 


1 240 




20 






449 




404 




987 


960 


B68 




18 






372 




304 




1,406 


1,920 


1,325 




33 






525 




402 




1.1S>< 


1,167 


1,001 










411 




370 




1,063 


1.102 


1.026 




14 






455 




418 




1.310 


1.366 


1.254 




19 






464 




418 




1,374 


1,483 


1.172 




25 






511 




500 




1,477 


1,511 


1.420 




20 



290 Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 

TABLE XXII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Including Duplicates: 



Total 
Enroll- 
ment 


English 


Social 
Studies 


r 

Science 


Mathe- 
matics 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


1 235 


2 359 


1 214 




1 213 


1 215 




166 


163 


1581 


2988 


1548 


1 704 


1351 


59 


186 


111 


1 433 


2784 


1415 


1 412 


1 418 




105 


145 


1 277 


9 *}£Q 
4 ,00 J 


1 254 


1 244 


1 244 




90 


97 


1045 


1 821 


1030 


1020 


927 




89 


95 


1,933 


2,793 


1,905 


1,725 


1,445 


37 


392 


2 


629 


678 


574 


513 


393 


37 


176 


2 


765 


1 135 


792 


673 


514 




81 




372 


£47 
04 1 


372 


372 


372 




135 




167 


333 


167 


167 


166 








2 067 


3 131 


2 1 90 


1 697 


1 423 


146 


412 


76 


621 


801 


720 


464 


341 


101 


89 




376 


444 


381 


283 


143 


45 




76 


481 

481 


722 


500 


361 


350 




124 




151 


302 


151 


151 


151 




68 




1 70 

i <u 


340 


170 


170 


170 




67 




78 
/ 8 


141 


78 


78 


78 








131 


263 


131 


131 


131 




*64 




59 


118 


59 


59 


59 








5 455 


6 064 


5 744 


4 646 


4 036 




881 


41 


438 


447 


439 


302 


275 




71 




Q18 

yoa 


000 

yyy 


1 ,U10 


708 


406 




300 


41 


44ft 
44U 


479 
114 


4*20 

4oy 


416 


359 








680 


1 003 


91 1 


600 


547 




96 




i ss 


i ifi 

100 


155 


144 


118 




16 




867 


943 


918 


656 


609 




138 




471 


567 


443 


398 


315 




91 




1 148 
1,143 


1,100 


1 120 


1 122 


1 109 




92 




1 94 


1 4ft 
14U 


1 94 
1-4 


1 94 
li4 


124 








on 

04 


89 


S9 
8.2 


89 

04 


82 








09 


09 


08 
ya 


94 


92 








4 381 


4 394 


4 264 


3 730 


3,197 


52 


180 


171 


000 


££■} 

000 


550 


430 


265 


19 


89 




ooy 


err 
000 


11 7 
Ol / 


461 


394 




54 




121 


121 


121 


121 


98 








801 


814 


788 


668 


597 


'is 




47 


839 


839 


902 


744 
1 44 


£94 
0<s4 






124 


R9ft 


601 


HOft 

oyu 


541 


454 


15 


37 




796 


801 


"OR 


7£1 
1 00 


7Rt 
/ 00 








0,0UO 


4 1 SI 
4,101 


o.ouo 


3 122 


2 792 


131 


441 




1,074 


1,064 


1 001 

i ,uyo 


01 1 

y 1 1 


760 


131 


82 




ISO 


£47 
04/ 


Oil) 


475 


452 




55 




799 


1,007 


592 


581 


538 




111 




812 


854 


846 


723 


633 




193 




64 


128 


85 


64 


41 








91 


118 


y i 


01 

y l 


y i 








105 


105 


105 


1 ftn 

1UO 


1 m 

1UO 








172 


228 


172 


172 


1 79 
1 I 4 








2,925 


3,368 


3,151 


2,55o 


4,406 


1 90 


439 




784 


828 


958 


610 


474 


£9 


227 




545 


544 


564 


463 


*}££ 
OOO 


11 
Ol 


81 




217 


230 


221 


169 


1 Q7 
10 < 


1 £ 
10 






934 


1,155 


963 


866 


831 




131 




356 


422 


356 


356 


356 








62 


135 


62 


A 9 
04 


£9 








27 


54 


27 


27 


97 
4 1 








7,387 


7,931 


7,059 


6,053 


5,148 


494 


902 


88 


l',668 


1,852 


1,660 


1,216 


627 


153 


315 




784 


811 


800 


704 


569 


56 




'88 


220 


223 


222 


221 


199 




39 




700 


758 


666 


609 


490 


52 


65 




743 


759 


495 


636 


520 


50 


53 




590 


656 


582 


442 


358 




86 




747 


744 


721 


577 


563 




133 




535 


539 


522 


419 


516 


'65 


93 




1,400 


1,589 


1,391 


1,229 


1,306 


118 


118 




2,216 


2,644 


2,143 


1,846 


1,747 




184 




810 


852 


695 


662 


663 




94 




1,259 


1,526 


1,301 


1,037 


937 


... 


90 





Local Unit 
Name of High School 



Golden Ring Jr.. . 

Parkville Jr 

Stemmers Run Jr. 
Middle River Jr. . . 
Deep Creek Jr. . . . 



Calvert 

Calvert Sr 

W. Sampson Brooks Sr.-Jr. 

Calvert Jr 

Mt. Harmony Jr 



Caroline 

North Caroline Sr 

Colonel Richardson Sr. 

Lockerman Sr.-Jr 

Greensboro Jr 

Denton Jr 

Preston Jr 

Federalsburg Jr 

Ridgely Jr 



Carroll 

Francis Scott Key Sr. 

Westminster Sr 

Taneytown Sr.-Jr 

Sykesville Sr.-Jr 

Robert Moton Sr.-Jr.. 
North Carroll Sr.-Jr.. 
Mount Airy Sr.-Jr — 

Westminster Jr 

New Windsor Jr 

Elmer Wolfe Jr 

Mount Airy Jr 



Cecil 

Elkton Sr 

Bohemia Manor Sr.-Jr. 
G.W. Carver Sr.-Jr.. . . 

North East Sr.-Jr 

Rising Sun Sr.-Jr 

Perryville Sr.-Jr 

Elkton Jr 



Charles 

LaPlata Sr.-Jr.... 
Bel Alton Sr.-Jr.. 
Pomonkey Sr.-Jr. 
Lackey Sr.-Jr. . . . 

Nanjemoy Jr 

Glasva Jr 

Hughesville Jr. . . 
Malcolm Jr 



Dorchester 

Cambridge Sr 

North Dorchester Sr.-Jr. 
South Dorchester Sr.-Jr. 

Mace's Lane Sr.-Jr 

Cambridge Jr 

Hurlock Elem. II 

Vienna II 



Frederick 

Frederick Sr 

Middletown Sr.-Jr.. 
Emmitsburg Sr.-Jr. 

Linganore Sr.-Jr 

Thurmont Sr.-Jr. . . 
Brunswick Sr.-Jr. . . 
Walkersville Sr.-Jr. 

Elm Street Jr 

West Frederick Jr.. 



Garrett 

Northern Garrett Sr.-Jr. 
Southern Garrett Sr.-Jr. 



Maryland State Department of Education 291 



Each Maryland Public High School: Fall of 1963 



Other 




Industrial Education 






Physical 




Art- 






Foreign 


Agri- 




Home 


Business 


and 




Arts 


Driver 


Special 


Lan- 


culture 






Eco- 


education 


Health 


• 




Education 


Education 


guages 




Arts 


Vocational 


nomics 


! 


Education 




Crafts 










469 




411 




1,229 


1,130 


1,125 




19 






547 




504 




1,586 


1,488 


1,413 




32 






522 




510 




1,457 


1,429 


1,362 




21 






505 




427 




1,443 


1,647 


1,133 




33 






360 




300 


155 


1,047 


777 


781 




26 


1 


79 


407 


67 


572 


956 


1,538 


1,184 


756 


74 




*1 




118 


67 


83 


556 


445 


122 


21 


41 






79 


113 




293 


400 


552 


451 


195 


33 








176 




196 




372 


444 


372 


















169 


167 


168 








203 


752 




642 


1,175 


2,017 


1,795 


1,212 


298 


32 




93 


189 




78 


571 


356 


268 


204 


159 






46 


94 




89 


382 


282 


145 


133 


77 


14 




64 


171 




179 


222 


454 


597 


286 


62 


18 






82 




69 




151 


171 


151 










83 




87 




375 


228 


170 










38 




40 




78 


89 


78 










63 




68 




262 


146 


131 










32 




32 




59 


151 


59 








260 


1,808 


129 


1,552 


3,018 


5,068 


4,416 


1,403 




186 




97 


98 




108 


413 


334 


383 












256 


129 


104 


876 


566 


370 


128 




13 






132 




107 


348 


438 


539 


89 








44 


271 




209 


391 


639 


428 


200 










73 




58 


79 


181 


250 










74 


171 




212 


519 


805 


411 


217 








45 


145 




173 


392 


491 


524 












529 




484 




1,316 


1,126 


631 




173 






133 




57 




123 


174 
















40 




82 


101 


'42 


















93 


110 


96 








142 


1,387 




960 


2,535 


3,529 


1,388 


788 


462 


251 






323 




87 


786 


357 


105 


94 


222 






83 


117 




99 


372 


448 


114 


112 


25 


64 






52 




39 


38 


121 


127 




20 








221 




159 


529 


560 


180 


128 


127 


80 




59 


270 




246 


450 


805 


248 


185 


37 








189 




143 


360 


456 


377 


106 


31 


76 






215 




187 




782 


237 


163 




31 




260 


672 


69 


840 


1,481 


3,000 


2,002 


562 




93 




66 


135 




241 


598 


1,142 


678 


191 








62 


84 




91 


118 


372 


253 










82 


275 


69 


218 


281 


518 


398 


250 




93 






91 




150 


484 


424 


309 


85 


















85 


78 




















89 


116 


36 








50 






'55 




105 


18 












'87 




85 




265 


152 










98 


607 




815 


1,305 


2,539 


1,866 


874 


60 


14 






135 




157 


641 


694 


281 


202 


25 


14 




38 


152 




174 


335 


363 


361 












109 




83 


138 


179 




87 








60 


211 




215 


191 


777 


62 i 


140 


35 












186 




356 


412 


356 


















116 


164 


62 


















54 


27 


27 








356 


2,259 




2,043 


3,660 


7,205 


4,636 


2,824 


836 


87 




92 


385 




311 


1,658 


986 


298 


323 


235 






54 


175 




131 


364 


626 


682 


324 


132 








127 




93 




222 


268 


141 


38 






iio 


235 




205 


337 


1,727 


480 


379 


86 


'20 




47 


286 




247 


444 


621 


683 


411 


138 








64 




79 


512 


451 


241 


109 


95 






*53 


112 




156 


345 


651 


456 


198 


112 


16 






173 




164 




520 


643 


385 




19 






702 




657 




1,401 


885 


554 




32 




250 


559 




658 


939 


1,578 


1,440 


614 


340 






150 


263 




295 


295 


590 


652 


161 


138 






100 


296 




363 


644 


841 


788 


306 


202 





292 Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 

TABLE XXII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Including Duplicates; 



Total 




Social 




Mathe- 








Enroll- 


English 


Studies 


Science 


matics 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


ment 












28 


28 


28 


28 


28 








60 


120 


60 


60 


60 








59 


118 


59 


59 


59 








8,597 


9,266 


8,578 


7,469 


6,746 


471 


1,491 


462 


1,722 


1,908 


1,620 


1,356 


1,136 


146 


415 


286 


1,373 


1,564 


1,558 


1,218 


1,103 


83 


209 




1,701 


1,750 


1,728 


1,519 


1,343 


107 


490 


176 


334 


404 


318 


287 


235 




71 




416 


431 


413 


408 


379 




44 




1,118 


1,258 


1,030 


967 


911 


93 


76 




1,022 


1,048 


1,034 


837 


775 


42 


186 




911 


903 


877 


877 


864 








4,435 


5,186 


4,481 


3,961 


3,355 


151 


1,091 


303 


1,211 


1,386 


1,311 


894 


610 


79 


222 


151 


1,035 


1,165 


1,020 


1,040 


725 


72 


244 




445 


495 


455 


326 


319 




34 




609 


690 


569 


576 


580 




176 




738 


791 


727 


728 


724 




181 


152 


150 


354 


152 


150 


150 




96 




247 


305 


247 


247 


247 




138 




1,475 


1,606 


1,446 


1,215 


1,165 


72 


232 




240 


285 


228 


190 


179 


10 


28 




638 


649 


624 


501 


520 


62 


119 




380 


405 


349 


336 


294 




54 




217 


267 


245 


188 


172 




31 




41,036 


49,011 


36,379 


29,047 


32,642 


1,946 


15,896 


2,777 


1,762 


1,879 


1,345 


1,192 


933 


161 


474 


138 


2,036 


2,430 


1,653 


1,459 


1,293 


113 


820 


346 


2,024 


2,260 


1,531 


1,465 


1,325 


169 


807 


323 


l',608 


1,814 


1,176 


1,263 


1,102 


140 


707 


308 


935 


1,043 


762 


639 


368 


97 


113 


114 


2,678 


3,071 


2,220 


1,748 


1,514 


94 


751 


400 


2*150 


2,273 


1,523 


1,420 


1,245 


95 


422 


278 


1*200 


1*369 


922 


948 


734 


78 


326 


184 


L947 


2,206 


1,601 


1,493 


1,149 


112 


641 


240 


496 


587 


410 


265 


343 


20 


99 




110 
















1,216 


1.489 


902 


923 


75i 


74 


43i 


205 


1*281 


1,570 


1,147 


763 


801 


54 


357 


116 


695 


894 


610 


431 


532 




248 




1,114 


1,248 


895 


801 


824 


126 


246 


125 


967 


1 656 


1 028 


551 


1,038 




492 




1,269 


L435 


1,227 
699 


872 


1,247 


'60 


306 




731 


901 


362 


724 




229 




1 128 


1,556 


1,140 


1,116 


1,115 


*42 


584 




934 


934 


935 


*484 


936 


24 


550 




989 


1,378 


1,001 


835 


985 


34 


539 




1 456 


1 541 


1,454 


727 


1,456 


43 


831 




1408 


1*659 


1^408 


1,404 


L408 


77 


983 




1 190 


1'2 85 


1,138 
916 


661 


1,137 


26 


311 




921 


1,151 


615 


921 


33 


374 




1 081 


1,368 


1,086 


654 


1,095 


26 


409 




1197 


1,915 


1*197 


1,197 


1*197 


49 


896 




1241 


1593 


1 '2 1 6 


l'o86 


1,216 


59 


684 




1681 


2201 


1,675 


823 


L673 


48 


844 




1 582 


1828 


1587 


1,025 


1*582 


54 


662 




1,297 


L302 


1,'258 


Mil 


1,273 


38 


502 




712 


1,175 


717 


714 


725 




258 




39,247 


44,843 


24,448 


18,815 


29,894 


908 


3,520 


3,645 


2,278 


2,627 


2,108 


1,403 


1,172 


121 


463 


390 


2,001 


2,426 


1,448 


1,252 


806 


74 


304 


205 


1,868 


2,125 


2,411 


1,124 


689 


97 


332 


346 


1,209 


1,388 


1,423 


947 


777 


102 


272 


246 


472 


551 


510 


329 


227 




139 


72 


1,635 


1,883 


1,496 


1,205 


980 


'99 


256 


403 


2,167 


2,499 


2,053 


1,492 


1,190 


169 


332 


471 


2,639 


3,053 


2,713 


1,571 


1,404 


164 


479 


569 


882 


1,043 


797 


547 


348 


42 


102 


70 


721 


782 


452 


365 


522 






149 


699 


757 


486 


372 


504 




ii7 


38 


914 


1,007 


507 


769 


642 


'46 


160 


172 



Local Unit 
Name of High School 



Bloomington (Elem. and 7-8) 

Route 40 (Elem. and 7-8) 

Kitzmiller (Elem. and 7-8) 

Harford 

Bel Air Sr 

Edgewood Sr.-Jr 

Aberdeen Sr.-Jr 

Havre de Grace Consolidated Sr 

Jr 

Central Consolidated Sr.-Jr 

North Harford Sr.-Jr 

Havre de Grace Sr.-Jr 

Bel Air Jr 

Howard 

Howard Sr 

Glenelg Sr.-Jr 

Harriet Tubman Sr.-Jr 

Waterloo Jr 

Ellicott City Jr 

Rockland Jr 

Clarksville Jr 

Kent 

Galena Sr.-Jr 

Chestertown Sr.-Jr 

Garnett Sr.-Jr 

Rock Hall Sr.-Jr 

Montgomery 

Richard Montgomery Sr 

Walter Johnson Sr 

Bethesda-Chevy Chase Sr 

Walt Whitman Sr 

Gaithersburg Sr 

Montgomery Blair Sr 

Wheaton Sr 

Albert Einstein Sr 

Northwood Sr 

Poolesville Sr.-Jr 

Rock Terrace Sr.-Jr , 

Springbrook Sr.-Jr 

Sherwood Sr.-Jr 

Damascus Sr.-Jr 

Robert E. Peary Sr.-Jr 

West Rockville Jr 

Edwin W. Broome Jr 

Randolph Jr 

White Oak Jr 

Leland Jr 

Western Jr 

North Bethesda Jr 

Thomas W. Pyle Jr 

Gaithersburg Jr 

Takoma Park Jr 

Montgomery Hills Jr 

Kensington Jr 

Eastern Jr 

Sligo Jr 

Col. Joseph Belt Jr 

Newport Jr 

Parkland Jr 

Prince George's 

High Point Sr 

Bladensburg Sr 

Suitland Sr 

Surrattsville Sr 

Laurel Sr 

Oxon Hill Sr 

DuVal Sr 

Northwestern Sr , 

Central Sr 

Frederick Sasscer Sr.-Jr , 

Gwynn Park Sr.-Jr , 

Crossland Sr.-Jr , 



Maryland State Department of Education 293 



Each Maryland Public High School: Fall of 1963 



Other 




Industrial Education 






Physical 




Art- 






Foreign 


Agri- 






Home 


Business 


and 




Arts 


Driver 


Special 




culture 






Eco- 


Education 


Health 


Music 




Kducation 


Education 


guages 




Arts 


Vocational 


nomics 




Education 




Crafts 


















28 




28 


















60 




60 


















59 




59 








175 


2,209 


236 


1,827 


4,047 


5,770 


4,293 


3,264 


703 


219 




67 


482 


• ■ • 


293 


1,386 


766 


325 


264 


156 


25 






198 


140 


227 


532 


922 


634 


335 


63 








404 




295 


834 


1,266 


749 


502 


195 








116 




107 


174 


230 


204 


189 


33 


20 






119 




118 


87 


405 


320 


408 


81 






108 


233 


• ■ ■ 


157 


461 


640 


624 


167 


35 


31 






199 


96 


225 


573 


631 


467 


520 


140 


15 






458 




405 




910 


970 


879 




128 




82 


1,642 


95 


1,205 


1,989 


3,493 


2,352 


831 




300 






358 


• • • 


245 


1,152 


467 


264 


169 








'82 


553 


1 1 


303 


710 


713 


342 


192 










129 


78 


134 


127 


280 


284 






85 






233 




189 




826 


434 


258 




155 






236 




220 




756 


485 


212 




60 














204 


210 












loo 




iii 




247 


333 










99 


446 




466 


624 


1,421 


1,162 


218 


188 


119 






99 




85 


108 


238 


268 




34 


12 




'79 


187 




143 


283 


626 


289 




80 


87 




20 


94 




149 


131 


343 


408 


2i8 


47 


20 






66 




89 


102 


214 


197 




27 




595 


196 


10,905 




6,873 


11,665 


31,763 


12,743 


8,546 


3,419 


1,816 






394 


148 


216 


1,424 


1,097 


407 


211 


234 




*122 




509 


31 


259 


479 


1,361 


644 


441 


243 




*108 




470 


-0 


118 


769 


1,492 
962 


449 


308 


376 




*56 




471 




143 


605 


425 


229 








68 


171 


CO 

o» 


90 


893 


513 


270 


111 


239 




*ioi 




755 


1 66 


364 


1,713 


1,162 


409 


532 


376 




*77 




522 


536 


307 


1,339 


672 


488 


231 


469 


i20 


*62 




421 




122 


736 


760 


269 


122 


329 




*69 




715 




176 


1,085 


1,140 


507 


397 


549 






52 


92 




108 


234 


277 


102 


128 


32 


164 






■ ■ ■ 
o/9 


• ■ ■ 
ol 


i25 


596 


789 


224 


160 


129 


713 






311 




165 


380 


1.030 


391 


286 


101 


352 




76 


222 


■ • • 


190 


238 


590 


199 


186 


35 


61 






340 


16 


145 


558 


387 


232 


199 


230 








208 




205 




983 


407 


226 










356 




248 




1,240 


435 


266 




52 






260 




208 




891 


546 


582 




10 






301 




255 




1,121 


657 


292 










154 




201 


116 


911 


735 


329 










238 




186 


151 


981 


584 


378 










284 




277 


158 


1,443 


453 


236 










357 




329 




1,407 


447 


328 










399 




276 




1,440 


528 


392 




54 






231 




221 




872 


347 


206 










291 




254 




1,014 


328 


233 










219 




194 


191 


1,189 


425 


245 










418 




339 




1,193 


421 


314 




84 






594 




469 




1,613 


438 


296 




36 






290 




247 




1,037 


335 


228 










340 




267 




1,336 


383 


274 




170 






193 




169 




860 


258 


180 






400 


358 


13,093 


1,991 


11,729 


15,231 


34,652 


16,393 


12,883 


1,235 


391 


*t241 




568 




426 


2,009 


1,398 


408 


287 


100 




*65 




319 




305 


1,829 


1,184 


337 


272 


111 




n 




379 


1,182 


233 


1,925 


900 


335 


340 


84 








242 




156 


814 


556 


202 


211 


120 








85 




81 


472 


258 


66 


55 


48 








331 




200 


1,408 


917 


238 


178 






*85 




420 




336 


1,770 


1,479 


334 


272 


124 








452 




394 


1,931 


1,189 


389 


285 


119 








130 




173 


1,028 


666 


139 


117 


146 






86 


208 




110 


412 


637 


328 


199 


36 






87 


182 




155 


337 


554 


334 


284 


36 








337 




197 


429 


784 


265 


152 


119 





294 Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 

TABLE XXII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Including Duplicates: 



Local Unit 


Total 




Social 




Mathe- 








— 


Enroll- 


English 


Studies 


Science 


matics 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


Name of High School 


ment 














1,165 


1,246 


732 


565 


857 






104 




1,379 


1,468 


1,289 


1,012 


916 




175 


158 


Beltsville Jr 


810 


871 


253 


252 


808 




21 






1,122 


1,186 


379 


379 


1,122 




64 






548 


640 


152 


152 


528 




23 






863 


926 


244 


245 


832 






"l9 




861 


1,085 


514 


297 


755 








Francis Scott Key Jr 


1,026 


1,184 


307 


307 


1,017 




'21 




Roger B. Taney Jr 


1,014 


1,138 


331 


328 


1,015 




30 


20 


Surrattsville Jr 


662 


746 


202 


202 


641 




13 


6 




656 


776 


223 


222 


643 




18 




Oxon Hill Jr 


660 


660 


235 


235 


660 




32 


'l5 




842 


948 


264 


263 


838 




34 


23 


Kent Jr 


779 


938 


223 


223 


779 








Belair Jr 


624 


655 


184 


183 


612 




'34 


34 




816 


867 


295 


295 


824 










825 


950 


307 


308 


833 






37 


Rollingcrest Jr 


646 


718 


258 


290 


646 




'25 






638 


891 


216 


216 


608 




19 


'is 




901 


984 


1 OK 


loo 


868 








Mary M. Bethune Jr 


923 


998 






896 










1,123 


1,340 


386 


386 


1,123 






'66 


Charles Carroll Jr 


1,127 


1,080 


331 


331 


1,130 




'ii> 


14 




950 


984 


310 


310 


932 




12 




Buck Lodge Jr 


802 


1,423 


224 


253 


750 




24 






1,756 


1,879 


1,738 


1,452 


1,319 




232 






335 


367 


289 


244 


211 




48 






563 


641 


540 


513 


440 




98 






495 


495 


495 


397 


400 




65 




Stevensville Sr.-Jr 


363 


376 


414 


298 


268 




21 






2,923 


2,969 


2,863 


2,483 


2,140 


37 


344 


208 


_i a/: 11-, o, 


ooo 


io6 


o»o 


o/u 




o 1 


1 49 


1 KO 
1 04 




588 


606 


630 


487 


424 




122 






449 


441 


431 


371 


293 




27 






469 


456 


479 


371 


328 






'56 


George Washington Carver Sr.-Jr 


308 


287 


301 


258 


229 




53 




Esperanza Jr 


446 


426 


426 


426 


426 










1,987 


2,034 


2,194 


1,733 


1,660 




505 




Washington Sr.-Jr 


432 


437 


512 


369 


352 




138 






128 


130 


1 1 1 

161 


ll i 


1 no 

WO 




Q 

V 






448 


453 


546 


356 


349 




110 






247 


247 


258 


229 


210 




34 




Deal Island Sr.-Jr 


113 


113 


160 


113 


93 










589 


501 


557 


519 


518 




214 




•ni „11 T» 


30 


60 


QO 


ol) 


QO 










1,923 


2,252 


1,930 


1,777 


1,520 


66 


311 




Easton Sr.-Jr 


1,004 


1,213 


1,005 


882 


783 


66 


172 






509 


625 


513 


516 


478 




61 




St. Michaels Sr.-Jr 


410 


414 


412 


379 


259 




78 






9,682 


10,496 


9,306 


7,500 


6,479 


627 


737 


1,611 


South Hagerstown Sr 


1,895 


2,045 


2,041 


1,310 


927 


173 


225 


166 




316 


326 


230 


190 


166 




40 






803 


882 


698 


653 


395 


108 


106 




North Hagerstown Sr 


2,212 


2,525 


1,935 


1,479 


1,435 


183 


297 


32i 




647 


775 


661 


493 


394 


69 


19 


43 




556 


562 


636 


389 


355 


59 


22 


35 




0/0 


801 


O/l 


01 1 


ova 


35 


28 


65 


Hancock Int. (Jr.) 


157 


242 


121 


138 


121 






66 




452 


418 


418 


418 


418 






35 




745 


640 


608 


639 


567 






110 




764 


729 


729 


730 


729 






250 




560 


551 


658 


550 


580 






520 




4,875 


6.052 


5,108 


4,146 


3,745 


229 


904 


1.127 




1 ,139 


1,263 


1 '}99 
1 ,OZ J 


ROC 


oyu 


34 


114 


314 


Mardela Sr.-Jr 


315 


428 


349 


294 


240 




109 




Pittsville Sr.-Jr 


278 


336 


318 


237 


183 




97 




Salisbury Sr.-Jr 


1,252 


1,898 


1,322 


1,092 


927 




252 


696 


James M. Bennett Sr.-Jr 


708 


865 


678 


698 


607 


105 


165 


117 


Wicomico Jr 


1,183 


1,262 


1,119 


1,137 


1,198 


90 


168 




Worcester 


2,575 


2,548 


2,620 


2,292 


2,047 




835 






415 


433 


430 


384 


355 




167 




Snow Hill Sr.-Jr 


456 


458 


486 


403 


366 




186 






754 


763 


761 


662 


592 




234 






950 


894 


943 


843 


734 




248 





* Includes the following number taking German: Allegany: Allegany Sr.-Jr. — 22; Anne Arundel: Andover Sr.- 
Jr. — 96, Brooklyn Park Sr.-Jr. — 48; Baltimore City: City College — 266, Eastern — 133, Edmondson — 60, Forest 
Park — 135, Frederick Douglass — 17, Patterson — 66, Polytechnic — 338, Western — 125, Junior Highs — 898; Baltimore: 
Milford Mill Sr.— 73, Woodlawn Sr.— 55, Johnnycake Jr.— 31, Woodlawn Jr.— 38; Calvert: Calvert Sr.— 1; Mont- 
gomery: Albert Einstein Sr.— 62, Bethesda-Chevy Chase Sr.— 108; Montgomery Blair Sr.— 101, Norwood Sr.— 69, 
Walt Whitman Sr. — 56, Walter Johnson Sr. — 122, Wheaton Sr. — 77; Prince George's: Bladensburg Sr.— 65, DuVal 
Sr. — 85, High Point Sr. — 231; Washington: North Hagerstown Sr.— 32, South Hagerstown Sr. — 45. 

t Includes the following number taking Russian: Baltimore: Parkville Sr. — 19, Ridgely Jr.-Dulaney Sr. — 42, 
Towson Sr.— 38; Prince George's: High Point Sr.— 10, Suitland Sr.— 9. 



Maryland State Department of Education 
Each Maryland Public High School: Fall of 1963 



295 



Other 
Foreign 
Lan- 
guages 


Agri- 
culture 


Industrial Education 


Home 
Eco- 
nomics 


Business 
Education 


Physical 

and 
Health 
Education 


Arts 


Vocational 




158 


316 




41 7 
41 1 


265 


1,738 




121 


809 


0R8 
ZOO 


602 


918 






409 




381 




789 






490 




496 




1,016 






244 




Oil 
£16 




540 






380 




000 




837 






394 




396 




852 






498 




420 




1,038 






449 




398 




1014 






160 




149 




'631 






334 




283 




841 






211 




241 




646 






406 




392 




826 






409 




o/u 




1,534 






291 
408 




257 




621 








401 




758 






407 




375 




800 






291 




0R4 
Z04 




612 






326 




280 




560 






419 




0/0 




1,099 




'28 


468 




407 




908 




391 




374 




1,108 






756 
468 




615 




1,484 








450 




2,178 






394 




369 




782 




226 
99 


444 




677 


799 


1,500 






fifi 

80 


232 


238 




52 


171 




0f»7 


232 


431 




75 


229 




289 


201 


495 




44 




95 


134 


336 




121 


1 025 




. 

So L 


1 04E. 

I ._ 40 


2 506 




' 94 




59 


452 


009 






174 




1 9 E 

loo 


307 


391 




69 


187 




184 


1 19 


423 




52 


166 




150 


OAQ 

zoo 


488 




153 




109 


104 


399 






251 




195 




446 






136 




390 


600 


961 






67 






132 


212 












99 










163 


194 


305 










121 


124 


86 














83 






69 




1 flA 
1UO 


150 


176 




110 
59 


395 




005 


921 


1,394 




195 




154 


eo e 
OoO 


717 




51 


103 




119 


91 


258 




97 




DR 

yo 


295 


419 


77 


374 


3,333 


142 


2, (04 


0,011 


9 136 


*45 


77 


427 


72 


404 


1 248 


881 


112 
190 




104 


01 9. 
410 


347 




iio 






397 


423 


*32 


719 


70 


537 


834 


1,457 


97 


191 




1 E9 
100 


335 


559 






93 




93 


•j on 

Oil) 


731 




'90 


252 




74 
1 4 


194 


369 




84 




73 




199 






221 




OQ1 




819 






388 




357 




745 






374 




401 




1,493 






282 




277 




1,113 




154 
60 


1,368 


58 


1,143 




2 839 




227 
98 


58 


105 


1,096 


347 




34 




103 


1 so 

109 


345 




132 




101 


140 


276 




48 


326 




317 


430 


122 




215 




169 


397 


615 




"\2 


370 




348 




1,134 




143 


730 




670 


971 


1,786 




110 




80 


180 


322 




38 


121 




150 


206 


319 




46 


281 




220 


395 


491 




59 


218 




220 


190 


654 



Music 


Art- 
Arts 
and 

Crafts 


Driver 
Education 


Special 
Education 


568 


401 
4Z 1 


01 


31 


1 C4 
184 


222 


141 




540 


94 Q 
045 






1,003 


726 






306 


231 




20 


761 


689 




25 


313 


OOO 






461 


401 




9 


460 


909 

oao 






539 


261 




132 


644 


K1 4 
Oil 




17 


336 


1 9fl 
10U 






RH4 
0U4 


315 




8 


413 


204 






302 


990 
009 




io 


559 


353 






511 


344 






410 


296 






371 


281 




34 


513 


346 




33 


858 


814 




28 


742 


606 






677 


698 






539 


99Q 
009 




18 


404 


OQ7 




14 


1,198 


OOfi 


401 




429 


4Q 
49 


102 




304 


1 9.1 
101 


170 




371 




91 




94 


'46 


38 




l,9oo 


1 452 


185 


81 


111 


i nd 

1U1 


24 




371 


014 

ill 


26 




997 
00 / 


221 


48 


20 


97E 

0(0 


242 


31 


21 


07R 


225 


56 


20 


463 


446 




20 


1,833 


1 1 4£ 
1 , 1 10 


23 




395 


336 






128 


25 


23 




359 


270 






239 


123 






113 


• • • 






569 


391 






30 








1,124 




0f\4 
ZU4 




376 




184 




370 




20 




378 








5,719 


2,Slo 


9fi4 
OOl 


529 


430 


184 


96 


75 


174 






20 


217 


ioo 


'48 


20 


575 


202 


152 


37 


382 


1 fid 

ISO 


20 


173 


275 


233 


24 


17 


376 




04 




170 


• ■ ■ 




36 


589 


446 




34 


774 


740 




40 


1,119 


389 




35 


638 


337 




42 


2,4*6 


l,8os 


Oi 


66 


146 


90 


•100 


12 


170 


160 


KB 
OS 




175 


172 


40 




842 


638 


193 


28 


457 


277 


250 


12 


686 


501 




14 


1,381 


601 


169 


58 


242 


118 


72 




292 


133 


20 




351 


107 


40 


'58 


496 


243 


37 



Index 



297 



INDEX 



A 

Academic course, each high school, 280-287 
Accreditation and certification, division of, 

82-87 
Administration 

Cost per pupil, 212 

Expenditures, 268-269, 275 

Per cent for, 206-209 

Superintendents, 2, 7-24, 252 
Administration and finance, division of, 88-90 
Adult Education 

Expenditures, 231, 233, 248, 270 

General, 234-235 

Vocational, 236-237 
Agriculture 

Adult education, 231, 236-237 

Enrollment, 143, 154 

Each high school, 288-295 

Federal aid, 231, 238 

Schools offering, 168, 288-295 

Teachers, 168 
Aid from State and/or Federal funds (see 

State aid and Federal aid) 
Aid per classroom, 248, 265 
Aid per pupil, 248, 265 
Appropriations 

Local, 203-205, 226, 267 

State, 203-205, 248, 265, 267 

Federal, 203-205, 248, 266, 267 
Area Redevelopment Act, 230, 248, 266 
Art 

Enrollment, 143, 166 

Each high school, 288-295 

Schools offering, 168, 288-295 

Teachers, 168 
Assessable basis, 224, 227-229 
Attendance 

Average daily, 251 

Per cent of, 251 

Teachers at summer school and work- 
shops, 177 
Workers (see Pupil personnel) 



B 

Bands, orchestras, chorus, 164-165 

Belonging, average number, 251 
Per teacher and principal, 169 

Births, resident, 110 

Board of Education, State, 2 

Bonded indebtedness, 224-225 

Books and instructional materials, 270-271 

Boys and girls 

Each high school, 280-287 
Graduates, high school, 124-142 
Nonpromotions in first grade, 123 
Number of different pupils, 250 

Budget 

Appropriations, State Department of 
Education, 248 

Local appropriations, 226 
Buildings (see Capital outlay) 
Business education 

Adult, 234-235 

Enrollment, 143, 160-161, 234-235 

Each high school, 288-295 
Schools offering, 168, 288-295 
Teachers, 168 



c 

Capital outlay, school, 203, 222, 226, 268, 278 

By site, building, equipment, 278 
Certificate status, teachers, 182-184 
Chorus, bands, orchestras, 164-165 



C— (Continued) 

Certification and accreditation, division of, 
82-87 

Civil Defense adult education, 230, 234, 266 

Clerks, 252-255 

Colleges 

Community and junior college enroll- 
ments, 239 
Graduates qualifying for teaching cer- 
tificates, 176 
High school graduates of 1963 entering, 

134-142 
State, 134-139 
Commercial course, each high school, 280-287 

(See also Business education) 
Community colleges, 206-207, 239, 265 
Community services, 206-207, 269, 277 
Contents, table of, 25 

Contracted services, expenditures, 270-276 
Cost per pupil, 210-211 

By function, 212 

Transported, 216 
Costs (see Expenditures) 

County superintendents, directors, super- 
visors, 7-24 
Courses in individual high schools, 280-287 
Crippled children, services for, 111-117, 119 
Current expenses 

Amount and per cent by source, 203-205 
Cost per pupil, 210-211 
Per cent distribution by function, 
206-209 



D 

Dates, opening and closing of schools, 99 
Days in session, 99 
Debt service, 203, 224-226, 268, 279 
Departments of education, State and local, 
2-24 

Disbursements (see Expenditures) 
Distributive education, 159, 231, 236-238 
Driver education and training, high school 

Enrollment, 143, 167 

Each high school, 288-295 

Schools offering, 168 

State aid, 248, 265 

Teachers, 168 



E 

Elementary schools 

Disbursements for instruction, 271 

Instructional personnel, 254 

Number of, 101, 249 
Emergency certificates, 182-184 
Employment of high school graduates, 

125-128, 131-133 
English, high school 

Enrollment, 143-145 

Each high school, 288-295 

Schools offering, 168, 2^8-295 

Teachers, 168 
Enrollment 

Adult, 234-236 

Campus schools. State colleges, 104, 106 
Elementary, 100-109, 250, 256-264 
Grade or year, 102, 104-109 
Handicapped children, 111-117, 119 
High school, 100-101, 250, 256-264 
Course, each school, 280-287 
Grade, 102, 104-109 

Each school. 280-287 
Subjects. 143-167 

Each school, 288-295 
Nonpublic, private and parochial, 
100-101, 104, 107-109, 256-264 



298 



Index 



E— (Continued) 

Public, 100-105, 250 
Subject, 143-167 

Each school, 288-295 
Summary, 100-101, 104 
Equalization fund, 203-205, 248, 265 
Equivalence high school, 232 
Evening schools and courses 
Enrollment, 234-236 
Expenditures, 231, 233, 270 
Expenditures 

(see also Administration, Capital out- 
lay, Community colleges, Community 
services, Debt service, Fixed charges, 
Food services, Health services, Instruc- 
tion, Maintenance, Operation, Pupil 
personnel, Student body activities, 
Transportation) 
Adult education, 231, 233, 270 
Contracted services, 270-276 
Libraries, local, 244-245 
Other charges, 270-276 
Rehabilitation, 241, 246-248 
Salaries, 270-276 

Vocational, 231, 233, 238 
School library books, 270-271 
Supplies and materials, 270-276 
Textbooks, 270-271 

Total, by major functions, 248, 268-269 
Vocational, Federal, 231, 238 
Experience of teachers, 186-197 



F 

Failures (see Nonpromotions) 

Fall enrollment, 100, 102-109 

Federal aid 

Libraries, 244 

Schools, 203-205, 230, 266 

Vocational education, 230-231, 238 

Administration and supervision, 231 
Salaries of teachers, 231, 238 

Financial statements 

State department headquarters, 246-247 
State public schools, 248, 265-279 
Vocational Rehabilitation, 246-247 

First grade nonpromotions, 123 

Fixed charges, 206-209, 269, 275 

Follow-up of graduates, 125-142 

Food services, 206-207, 269, 276 

French, adult, 234 

French, high school 

Enrollment, 143, 152 

Each high school, 288-295 
Schools offering, 168, 288-295 
Teachers, 168 



G 

General course, each high school, 280-287 
German, 153 (see French for other refer- 
ences) 

Grade enrollment, 102, 104-109 

Graduates 

High school, 124-142 

Entering State colleges, 134-139 
From each school, 280-287 
Occupations of, 125-127, 131-133 

Guidance, teachers of, 168, 253-255 



H 

Handicapped children 

Expenditures, 112, 119, 248 
Home and hospital instruction, 111-112, 
116 

Opportunities for education of, 111-119 
Preschool, 119 



H — (Continued) 

Receipts from State for, 112, 119, 248, 

265 

Health education (see Physical and health 

education) 
Health services, 206-209, 212, 269, 272 
Hearing and speech therapy, 118 
High school equivalence, 232 
High schools 

Disbursements for instruction, 271 

Individual, 280-295 

Instructional personnel, 255 
Home economics 

Adult, 231, 236-238 

Enrollment, 143, 155 

Each high school, 288-295 

Federal aid, 231, 238 

Schools offering, 168, 288-295 

Teachers, 168 
Home and hospital instruction of pupils, 
111-112, 116 

I 

Impacted areas, 266 

Incentive fund, school buildings, 248, 265 
Industrial education (see Trades and in- 
dustries) 
Instruction 

Cost per pupil, 212 
Division of, 57-71 
Expenditures 

Contracted services, 270-271 
Salaries, 270-271 
Supplies and materials, 270-271 
Total, 268 
Per cent of current expenses, 206-209 

J 

Junior colleges, 239, 248, 265, 269, 277 

K 

Kindergartens 

Enrollment, public and nonpublic, 102, 

104-109 
Nonpublic, 256-264 

L 

Languages (see English, French, etc.) 

Latin, 152 (see French for other references) 

Legislation, 27-29 

Length of school session, 99 

Letter of transmittal, 26 

Levies, local, 226 

Librarians _ 

Public, 6-7 

School, 253-255 
Libraries, public 

Circulation and number of volumes, 
244-245 

Income and expenditures, 244-245, 248 

State aided, 6-7 
Libraries, school 

Expenditures for books, 270-271 
Library extension, division of, 72-75 
Library service act, 230 
Local appropriations, 203-205, 226, 267 
Lunch program, school, 206-207, 218, 220-221, 
266, 268 

M 

Maintenance 

Cost per pupil, 212 

Expenditures, 269, 273 

Per cent of current expenses, 206-209 

Personnel, 252 



Index 



299 



M — (Continued) 

Manpower Development Training Act, 230, 
266 

Materials and supplies, expenditures, 270-276 
Mathematics, high school 

Enrollment, 143, 150-151 

Each high school, 288-295 

Schools offering, 168, 288-295 

Teachers. 168 
Medical examinations, bus drivers, 265 
Mentally handicapped children, 111-117, 119 
Milk program, special, 206-207, 219, 266, 268 
Minimum program, State, 202 
Minutes, State Board, 30-56 
Music, high school 

Enrollment, 143, 164-165 

Each high school, 288-295 

Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 164-165 

Schools offering, 288-295 

Teachers, 168 



N 

National Defense Education Act, 230, 248, 266 
Night schools (see Evening schools, Adult 

education) 
Nonpromotions 

Elementary, 122-123 

First grade, 123 

High school, 121 
Nonpublic schools, 100-101, 107-109, 256-264 
Number belonging, average, 251 

Per teacher, 169 
Number of different pupils, 101, 250 
Number of schools 

Nonpublic, 100-101, 256-264 

One-teacher, 170, 249 

Public, 100-101, 249 

Elementary, 100-101, 170, 174-175, 
249 

High, 100-101, 174-175, 249 



o 

Occupations of high school graduates, 

125-127, 131-133 
Office and clerical staff, 252-255 
One-teacher schools 

Number belonging in, 170 

Number of, 170, 249 
Operation 

Cost per pupil, 212 

Expenditures, 269, 273 

Per cent of current expenses, 206-209 

Personnel, 252 
Orchestras, bands, chorus, 164-165 
Other charges, expenditures, 270-276 



P 

Parochial and private schools (see Non- 
public schools) 

Part-payment of salaries, 248, 265 

Payments to adjoining units. 268 

Pensions (see Retirement system for 
teachers) 

Physical and health education, high school 

Enrollment, 143, 162-163 

Each high school, 288-295 

Schools offering, 288-295 

Teachers, 168 
Physical examination, bus drivers, 265 
Physically handicapped children, 111-119 
Positions in local school systems, 252-255 
Preparation, teachers, 178-181 
Preschool handicapped, 119 
Principals and vice-principals, 253-255 



P— (Continued) 

Private and parochial schools, 100-101, 

107-109, 256-264 
Professional and clerical staffs, county, 

252-255 
Property 

Assessed valuation, 227-229 

School, 223 
Provisional certificates, 182-184 
Psychology (see Social studies) 
Pupil personnel 

Cost per pupil, 212 

Local school systems, 7-24 

Number of positions, 252 

Per cent of current expenses, 206-209 

Salaries, 272 

Total expenditures, 269, 272 
Pupils 

Campus schools, State colleges, 106 
Nonpublic, 100-101, 107-109, 256-264 
One-teacher schools, 170 
Per teacher, 169 
Public school 

Enrollment, 100-105, 250 

Number attending, 251 

Number belonging, 251 

Per cent of attendance, 251 
Transported, 216 



R 

Receipts from 

All sources, 203-205, 267 

Federal, 203-205, 266, 267 
Adult education, 233 
Libraries, 230, 244-245 
Teachers salaries, 231, 233 
Vocational education, 231, 233 

Local, 203-205, 226, 267 

State 

Adult education, 233 

Libraries, 244-245, 248 

Schools, 203-205, 265, 267 
Rehabilitation, vocational 

(see Vocational rehabilitation) 
Repair, utility men, janitors (see Operation 

personnel) 
Revenue and nonrevenue receipts, 267 
Research and development, division of, 91-95 
Resident births, 110 
Resignations, teachers, 198-200 
Retarded children, programs for, 111-119 
Retirement systems for teachers, 6, 248, 265 
Russian, 153 (see French for other refer- 
ences) 



S 

Salaries 

Administration, 275 

Contracted services, 274 

Health services, 272 

Instruction, 270-271 

Maintenance and operation, 273 

Pupil personnel, 272 

Teachers, average, 213-215 

Vocational, 231, 233 
School lunch, 206-207, 218, 220-221, 266, 268 
School milk, 206-207, 219, 266, 268 
Schools 

Number of, 100-101, 170, 174-175, 249, 
256-264 
Science, high school 

Enrollment, 143, 148-149 

Each high school, 288-295 
Schools offering, 168, 288-295 
Teachers, 168 
Secretaries and clerks, 252-255 
Session, length of, 99 



300 



Index 



S — (Continued) 

Size of 

Schools 

Each high school, 280-287 
Elementary, 174-175 
High, 174-175 
Teaching staff, 100-101, 174-175, 253-255 
Social security, teachers, 265 
Social studies, high school 
Enrollment, 143, 146-147 

Each high school, 288-295 
Schools offering, 168, 288-295 
Teachers, 168 
Source of funds, current expenses, 203 
Spanish, 153 (see French for other refer- 
ences) 

Special classes for handicapped, 111-115, 119 
Special education enrollment, 143, 167 
Special milk program, 206-207, 219, 266, 268 
Speech and hearing therapy, 118 
State 

Aid to schools, 203-205 

Minimum program, 202 
Showing various funds, 248, 265 

Board of Education, 2 

Excerpts from minutes of, 30-56 

Colleges, 134-139 

Department of Education, 2-6, 246-248 
Teachers' retirement system, 6, 248, 265 
Student body activities, 206-207, 269, 276 
Subjects studied in high schools, 143-167 

Each high school, 288-295 
Summer school attendance, county teachers, 
177 

Superintendents, 2, 7-24, 252 
Supervisors 

Local school systems, 7-24 

Names of, 2-24 

Number of, 252-255 

State, 2-6 

Supplies and materials, expenditures, 270-276 



T 

Table of contents, 25 
Taxable basis, 227-229 

Tax dollar, distribution of school, 206-207 
Teacher(s) 

Average salary, 213-215 

Certification. 82-87, 176, 182-184 

Experience, 186-197 

New, 180-181, 184-185, 192-197, 201 

Number of 
Public 

Elementary and high, 100-101, 

171-173, 253-255 
For each high school subject, 168 
In each high school, 280-287 
Nonpublic, 100-101, 256-264 

Of handicapped children, 113-115, 118 

Preparation, 178-181 

Pupils per, 169 

Resignations, 198-200 

Salaries, average, 213-215 



T— (Continued) 

Social security, 265 

Summary, elementary and high, public 

and nonpublic, 100-101 
Summer school and workshops, county 

teachers, 177 
Turnover of, 185, 198-201 
Teachers' retirement system, 6, 248, 265 
Technical education, 231, 236-237 
Textbooks, expenditures, 270-271 
Therapy program, hearing and speech, 118 
Trades and industries (Industrial educa- 
tion) 

Adult, 231, 236-237 
Enrollment, 156-157 

Each high school, 288-295 
Federal aid. 230-231, 238 
Schools offering, 168, 288-295 
Teachers, 168 
Transportation of pupils 

Cost, total and per pupil, 212, 216, 269, 
274 

Number and per cent transported, 216 
Number of schools to which transpor- 
tation was provided, 217 
Number vehicles, 217 

Per cent of current expenses, 206-209 
Personnel, 252 
Turnover in teaching staff, 185, 198-201 



V 

Value of 

Assessable property, 227-229 

School property, 223 
Vocational course, each high school, 280-287 
Vocational education 

Courses, adult, 237 

Division of, 76-81 

Enrollment 

Adult education, 236 
Day schools, 143, 158-159 
Each high school, 288-295 

Federal aid, 230-231, 233, 238, 248, 266 
Vocational rehabilitation 

Appropriations, 246-248 

Disability of clients, 242 

Division of, 96-98 

Referrals, 243 

Services rendered, 240-241 



w 

Wealth back of each pupil belonging, 229 

Wealth per capita, 229 

Withdrawals 

Pupils, 120 

Teachers, 198-200 
Workshops, county teachers, 177 

Y 

Year, length of school, 99 



3 1430 02fl734Sb 




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